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AOSP or 'Open' Android

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Android
  • An /e/ phone in 2020

    The /e/ phone does not offer all the apps Android does, and it might not be entirely polished yet in the re-branding experience. However, it does provide a very solid, mostly Android compatible experience without the Google bits. The /e/ team offers a wider range of hardware support than most other iOS and Android competitors, it offers most of the popular Android apps people will probably want to use (I only discovered a few missing items I wanted), and the on-line cloud services are better than those of any other phone I’ve used (including Ubuntu One and Google).

    I’d certainly recommend /e/ for more technical users who can work around minor rough edges and who won’t get confused by the unusual branding and semi-frequent permission prompts. I’m not sure if I’d hand one of these phones over to an Android power-user who uses a lot of niche apps, but this phone would certainly do well in the hands of, for instance, my parents or other users who tend to interact with their phones for texting, phone calls, and the calendar without using many exotic applications.

  • A 'Pixel 5' mention spotted in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) comments

    While Google usually announces its flagship devices in October of every year, leaks and rumors of the devices begin showing up in the months leading to the launch. Details of the next-generation Pixels, however, seem to have begun leaking much earlier as there have been reports of the camera placement on Google’s upcoming flagship. Now, mentions of the “Pixel 5” in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code comments somewhat confirm the name and existence of such a device.

    The comment on a code change for the Linux kernel mentions the “Pixel 5 with (version) 4.19”, confirming the existence of a device running version 4.19 of the Linux kernel. Reports of a device running Linux kernel version 4.19 and named “bramble” have also been previously spotted. Codenames of upcoming Pixel devices leaked last month, bearing the names “redfin”, “sunfish”, and bramble” and at least one of those devices is believed to be the mid-range Pixel 4a.

  • Google Pixel 5 make appearance in Android Open Source Project

    Over the past few weeks, we have been seeing the leaks and rumors surrounding Google’s upcoming Pixel 4a smartphone. And now, details about the Pixel 5 flagship device have also surfaced. Just recently, the alleged design of the Google Pixel 5 XL leaked online.

    Now, Google’s next flagship has also leaked in its name. It turns out that Pixel 5 is already in the works within the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code. The leak comes from a new code change for the Linux kernel of Android, where developer Elena Petrova – of AOSP – explains that it has only been tested in Pixel 4 and not in any new device.

  • Google ‘Pixel 5’ makes its first appearance in Android Open Source Project

    We now have potential confirmation from AOSP code comments that Google’s next mainline Pixel phone will, unsurprisingly, bear the name “Pixel 5.” The confirmation comes from a new code change for Android’s Linux kernel, which the AOSP developer explains has only been tested on the Pixel 4 and not the Pixel 5.

  • Pixel 5 surfaces in Android Open Source Project, hints at mid-range chip

    We’ve already seen an alleged render of the upcoming Google flagship, and possible codenames for the Pixel 5 and 5 XL — Redfin and Bramble — have turned up. Now, a code change submitted to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) contained comments that directly mention the Pixel 5.

More in Tux Machines

Wine 5.10

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.10 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - More progress on the WineD3D Vulkan backend.
      - Beginnings of a separate Unix library for NTDLL.
      - Better support for anti-cheat kernel drivers.
      - More glyph substitutions in DirectWrite.
      - Support for DSS private keys.
      - ARM64 exception handling fixes.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.10.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.10.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.10 Starts Work On A Unix Library For NTDLL, More WineD3D Vulkan

    Wine 5.10 is out as the latest bi-weekly development release of this open-source project for allowing Windows games and applications to run generally gracefully on Linux (and other) platforms. Wine 5.10 continues the recent trend of bringing up the Vulkan back-end for WineD3D for this Direct3D 9/10/11 implementation to allow it to run atop Vulkan rather than needing to map it over OpenGL. With Wine 5.10 more functionality is in place but doesn't appear to be good yet for gamers compared to the OpenGL code-path or most notably the out-of-tree DXVK project providing great Direct3D 9/10/11 support over Vulkan and is what is notably used at the moment by Steam Play (Proton).

  • Wine 5.10 out with more WineD3D Vulkan work and anti-cheat improvements

    Alexandre Julliard, CodeWeavers staffer and Wine hacker today announced the Wine 5.10 development release with some more exciting work. They've continued progressing Vulkan support for WineD3D, there's the beginnings of a separate Unix library for NTDLL, more glyph substitutions in DirectWrite, support for DSS private keys, ARM64 fixes and other various bug fixes included. Something bigger came with Wine 5.10 though too, as they also mentioned it has better support for anti-cheat kernel drivers. That's going to be the big one if it's possible to get working properly. Anti-cheat as a whole is the Achilles heel of Wine (and so Steam Play Proton too), as it's often the cause of Windows games being unable to work on Linux through the compatibility layer so it's pleasing to know more work is going on.

Android Leftovers

RK3399Pro module available in $199 and up dev kit

Firefly’s open-spec, $119-and-up “Core-3399Pro-JD4” module runs Linux or Android on a 3-TOPS NPU-enabled RK3399Pro. The module is available as part of a $199 and up “AIO-3399PRO-JD4” dev kit. While we were reporting on the Rockchip RK3399-based Station P1 Geek Mini PC and Face X2 facial recognition device this week we noticed another Rockchip based product from T-Chip Technology’s Firefly unit that was announced in March. We have yet to see any press coverage of the Core-3399Pro-JD4 module, which runs Linux or Android on the RK3399Pro. Read more

OpenGL/OpenCL/Graphics: Gallium3D and Tiger Lake

  • SVGA Gallium3D Now Exposes OpenGL 4.1 Support

    Following VMware making the VMWGFX kernel changes for supporting OpenGL 4.x, the SVGA Gallium3D driver is now exposing OpenGL 4.1 in compatibility profile contexts for this open-source graphics driver used as part of the VMware virtualization stack.

  • Intel Exposes OpenCL 3.0 For Tiger Lake Graphics

    It's a bit surprising that at least as of now OpenCL 3.0 is only being exposed for Gen12/TigerLake while previous generations are on OpenCL 2.1. OpenCL 3.0 is designed to be more flexible in even allowing OpenCL 1.2 drivers to be fitted for CL 3.0 compliance. All OpenCL 2.x functionality can be queried via OpenCL 3.0 as extensions. Thus it's surprising at least for now Intel is only exposing OpenCL 3.0 for Tiger Lake, but we will see in forthcoming Compute Runtime updates if they flip on OpenCL 3.0 for existing generations.