Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

DistroWatch

Syndicate content
Latest news on Linux distributions and BSD projects
Updated: 4 hours 33 min ago

Distribution Release: Network Security Toolkit 30-11210

Tuesday 16th of July 2019 09:32:53 PM
Network Security Toolkit (NST) is a bootable live CD based on the Fedora distribution. The toolkit was designed to provide easy access to best-of-breed open source network security applications. The project's latest release is based on Fedora 30 and offers a number of enhancements. "Here are some of....

Development Release: Linux Mint 19.2 Beta

Tuesday 16th of July 2019 07:35:17 PM
The Linux Mint team has published a new development snapshot, Linux Mint 19.2 beta, which is available in three editions - Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce. The new beta offers the ability to see how long specific kernels will be supported in the update manager and multiple kernel versions....

Distribution Release: Univention Corporate Server 4.4-1

Tuesday 16th of July 2019 05:07:25 PM
Univention Corporate Server (UCS) is an enterprise-class distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux. The project's latest version is an update to the distribution's 4.4 release, bringing with it performance improvements and application recommendations based on what administrators have installed previously. "The most obvious change is certainly the new app....

Distribution Release: Proxmox 6.0 "Virtual Environment"

Tuesday 16th of July 2019 03:06:56 PM
Proxmox is a commercial company offering specialised products based on Debian GNU/Linux, notably Proxmox Virtual Environment and Proxmox Mail Gateway. Proxmox Virtual Environment is an open-source virtualisation platform for running virtual appliances and virtual machines. The company's latest release is Promox 6.0 "Virtual Environment" which is based on....

Development Release: Emmabuntüs DE3 RC

Monday 15th of July 2019 07:57:12 PM
Emmabuntüs is a desktop Linux distribution featuring the Xfce desktop and based on Debian's Stable branch. It strives to be beginner-friendly and reasonably light on resources so that it can be used on older computers. The distribution's latest development snapshot (Debian Edition 3 RC) is based on Debian....

Distribution Release: Q4OS 3.8

Monday 15th of July 2019 03:24:54 PM
Q4OS is a lightweight Linux distribution based on Debian. The distribution's latest release is Q4OS 3.8 which is available in two desktop editions: KDE Plasma and Trinity. "Q4OS Centaurus is based on Debian Buster 10 and Plasma 5.14, optionally Trinity 14.0.6, desktop environment, and it's available for 64-bit....

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 823

Monday 15th of July 2019 12:07:03 AM
This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: Debian 10 "Buster"News: Will Cooke discusses Ubuntu's desktop plans, Fedora to remove Snap support from GNOME Software, Red Hat's sale to IBM finalizedQuestions and answers: Checking for 32-bit applications on the operating systemReleased last week: FreeBSD 11.3, Tails 3.15, Clonezilla Live 2.6.2-15,....

Distribution Release: Feren OS 2019.07

Sunday 14th of July 2019 03:41:09 PM
Feren OS is a desktop Linux distribution based on Linux Mint's main edition. The project has published a new quarterly snapshot which introduces new themes, a new icon set, and a new splash screen at boot time. On a more technical note, this snapshot fixes an issue with....

Development Release: antiX 19 Beta 2

Saturday 13th of July 2019 07:33:51 PM
The antiX team have published a new development snapshot of the distribution's antiX 19 branch, based on Debian 10 "Buster". The snapshot offers a new tool, called App Select, for finding installed applications and introduces new themes and icons. The release announcement provides further details: "antiX 19 beta....

Distribution Release: Clonezilla Live 2.6.2-15

Friday 12th of July 2019 02:04:25 AM
Steven Shiau has announced the release of Clonezilla Live 2.6.2-15, the latest stable build of the project's specialist Debian-based live image featuring Clonezilla, a partition and disk imaging/cloning application: "This release of Clonezilla Live includes major enhancements and bug fixes: the underlying GNU/Linux operating system has been upgraded,....

Distribution Release: Tails 3.15

Wednesday 10th of July 2019 08:03:37 AM
It's time for another update to Tails (The Amnesic Incognito Live System), a Debian-based live DVD/USB image with the goal of providing complete Internet anonymity for the user. Version 3.15 ships with updated Tor Browser and Thunderbird, and it also fixes several bugs: "Tails 3.15 is out. This....

BSD Release: FreeBSD 11.3

Tuesday 9th of July 2019 06:56:32 PM
The FreeBSD team has announced the launch of an update to the operating system's 11.x series: FreeBSD 11.3. The new version updates build and compiler tools, upgrades the package manager, improves jail logging messages, and updates the KDE Plasma and GNOME desktops. "The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is....

Development Release: OPNsense 19.7 RC1

Tuesday 9th of July 2019 05:05:46 PM
Jos Schellevis has announced the availability of a new release candidate for OPNsense, a HardenedBSD-based specialist operating system (and a fork of pfSense) designed for firewalls and routers. The project's new development snapshot introduces new improvements to logging, several fixes and user interface enhancements. "Here are the full....

Distribution Release: Debian Edu/Skolelinux 10

Tuesday 9th of July 2019 07:57:55 AM
Wolfgang Schweer has announced the release of Debian Edu/Skolelinux 10, a major new version of the project's Debian-based specialist distribution designed for educational institutions, computer labs and school networks: "The Debian Edu developer team is happy to announce Debian Edu 10 Buster, the Debian Edu / Skolelinux release....

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 822

Monday 8th of July 2019 12:10:39 AM
This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: Mageia 7News: Mint team considers Snap packages, IPFire cannot accept donations, UBports works to maintain access to Google accounts, Ubuntu 18.10 nears its end of life, Red Hat offers upgrade guideTechnology review: Running development branchesReleased last week: Debian 10, Mageia 7, NuTyX....

Distribution Release: Debian 10

Sunday 7th of July 2019 12:34:50 AM
The Debian project has announced the release of Debian 10 (code-named "buster"), the latest stable version from the popular community project and the world's largest Linux distribution whose beginnings date back to 1993: "After 25 months of development the Debian project is proud to present its new stable....

Distribution Release: Whonix 15

Tuesday 2nd of July 2019 12:21:26 AM
Patrick Schleizer has announced the release of Whonix 15, a major new version of the project's Debian-distribution designed for secure and anonymous internet browsing. Whonix deploys the Tor network on top of a heavily configured Debian system which is run inside multiple virtual machines, thus providing a substantial....

Distribution Release: NuTyX 11.1

Monday 1st of July 2019 09:34:58 PM
NuTyX is a French Linux distribution (with multi-language support) built from Linux From Scratch and Beyond Linux From Scratch, with a custom package manager called "cards". The project's latest release is NuTyX 11.1 which updates over 1,000 packages and provides 32-bit install media. "I'm very please to announce....

Distribution Release: Mageia 7

Monday 1st of July 2019 11:31:08 AM
Donald Stewart has announced the release of Mageia 7, the new stable version from a community project that forked the defunct Mandriva Linux distribution back in 2010: "Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of Mageia 7. There are lots of new features, exciting updates....

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 821

Monday 1st of July 2019 01:15:27 AM
This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0News: Improvements to Fedora Workstation, DragonFly BSD shrinks kernel memory usage, Turnkey updates several appliancesQuestions and answers: Ubuntu's plan to drop 32-bit packagesReleased last week: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1, Linux Kodachi 6.1, Raspbian 2019-06-20Torrent corner: ArchBang, Bluestar, Container, GParted,....

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z). These patches weren't part of the mainline Linux kernel yet, but they did get Linux running on z/VM (Virtual Machine for IBM Z), for anyone who was interested. Several efforts followed, including the first Linux distro—put together out of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Think Blue Linux by Millenux in Germany. The first real commercial distribution came from SUSE on October 31, 2000; this is notable in SUSE history because the first edition of what is now known as SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) is that S/390 port. Drawing again from Wikipedia, the SUSE Enterprise Linux page explains: Read more

OSS: Cisco Openwashing, GitLab Funding, Amazon Openwashing, Chrome OS Talk and More Talks

  • Why Open Source continues to be the foundation for modern IT

    Open source technology is no longer an outlier in the modern world, it's the foundation for development and collaboration. Sitting at the base of the open source movement is the Linux Foundation, which despite having the name Linux in its title, is about much more than just Linux and today is comprised of multiple foundations, each seeking to advance open source technology and development processes. At the recent Open Source Summit North America event held in San Diego, the width and breadth of open source was discussed ranging from gaming to networking, to the movie business ,to initiatives that can literally help save humanity. "The cool thing is that no matter whether it's networking, Linux kernel projects, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects like Kubernetes, or the film industry with the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), you know open source is really pushing innovation beyond software and into all sorts of different areas," Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation said during his keynote address.

  • GitLab Inhales $268M Series E, Valuation Hits $2.75B

    GitLab raised a substantial $268 million in a Series E funding round that was more than doubled what the firm had raised across all of its previous funding rounds and pushed its valuation to $2.75 billion. It also bolsters the company’s coffers as it battles in an increasingly competitive DevOps space. GitLab CEO Sid Sijbrandij said in an email to SDxCentral that the new Series E funds will help the company continue to move on its goal of providing a single application to support quicker delivery of software. It claims more than 100,000 organizations use its platform. “These funds will help us to keep up with that pace and add to that with our company engineers,” Sijbrandij explained. “We need to make sure every part of GitLab is great and that CIOs and CTOs who supply the tools for their teams know that if they bet on GitLab that we’ll stand up to their expectations.”

  • Amazon open-sources its Topical Chat data set of over 4.7 million words [Ed: openwashing of listening devices without even releasing any code]
  • How Chrome OS works upstream

    Google has a long and interesting history contributing to the upstream Linux kernel. With Chrome OS, Google has tried to learn from some of the mistakes of its past and is now working with the upstream Linux kernel as much as it can. In a session at the 2019 Open Source Summit North America, Google software engineer Doug Anderson detailed how and why Chrome OS developers work upstream. It is an effort intended to help the Linux community as well as Google. The Chrome OS kernel is at the core of Google's Chromebook devices, and is based on a Linux long-term support (LTS) kernel. Anderson explained that Google picks an LTS kernel every year and all devices produced in that year will use the selected kernel. At least once during a device's lifetime, Google expects to be able to "uprev" (switch to a newer kernel version). Anderson emphasized that if Google didn't upstream its own patches from the Chrome OS kernel, it would make the uprev process substantially more difficult. Simply saying that you'll work upstream and actually working upstream can be two different things. The process by which Chrome OS developers get their patches upstream is similar to how any other patches land in the mainline Linux kernel. What is a bit interesting is the organizational structure and process of how Google has tasked Chrome OS developers to work with upstream. Anderson explained that developers need to submit patches to the kernel mailing list and then be a little patient, giving some time for upstream to respond. A key challenge, however, is when there is no response from upstream. "When developing an upstream-first culture, the biggest problem anyone can face is silence," Anderson said. Anderson emphasized that when submitting a patch to the mailing list, what a developer is looking for is some kind of feedback; whether it's good or bad doesn't matter, but it does matter that someone cares enough to review it. What the Chrome OS team does in the event that there is no community review is it will have other Chrome OS engineers publicly review the patch. The risk and worry of having Chrome OS engineers comment on Chrome OS patches is that the whole process might look a little scripted and there could be the perception of some bias as well. Anderson noted that it is important that only honest feedback and review is given for a patch.

  • Open Source Builds Trust & Credibility | Karyl Fowler

    Karyl Fowler is co-founder and CEO of Transmute, a company that’s building open source and decentralized identity management. We sat down with Fowler at the Oracle OpenWorld conference to talk about the work Transmute is doing.

  • What Is Infrastructure As Code?

    Rob Hirschfeld, Founder, and CEO of RackN breaks Infrastructure As Code (IaC) into six core concepts so users have a better understanding of it.

  • Everything You Need To Know About Redis Labs

    At the Oracle OpenWorld conference, we sat down with Kyle Davis – Head of Developer Advocacy at Redis Labs – to better understand what the company does.

Programming: Java, Python, and Perl

  • Oracle Releases Java 13 with Remarkable New Features

    Oracle – the software giant has released Java SE and JDK 13 along with the promise to introduce more new features in the future within the six-month cycle. The Java 13’s binaries are now available for download with improvements in security, performance, stability, and two new additional preview features ‘Switch Expressions’ and ‘Text Blocks’, specifically designed to boost developers’ productivity level. This gives the hope that the battle of Java vs Python will be won by the former. Remarking on the new release, Oracle said: “Oracle JDK 13 increases developer productivity by improving the performance, stability and security of the Java SE Platform and the JDK,”. [...] Speaking of the Java 13 release, it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 along with the Classpath Exception (GPLv2+CPE). The director of Oracle’s Java SE Product Management, Sharat Chander stated “Oracle offers Java 13 for enterprises and developers. JDK 13 will receive a minimum of two updates, per the Oracle CPU schedule, before being followed by Oracle JDK 14, which is due out in March 2020, with early access builds already available.” Let’s look into the new features that JDK 13 comes packed with.

  • 8 Python GUI Frameworks For Developers

    Graphical User Interfaces make human-machine interactions easier as well as intuitive. It plays a crucial role as the world is shifting.

  • What's In A Name? Tales Of Python, Perl, And The GIMP

    In the older days of open source software, major projects tended to have their Benevolent Dictators For Life who made all the final decisions, and some mature projects still operate that way. Guido van Rossum famously called his language “Python” because he liked the British comics of the same name. That’s the sort of thing that only a single developer can get away with. However, in these modern times of GitHub, GitLab, and other collaboration platforms, community-driven decision making has become a more and more common phenomenon, shifting software development towards democracy. People begin to think of themselves as “Python programmers” or “GIMP users” and the name of the project fuses irrevocably with their identity. What happens when software projects fork, develop apart, or otherwise change significantly? Obviously, to prevent confusion, they get a new name, and all of those “Perl Monks” need to become “Raku Monks”. Needless to say, what should be a trivial detail — what we’ve all decided to call this pile of ones and zeros or language constructs — can become a big deal. Don’t believe us? Here are the stories of renaming Python, Perl, and the GIMP.

  • How to teach (yourself) computer programming

    Many fellow students are likely in the same boat, the only difference being that the vast majority not only that don’t list computer science as one of their passions (but more as one of their reasons for not wanting to live anymore), but they get a very distorted view of what computer science and programming actually is.

    Said CS classes tend to be kind of a joke, not only because of the curriculum. The main reason why they are bad and boring is the way they are taught. I am going to address my main frustrations on this matter together with proposed solutions and a guide for those who want to start learning alone.

  • [Old] Perl Is Still The Goddess For Text Manipulation

    You heard me. Freedom is the word here with Perl.

    When I’m coding freely at home on my fun data science project, I rely on it to clean up my data.

    In the real world, data is often collected with loads of variations. Unless you are using someone’s “clean” dataset, you better learn to clean that data real fast.

    Yes, Perl is fast. It’s lightening fast.