Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

XO Sightings

Filed under
OLPC

It seems that the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program's XO laptop is just popping up all over lately. Twice in as many weeks, mention of the green and white laptop has appeared in the most unusual places.

The first appearance was when I recently flew down to southern Indiana to attend an annual IT advisory committee meeting. I used to drive to this meeting when I lived in Indianapolis, but now that we've moved to the northern part of the state, driving an 11-hour round trip for a two-hour meeting is a bit crazed. Luckily, there's a new commuter airline that gets me close to the university.

The first leg of the trip took me to Indianapolis, which still feels like my home airport even after a year away. There, I saw this ad, all big and backlit on the corridor wall across from my gate.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Received Well by Ubuntu Phone Users, Work on OTA-7 Starts

As Łukasz Zemczak is currently in a two-week holiday, Canonical's Timo Jyrinki sent the usual report to inform us all about the good and bad things that happened in the Ubuntu Touch world. Read more

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Ship with OpenStack Liberty

Canonical's James Page posted an interesting message on the Ubuntu mailing list, informing all Ubuntu developers about the steps they need to take in order to update the OpenStack cloud software to version 2015.2.0 (Liberty) in Ubuntu 15.10. Read more

Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 15.10 Highlights [VIDEO]

Ubuntu developers are closing in on the next major release, with the Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf set to debut on October 22. Ubuntu 15.10 is in many respects an incremental release ahead of the 16.04 Long Term Support release in 2016. Among the key innovations in 15.10 is wider use of the Snappy technology for packaging, though it won't replace the core .deb packaging system anytime soon, if ever. Read more

Improving Security for Bugzilla

Openness, transparency, and security are all central to the Mozilla mission. That’s why we publish security bugs once they’re no longer dangerous, and it’s why we’re writing a blog post about unauthorized access to our infrastructure. We have notified the relevant law enforcement authorities about this incident, and may take additional steps based on the results of any further investigations. Read more