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OSS: NSA, MIT and Mozilla Firefox

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OSS
  • NSA's reverse-engineering malware tool, Ghidra, to get new features to save time, boost accuracy

    Just five months ago at the RSA conference, the NSA released Ghidra, a piece of open source software for reverse-engineering malware. It was an unusual move for the spy agency, and it’s sticking to its plan for regular updates — including some based on requests from the public.

    In the coming months, Ghidra will get support for Android binaries, according to Brian Knighton, a senior researcher for the NSA, and Chris Delikat, a cyber team lead in its Research Directorate, who previewed details of the upcoming release with CyberScoop. Knighton and Delikat are discussing their plans at a session of the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas Thursday.

  • The MIT Press releases a comprehensive report on open-source publishing software

    The report authors, led by John Maxwell, associate professor and director of the Publishing Program at Simon Fraser University, catalog 52 open source online publishing platforms. These are defined as production and hosting systems for scholarly books and journals that meet the survey criteria, described in the report as those “available, documented open-source software relevant to scholarly publishing” and as well as others in active development. This research provides the foundation for a thorough analysis of the open publishing ecosystem and the availability, affordances, and current limitations of these platforms and tools.

  • Mapping the Open-Source Publishing Landscape

    The “Mind the Gap” report, published Wednesday, describes the wide range of open-source publishing tools available for academic books and journals.

    Open-source online publishing platforms have proliferated in the last decade, but many of these initiatives are small and face sustainability challenges. The authors conclude that development of these initiatives often is siloed and incentives for collaboration are lacking.

  • The MIT Press releases a major report on all available open-source publishing software

    Mellon-funded report Mind the Gap catalogs and analyzes all available open-source software for publishing and warns that open publishing must grapple with the dual challenges of siloed development and organization of the community-owned ecosystem

  • Here are 4 Nice Firefox +68 Themes That You Can Try Out

    Starting with Firefox 57, the famous web browser got a totally new extensions engine beside a lot of changes. Many of these changes rendered some famous theme addons void, as they no longer work with the new engine. However, it’s still possible to customize Firefox’s user interface to make it look great again.

    This is done using a special CSS file called userChrome.css, which is capable of styling the Firefox’s user interface according to whatever CSS rules you place inside that file. If this is the first time you hear about this, then you may would like to check our previous post for more details about this.

    In today’s article, we’ll show you 4 ready, already-built Firefox themes that work with Firefox +68 browser. All of these themes depend on the previous userChrome.css file, so you just have to visit the homepages of these themes and read the installation instructions in order to have them on your Firefox.

    We tested every one of these themes, and they work on Firefox 68.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • This Week in Rust 340
  • Simplify data visualization in Python with Plotly

    Plotly is a plotting ecosystem that allows you to make plots in Python, as well as JavaScript and R. In this series of articles, I'm focusing on plotting with Python libraries.

  • Perl Hacks, Perl School, and the future of Perl publishing

    Dave Cross, long-time Perl user, trainer, and author, recently released The Best of Perl Hacks, a curated collection of his best posts from his Perl Hacks blog. His imprint, Perl School, has published six e-books, including two that I wrote. There’s an unrelated book, Perl Hacks: Tips & Tools For Programming, Debugging, And Surviving, by chromatic, Damian Conway, and Curtis “Ovid” Poe. It’s also very good, but completely separate from Dave’s.

  • Qt for Automation changed to Qt M2M Protocols

    Qt M2M Protocols is now automatically included for free to every new Qt Device Creation subscription. The additional distribution license price has been removed as well. Qt Application Development license holders can buy Qt M2M Protocols separately.

  • Using Visual Studio Code for Qt Applications – Part Two

    In the last blog post we saw an essential, C++ oriented, Visual Studio Code setup. That was enough to get going right away, but we can still definitely do more and better. Here I’ll show you how to get a complete setup for your qmake and CMake projects, all this while also wearing a Qt hat (on top of my C++ hat) and having a deeper look at the Qt side. Build qmake Qt projects Qmake is not integrated with Visual Studio Code the way CMake is, so setting up a qmake project for build is slightly more convoluted than doing the same with CMake. This means we’ll have to define our own build tasks. We’re going to do this in two stages: build steps definition and build steps combination, leveraging the fact that Visual Studio Code implements task dependencies and ordered sequential execution of dependencies.

  • Where Did Software Go Wrong?

    Computers were supposed to be “a bicycle for our minds”, machines that operated faster than the speed of thought. And if the computer was a bicycle for the mind, then the plural form of computer, Internet, was a “new home of Mind.” The Internet was a fantastic assemblage of all the world’s knowledge, and it was a bastion of freedom that would make time, space, and geopolitics irrelevant. Ignorance, authoritarianism, and scarcity would be relics of the meatspace past.

    Things didn’t quite turn out that way. The magic disappeared and our optimism has since faded. Our websites are slow and insecure; our startups are creepy and unprofitable; our president Tweets hate speech; we don’t trust our social media apps, webcams, or voting machines. And in the era of coronavirus quarantining, we’re realizing just how inadequate the Internet turned out to be as a home of Mind. Where did it all go wrong?

  • good idea bad implementation crosstalk

    Unfortunately products like the latter seem quite common. Most things in my house are still rather dumb because regrettably few products are actually the same thing, but smarter. Instead smart devices are inevitably some inscrutable machine intelligence physically manifested in my house. So no thanks. Battle lines drawn, everybody pick a side, good idea or bad implementation, and fight!

Android Leftovers

Ryzen 9 3900X/3950X vs. Core i9 10900K In 380+ Benchmarks

Following our initial Core i5 10600K and Core i9 10900K Linux benchmarks last week, here is a much larger comparison I have been working on since then in looking specifically at the Ryzen 9 3900X and 3950X against the Core i9 10900K. It's the largest to date with nearly 400 benchmarks being tested, most of them real-world test cases. The past number of days I have been running this Core i9 10900K vs. Ryzen 9 3900X vs. Ryzen 9 3950X comparison with 381 benchmarks out of 138 distinct applications/workloads on both systems. With this round of benchmarking the Gigabyte Z490 AORUS MASTER and ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO were at play with 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 Corsair memory, Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD, and Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics. Benchmarking was run off Ubuntu 20.04 LTS while upgrading to the Linux 5.7 Git kernel for the very latest kernel bits. All other Ubuntu 20.04 packages were at their respective defaults. Read more

Compact 8K video encoder runs Linux on Kaby Lake

Advantech has launched a “VEGA-8300E 8K Broadcast Video Encoder” and streaming appliance for 8Kp60, 10-bit 4:2:2 HEVC real-time encoding. The system runs Ubuntu on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake CPU and offers 2x hot-swappable SATA bays. We realize that most of you are not in the market for an 8K video encoder, but we occasionally like to check in on the high-end video world where Linux is steadily making inroads. Normally Advantech’s VEGA-8300E 8K Broadcast Video Encoder would have been showcased at the NAB Show, which has been cancelled due to the pandemic. (Some NAB content is available on the online NAB Show Express.) We heard about the VEGA-8300E from an Advantech announcement on Businesswire that revealed the product has won a 2020 Best of Show Special Edition Award presented by TV Technology. Read more