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PCLinuxOS KDE 2011.6 post installation tips.

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Linux

1. Maximize the KDE Panel
Right Click on the panel and select Unlock Widgets
Click on the Cashew on the right side of the panel
Click on More Settings
Click on Maximize Panel
Click on the red X to close

2. Thunderbird open Link in Firefox
Launch Firefox
Click on Preferences -> Advanced -> General -> Set Firefox as default browser.

3. Enable ATi fglrx driver Tear Free mode.
Open the Menu -> More Applications -> Configuration -> Ati Catalyst Control Center
Click on Display Options -> Tear Free
Check the box that says Enable Tear Free Desktop to reduce tearing
Click on Apply
Click on OK

4. Enable Automatic Updates
Open the Configure your Computer (PCLinuxOS Control Center)
Click on System
Click on Manage System Services
Check APT to start at boot
Click on Start
Click OK

* An update notifier for your taskbar will be available when yum and yumex comes out of testing.

5. Switch PCLinuxOS to the language of your choice
Click on the Localization Manager icon on your Desktop
Select your native language
Click OK
Wait while PCLinuxOS downloads additional translations
PCLinuxOS will reboot your system after installation is complete
Enjoy PCLinuxOS in your native language.

6. Install LibreOffice in the language of your choice
Click on the LibreOffice icon on your Desktop
Select your native language
Click on OK
Wait while PCLinuxOS installs Java then LibreOffice.
Once everything has been installed click on OK
Enjoy LibreOffice in your native language.

7. Install KDE 4 Help files
Open the Synaptic Package Manager
Click reload to get a current file listing
Click on search
type in task-kde4-help
Right click on task-kde4-help entry
Mark for installation
Click Apply
Click Apply

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