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Linux

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Elementary OS Loki 0.4

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Elementary looks great. It is easy to install, easy to use and the applications are perfectly adequate for basic tasks.

The big issue is the package manager. The biggest issue with Ubuntu is the package manager.

The fact that somebody has had to go to the effort to create the Ubuntu After Install application shows there is a problem.

Why can't Ubuntu or one of these derivatives grasp the bull by the horns and come up with a solution.

People like to use Chrome yet all we get is Firefox or some basic equivalent. Chrome works with everything. It is by far the best browser and I don't want to settle for second best.

If you don't want to include it as part of the main package manager add a simple tool for installing this and many other applications including Steam.

On the whole though the distribution looks good and is simple to use and I do recommend it for the Everyday Linux User.

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Distributions and Kernels

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • What is your favorite Linux distribution?

    Of all the many questions you might ask an open source enthusiast, none may evoke quite the passionate response as asking which distribution they prefer.

    People choose a distribution for many reasons, from look and feel to stability, from speed to how it runs on older machines, from the pace of updates to simply which offers the packages they need. Whatever the reason, with so many distributions available, asking which one you use can be seen as a proxy for asking how you choose to interact with your computer.

  • The joy of Just Works
  • Amdocs, Linux Foundation to accelerate service provider, developer adoption of open source ECOMP

    Amdocs and the Linux Foundation have struck up a partnership in an effort to accelerate adoption of the open source Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) platform developed by AT&T.

  • The Age of the Unikernel: 10 Projects to Know

    When it comes to operating systems, container technologies, and unikernels, the trend toward tiny continues. What is a unikernel? It is essentially a pared-down operating system (the unikernel) that can pair with an application into a unikernel application, typically running within a virtual machine. They are sometimes called library operating systems because they include libraries that enable applications to use hardware and network protocols in combination with a set of policies for access control and isolation of the network layer.

    Containers often come to mind when discussion turns to cloud computing and Linux, but unikernels are doing transformative things, too. Neither containers nor unikernels are brand new. There were unikernel-like systems in the 1990s such as Exokernel, but today popular unikernels include MirageOS and OSv. Unikernel applications can be used independently and deployed across heterogeneous environments. They can facilitate specialized and isolated services and have become widely used for developing applications within a microservices architecture.

    [...]

    In this series of articles, we are looking at the projects mentioned in the guide, by category, providing extra insights on how the overall category is evolving. Below, you’ll find a list of several important unikernels and the impact that they are having, along with links to their GitHub repositories, all gathered from the Guide to the Open Cloud:

  • Mesa 17.0 Delayed To Allow For Ivy Bridge OpenGL 4.0

    Mesa 17.0 (formerly known as Mesa 13.1) was supposed to enter its feature freeze last weekend, but that milestone and branching of the code-base didn't happen due to last minute feature work.

Raspberry Pi, Linux Devices, and LEDE 17.01

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Mycroft Available as Raspberry Pi Image

    Mycroft now has a Raspberry Pi image that is ready to run. Developers, makers, hackers and enthusiasts can download the image to their Raspberry Pi and create their own Mycroft enabled projects.

    We have created the Picroft image so the community has access to a quick, easy to install artificial intelligence(AI). Our thinking is that having ready access to an out-of-the-box AI will inspire some crazy cool applications. We’re hoping our community proves us right.

  • New Raspberry Pi Release Targets Industry, IoT

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation on Monday launched its long-awaited industrial strength Compute Module 3. The latest version of the low-cost Raspberry Pi computer, it is designed for more robust manufacturing and technical demand uses than prior versions, which target consumer and basic business needs. The idea behind the new module is to provide a cost-effective way to produce customized products based on the Raspberry Pi 3, noted James Adams, chief operating officer and hardware lead.

  • Blobless Linux on Raspberry Pi (rpi-open-firmware).
  • COM runs Linux on Kaby Lake, supports Intel Optane

    Congatec’s Linux-ready “Conga-TS175” COM Express Basic Type 6 module supports 7th Gen Intel Core E/EQ and Xeon CPUs, Intel Optane SSDs, and up to 32GB DDR4.

    Congatec followed upon its earlier announcement of a Conga-TC175 COM Express Compact Type 6 module with a larger, 125 x 95mm Basic Type 6 module called the Conga-TS175. Both COMs support Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” line of 14nm processors.

  • LEDE 17.01 branched

    this is just a heads-up to inform you that LEDE master has been branched into a new branch "lede-17.01" now.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

A Switch for Your Pi

Filed under
Linux

Thanks to the size of the Raspberry Pi, it's possible to build a project like this into just about anything. I don't have an NES case anymore, but if I did, I'd probably build it inside one for added nostalgia.

I decided to use RetroPie as the distribution for my project. The great thing about using RetroPie is that it basically solves all the issues on my list. It has the "Emulation Station" front end built right in (Figure 1), which supports navigation via controller. It also has emulators already installed, waiting for ROMs to be added. Truly, using RetroPie as my base saved at least one article on software alone!

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Why Linux users should worry about malware and what they can do about it

Filed under
Linux

Preventing the spread of malware and/or dealing with the consequences of infection are a fact of life when using computers. If you’ve migrated to Linux or Mac seeking refuge from the never-ending stream of threats that seems to target Windows, you can breath a lungful of fresh air—just don’t let your guard down.

Though UNIX-like systems such as Mac OS X and Linux can claim fewer threats due to their smaller user bases, threats do still exist. Viruses can be the least of your problem too. Ransomware, like the recent version of KillDisk, attacks your data and asks you to pay, well, a king’s ransom to save your files. (In the case of KillDisk, even paying the ransom can’t save you if you’re running Linux.)

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Getting my new Asus X540S notebook ready for Linux

Filed under
Linux

A number of my laptops and netbooks have moved on to other homes and other purposes recently, so I have been looking for something new.

Last weekend I saw an advertisement for an Asus X540SA at a ridiculously low price (CHF 299 / €280 / £245 / $300), which is always one of my criteria. Another criteria in this case was a 15" screen, and this ASUS has is 15.6", so that made the decision for me.

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Devil-Linux 1.8.0 to Be a Major Overhaul, Will Use SquashFS as Main File System

Filed under
Linux

It's been seven months since we last heard something from the developers of the Devil-Linux project, which produces a tiny, dedicated server distribution for many applications, and a new development version of the upcoming 1.8 stable series is out.

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This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

Filed under
Linux
Web
HowTos

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

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via DMT/Linux Blog

Hardware With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale

    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen.

    The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted.

    That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.

  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here

    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.

  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux

    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.

  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market

    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion.

    Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

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Qt Speech (Text to Speech) is here

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Flatpak 0.8.1 Lets Users Update Apps by Installing Newer Bundles, Fixes Bugs

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Canonical Patches Nvidia Graphics Drivers Vulnerability in All Ubuntu Releases

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Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance andd New Device From CompuLab

  • Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance Made Easier
    The good old days when security breaches only happened to Windows folk are fading fast. Malware hackers and denial of service specialists are increasingly targeting out of date embedded Linux devices, and fixing Linux security vulnerabilities was the topic of several presentations at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) in October. One of the best attended was “Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years” by Pengutronix kernel hacker Jan Lübbe. After summarizing the growing security threats in embedded Linux, Lübbe laid out a plan to keep long-life devices secure and fully functional. “We need to move to newer, more stable kernels and do continuous maintenance to fix critical vulnerabilities,” said Lübbe. “We need to do the upstreaming and automate processes, and put in place a sustainable workflow. We don’t have any more excuses for leaving systems in the field with outdated software.”
  • CompuLab Has Upgraded Their Small Form Factor "IPC" Line To Kabylake
    HARDWARE -- Our friends and Linux-friendly PC vendor, CompuLab, have announced a new "IPC" line-up of their small form factor computers now with Intel Kabylake processors. In the past on Phoronix we tested CompuLab's Intense-PC (IPC) and then the IPC2 with Haswell processors, among other innovative PCs from CompuLab. Now they are rolling out the IPC3 with Intel's latest Kabylake processors.
  • Fanless mini-PC runs Linux Mint on Kaby Lake
    Compulab launched a rugged “IPC3” mini-PC that runs Linux on dual-core, 7th Gen Core i7/i5 CPUs, and also debuted three GbE-equipped FACE expansion modules. Compulab has opened pre-orders starting at $693 for the first mini-PCs we’ve seen to offer the latest, 14nm-fabricated 7th Generation Intel Core “Kaby Lake” processors. The passively cooled, 190 x 160 x 40mm IPC3 (Intense PC 3), which is available in up to industrial temperature ranges, follows two generations of similarly sized IPC2 mini-PCs. There’s the still available, 4th Gen “Haswell” based IPC2 from 2014 and the apparently discontinued 5th Gen “Broadwell” equipped IPC2 from 2015.
  • Compulab IPC3 is a tiny, fanless PC with Intel Kaby Lake CPU
    Compulab is an Israeli company that makes small, fanless computers for home or commercial use. The company’s latest mini PC aimed at enterprise/industrial usage is called the IPC3, and it has a die-cast aluminum case with built-in heat sinks for passive cooling and measures about 7.4″ x 6.3″ x 1.6″.