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OOXML: move the goalposts, avoid facing the obvious

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OSS

Last week, following a radio discussion, linux.com writer Bruce Byfield characterised two opposing FOSS camps in the OOXML debate who participated in that discussion as being "closer than they have appeared in the past."

The two camps were represented by Roy Schestowitz, the co-founder of the BoycottNovell website, and Jeff Waugh, the media spokesman of the GNOME Foundation. There were a few others who piled on to make it an unequal debate for Schestowitz.

I called this claim insane.

Now Byfield, who's beginning to rapidly show his colours as an apologist for the GNOME faction of this debate, says my claim was made about his "suggestion that both sides believed that they were acting for the good of the community." He seems to have forgotten what he wrote a week ago. Conveniently so.

The goalposts have moved. That's the best way to avoid having to face a problem.

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