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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How To Install Play Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Play Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Play Framework is a framework that allows us to make web applications with Java and Scala in a fast and easy way. These applications are based on scalability and the possibility that they can be adapted to many different needs.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of Play Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Fix Sudo Command Not Found in Debian 10

    Sudo also called “superuser do” is a command in Linux that allows you to run high-privilege admin commands as a root user. It asked to enter your personal password and confirms your requests by checking a sudoers file.

    After a fresh Debian 10 installation, you could not execute the privileges tasks by running the sudo command. You will get the error ‘sudo command not found in Debian 10′. The reason for this error is the sudo command isn’t included in Debian 10 by default.

    In this post, we will show you how to fix sudo command not found in Debian 10 VPS.

  • How to Replace a Variable in a File Using SED

    Want to know the tricks of replacing a variable in a file using the SED command?

    This article will give you an overview of replacing a variable value in a file using SED. Before replacing a variable in a file using SED, you need to understand what SED is, the syntax of SED, and how SED works.

    I’ll also show how to perform delete operations using SED. This will come after the variable value replacement part. If you’re looking for that, you can directly jump onto that, and skip the rest.

    So, let’s begin the guide.

  • How to Transfer Files Between Linux, Android, and iOS Using Snapdrop

    Cross-platform file sharing has never been easy. Of course, you have services like AirDrop, Nearby Share, and Quick Share, but they only work within their ecosystems.

    As a result, if you want to transfer files from Linux to an Android/iOS device or vice-versa, you need a cross-platform file sharing service. Even though you do have a few different options in this regard, Snapdrop is the most effective file-sharing service of the lot.

  • What to do when your Chromebook is no longer supported

    Recently, my Chromebook Pixel 2015 found itself no longer supported. I really loved that Chromebook. The two of us wrote several novels together and the keyboard/screen was unmatched. To this day I've yet to experience a better keyboard/trackpad combo. But, as they say, all things must end. So, when I received the notification that my Chromebook Pixel would no longer be receiving updates, I felt a tinge of sadness. Sure, I had a Pixelbook as a backup device, but it just wasn't the same. It had a nice keyboard, but it was nowhere near that of the Pixel. And the screen? There was zero comparison.

    I had a choice: Continue using the Pixel, even though it would no longer be receiving upgrades, or do something about it.

One more

  • How to install the Opera Browser on Linux Lite 5.4

    Today we are going to look at how to install the Opera Browser on Linux Lite 5.4. As seen in the video, a person downloads Opera, from the official site, and then installs it with the built-in installer. Enjoy!

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today's leftovers

  • GPL Had Better be a Contract

    Software Freedom Conservancy announced today that they are suing Vizio, which makes TVs, for violations of GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1. Their website has a copy of a signed complaint, the legal document you file with a court to get a lawsuit started.

    Upshot: It looks like SFC’s suing for breach of contract. They’re claiming explicitly that GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1 are contracts, that Vizio breached those contracts, and that they should be held accountable under contract law.

    The main remedy SFC requests—the thing they’re asking the court to do for them—is to order Vizio to give them full corresponding source code, as agreed under GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1. That’s called “specific performance”. It’s a remedy under contract law. Not property law or intellectual property law, like copyright law.

  • Open access switch picks up pace in Australia and New Zealand

    Australian and New Zealand universities have notched up open access deals with two major academic publishers inside a week after Springer Nature unveiled a “transformative agreement” with the Council of Australian University Librarians (Caul).

    The three-year “read and publish” arrangement covers the article processing charges that authors normally pay to move their work in front of paywalls. Researchers will be able to make their articles freely accessible if they are accepted for publication in more than 2,000 journals, provided that their universities subscribe to those journals.

  • OK Lenovo, we need to talk!

    I’ve been wanting to publicly comment on Lenovo’s statement on Linux support for a while, as there’s much to say about it, and my failing attempt at finding a suitable replacement for my venerable T510 gave me an excuse to document my love-hate relationship with Lenovo all at once.

    This is of course my own personal views and ideas, and does not reflect the Haiku project’s position on the topic, nor that of Haiku, Inc. But I feel they deserve to be brought here due to history and the direct and indirect effect it might have had on the project, including previous failed attempts at commercial applications using it.

    While Lenovo is still above many other manufacturers on some aspects, and on others domains, well, nobody does any better anyway, they purport to perpetuating the IBM legacy, so I think (sic) they should be held up to the standard they claim to follow. Yet the discussion about repair and documentation pertains to almost every vendor.

  • sh(1): make it the default shell for the root user

    This changes also simplifies making tiny freebsd images with only sh(1) as a shell

  • #13 It begins…

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from October 01 to October 08.

  • CUDA-Python Reaches "GA" With NVIDIA CUDA 11.5 Release, __int128 Preview

    NVIDIA has made available CUDA 11.5 today as the latest version of their popular but proprietary compute stack/platform. Notable with CUDA 11.5 is that CUDA-Python has reached general availability status. NVIDIA CUDA 11.5 was posted today along with updated device drivers for Windows and Linux systems. Some of the CUDA 11.5 highlights include:

  • AMD GPU Driver Looks To Make Use Of Intel's New Buddy Allocator Code In The Linux Kernel - Phoronix

    Thanks to the nature of open-source, AMD engineers for the "AMDGPU" kernel graphics driver are looking to make use of Intel's new i915 buddy allocator code they introduced as part of all their video memory management changes as part of their discrete graphics bring-up. As part of Intel's bring-up of device local memory support for their dedicated GPU enablement and adding the notion of memory regions and other changes, they added a buddy allocator implementation for allocating video memory. This is an implementation of the well known buddy system for dividing of memory into equal parts (buddies) and continuing equal splitting that until able to satisfy the memory request.

Programming Leftovers

  • Ruby Lands "YJIT" As A Speedy, In-Process JIT Compiler - Phoronix

    YJIT is a JIT compiler for Ruby that leverages the lazy Basic Block Versioning (LBBV) architecture. YJIT has been in the works for a number of years. Most exciting for end-users and developers is that YJIT yields an average speed-up of around 23% compared to the current CRuby interpreter for realistic benchmarks.

  • Release: rebuilderd v0.15.0

    rebuilderd 0.15.0 very recently released, this is a short intro into what it is, how it works and how to build our own integrations!

  • Eclipse OpenJ9 0.29 Released With Full AArch64 Linux Support, More Mature JITServer Tech

    The newest feature release to Eclipse OpenJ9 is now available, the high performance Java Virtual Machine originating from IBM J9. Eclipse OpenJ9 v0.29 was released today, one day after the GraalVM 21.3 release and one month after the OpenJDK 17 debut. But in the case of OpenJ9 v0.29 it continues to target just OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11.

Security, Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub), and Microsoft FUD

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Deploy a Java application using Helm, Part 2 | Red Hat Developer

    In the previous article in this series, you learned how to deploy Java applications to Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) using Helm on Red Hat OpenShift. Developers can use the procedures in Part 1 to easily stand up traditional Java application servers on Kubernetes with predefined Kubernetes manifestos. What if you could have the same benefits when you develop microservices using JBoss EAP and Helm charts? JBoss EAP provides the Extension Pack (XP) to implement content trimming, packaging to a bootable JAR, and a MicroProfile specification including fault tolerance, monitoring, and tracing in support of microservices in the cloud. This article explains how to make a bootable JAR using JBoss EAP XP and Helm and deploy the application to OpenShift.

  • Red Hat build of Quarkus 2.2: Simplified Kubernetes-native Java

    Red Hat has released the Red Hat build of Quarkus 2.2 to continue to support enterprise developers building Kubernetes-native Java applications. The latest release has many great features and performance improvements, including tools to improve developer productivity while in Dev Mode. Let's take a look at some highlights from this release. For a complete list, check out the release notes.

  • What's new in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.9 console

    Red Hat OpenShift console users will discover a rich set of new and improved console features in OpenShift 4.9. This article introduces general improvements, usability enhancements, and new console features for developers using Red Hat OpenShift Serverless, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, and Red Hat OpenShift GitOps.

  • DevOps: 3 skills needed to support its future in the enterprise

    It’s no longer a question of if organizations need DevOps, but rather when they should adopt it, according to the DevOps Institute Upskilling 2021 report. That report finds that global enterprise adoption of DevOps at the project or multiple-project level is at 20 percent and 36 percent, respectively – and the skills needed for a successful DevOps journey span the categories of automation, human, technical, functional, and process knowledge. Whether you’re facing a skills gap in any of those key areas or you’re looking to expand your adoption of DevOps in the near future, keep the following considerations in mind:

  • Productivity lessons learned: 6 CIOs share tips for you and your team

    In our new hybrid work reality, many people in IT have enjoyed the flexibility to rewrite the rules on work-life balance. But it’s been a learning curve, says Kumud Kalia, CIO, Guardant Health. “As we moved to remote working for most of our employees, it became evident that time management had become much more of a juggling act between work, childcare/schooling, and miscellaneous personal priorities without a clear separation between these various activities. We already had flexible working hours for many of our employees, but we found that Zoom fatigue was real and added to the already unrelenting demands upon our people,” says Kalia. We asked CIOs who recently won the 2021 Bay Area CIO of the Year ORBIE Awards for their best productivity tips and lessons learned on work-life balance over the last year and a half. The awards were presented by the Bay Area CIO Leadership Association, a professional community that annually recognizes CIOs for their excellence in technology leadership. From being intentional and selective, to setting the right examples from the top, learn how these award-winning CIOs are making the most of their workday - and encouraging their teams to do the same.

  • Docker and Fedora 35

    In June of 2020, we published an article related to running Docker and Fedora 32. We described various workarounds that were required to run Docker, and we explained the bothersome situation at that time. But Docker has evolved, and it’s time to return to our previous tutorial. Thus, today we’ll talk about using Docker on Fedora Linux 35. With this guide, you should be able to easily recreate an existing development environment, without having to retool your entire pipeline. We’ll focus on getting the right packages, testing a few important scenarios, and helping you with tooling.