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Microsoft

Windows Versus Ubuntu

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

macaudailytimes.com.mo: Like most people I use Microsoft Windows and Office on my computer at work, and up until recently I had a similar setup for my home computer. But I recently changed to use the Ubuntu version of Linux and OpenOffice at home and and feel that both systems perform comparably.

Is Microsoft About to Declare Patent War on Linux?

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Microsoft

computerworlduk.com: Microsoft's comments on happenings outside its immediate product portfolio are rare, and all the more valuable when they do appear.

Microsoft licensing Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

mybroadband.co.za: Proprietary giant is licensing open source to its partners. What is going on?

I'm not breaking up with Windows, but we're seeing other people

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.techrepublic.com: For many enterprises, 2010 is going to be the year they decide whether or not to jump on board with Windows 7, or stick with Windows XP. I’ve decided to avoid Windows 7, whenever possible, and rely on Mac and Linux to power my primary systems.

Is Microsoft Afraid to Say the “L”-word?

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworlduk.com: It seems that, having lost its position as monarch of the world of computing, Microsoft has decided to become the industry jester.

Windows: Choice But No Choice

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Software

lxer.com: In the area of window managers Linux users are completely and totally spoiled rotten. We constantly debate the merits of one desktop environment/window manager over another. I wish Windows users had this problem, but they don't. Why? Because they have no choice.

Microsoft’s Toyota Letter

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: Hearing about the Toyota recall and extent to which the company has gone towards compensating Toyota owners makes me imagine a letter from Microsoft addressing Windows operators.

Windows is Easier, Just Like Stabbing Your Own Eyeballs is Easier

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxtoday.com: Lately I've been breaking my own "don't help friends with their Windows PCs" rule. Now I remember why I made that rule in the first place.

Microsoft's Linux Patent Scare Trumps SCO

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft's Linux Patent Scare Trumps SCO
  • Microsoft and I-O Data Sign Linux Patent Deal
  • Microsoft has stake in Novell fight
  • Microsoft's desktop future may look like a phone

Heroes and Villains of Tech

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac
Web
Sci/Tech

pcworld.com: Here's a look at standout good guys and bad guys -- from passionate heroes who balance profit with innovation and social responsibility to money-mad, egomaniac villains who simply cannot be trusted.

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More in Tux Machines

LG Watch Sport review: Not the watch Android Wear needs right now

The LG Watch Sport just looks and feels like a “gadget” and not a “watch.” It harkens back to the days of those old Microsoft Spot watches (remember those?). Instead of reaching as broad a market as possible with the first full-featured Android Wear 2.0 watch, LG and Google have given us something with almost impossibly narrow appeal. This watch is almost exclusively for large-wristed athletic types whose fashion sense leans toward calculator watches. I found myself wanting to put it on just before I left for the gym, and itching to take it off the moment I got home. Android Wear 2.0 deserves a better showcase watch than this. With any luck, another manufacturer will step in with a more universally acceptable design that at least supports Android Pay and has a heart-rate monitor. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Red Hat: Fedora:
  • F25-20170221 Updated ISOs available!!
    It is with great pleasure to announce that the Community run respin team has yet another Updated ISO round. This round carries the 4.9.10-200 kernel along with over 780 MB of updates (avg, some Desktop Environments more, some less) since the Gold release.
  • F25-20170221 Updated Lives Released
    I am happy to announce new F25-20170221 Updated Lives.
  • Our Bootloader Problem
    GRUB, it is time we broke up. It’s not you, it’s me. Okay, it’s you. The last 15+ years have some great (read: painful) memories. But it is time to call it quits. Red Hat Linux (not RHEL) deprecated LILO for version 9 (PDF; hat tip: Spot). This means that Fedora has used GRUB as its bootloader since the very first release: Fedora Core 1. GRUB was designed for a world where bootloaders had to locate a Linux kernel on a filesystem. This meant it needed support for all the filesystems anyone might conceivably use. It was also built for a world where dual-booting meant having a bootloader implemented menu to choose between operating systems.

Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.