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More Iron for your blood...

Internet privacy has been making news, lately. And one group getting some of the focus is Google. Now, there are many issues to talk about here, but I might propose one way to a safer way to use Google, at least when it comes to its Chrome browser.

You see, the Chrome browser is getting more and more attention, for its speed, its rather unique way of presenting info and the browser interface. But it is also known for "phoning home" with browsing patterns, info, etc..

So, a German concern, SRWare took the Chrome code, and re-wrote it, removing the offending pieces. It might be better to hear it from them, from their website: http://www.srware.net/en/software_srware_iron.php

Quote:

SRWare Iron: The browser of the future - based on the free Sourcecode "Chromium" - without any problems at privacy and security

Google's Web browser Chrome thrilled with an extremely fast site rendering, a sleek design and innovative features. But it also gets critic from data protection specialists, for reasons such as creating a unique user ID or the submission of entries to Google to generate suggestions. SRWare Iron is a real alternative. The browser is based on the Chromium-source and offers the same features as Chrome - but without the critical points that the privacy concern.

You can also use the link following the above on their site, to see the comparison between what Google's Chrome does, and what Iron removes.

How do I get Iron, you may ask? Go to their forum for the latest Betas.
http://www.srware.net/forum/viewforum.php?f=18

Once on the forum page, in the top section labeled Bekanntmachungen (Notices) you will see a listing for the latest Betas for the various OS's. Click on your choice and follow the simple directions to install your own version of Iron.

The Beta I have been using these last few days, along with the fabulously new Linux Mint 9, is Iron's 5.0.377 Beta for Linux.

Earlier versions had problems with Flash content, requiring many re-loadings of a page to have it open, if at all. However, this Beta is showing supreme stability and the expected speed of its Chrome sister!

Give it a whirl!

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