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Linux Foundation: Updates on ONAP and the R Consortium

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Linux
  • ONAP’s Second Code Release, Beijing, Enables the Software to Use Kubernetes

    The O​pen Network Automation Platform (ONAP)​ project today issued its second software release — Beijing. It includes more support for containers and some functionality for service providers to deploy ONAP across geographically dispersed data centers.

    The ONAP project gave clues that it was working with the container orchestrator Kubernetes in March when the two projects conducted a joint demonstration at the Open Networking Summit (ONS).

  • ONAP ‘Beijing’ Paves Way for Cloud-Native Network Functions

    The Linux Foundation's LF Networking group announced availability for the second version of ONAP, or the Open Network Automation Platform that is codenamed “Beijing," which is being used by AT&T and several other large carriers to manage and automate network traffic and security.

    Beijing follows "Amsterdam," which was a first release late last year that integrated the code bases from two other carrier orchestration projects, one from AT&T and the other from the largest providers in China, said LF Networking General Manager Arpit Joshipura, in an interview with eWEEK.

  • ONAP Beijing release targets deployment scenarios

    Deployability is the name of the game with the Linux Foundation's latest Open Network Automation Platform architecture.

    Central to the ONAP Beijing release are seven identified "dimensions of deployability," said Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration at the Linux Foundation. These seven deployability factors comprise usability, security, manageability, stability, scalability, performance and resilience.

  • R Consortium is soliciting your feedback on R package best practices

    With over 12,000 R packages on CRAN alone, the choice of which package to use for a given task is challenging. While summary descriptions, documentation, download counts and word-of-mouth may help direct selection, a standard assessment of package quality can greatly help identify the suitability of a package for a given (non-)commercial need. Providing the R Community of package users an easily recognized “badge” indicating the level of quality achievement will make it easier for users to know the quality of a package along several dimensions. In addition, providing R package authors and maintainers a checklist of “best practices” can help guide package development and evolution, as well as help package users as to what to look for in a package.

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This past week we looked at the Windows 10 vs. Linux performance for AMD's just-launched Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and given the interest from that then ran some Windows Server benchmarks to see if the performance of this 64-thread CPU would be more competitive to Linux. From those Windows vs. Linux tests there has been much speculation that the performance disparity is due to Windows scheduler being less optimized for high core/thread count processors and its NUMA awareness being less vetted than the Linux kernel. For getting a better idea, here are benchmarks of Windows Server 2019 preview versus Ubuntu Linux when testing varying thread/core counts for the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. Toggled via the BIOS was SMT as well as various CCX configurations and each step of the way comparing the Windows Server 2019 Build 17733 performance to that of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the Linux 4.18 kernel in various multi-threaded benchmarks supported under both operating systems. Read more

Kernel: RISC-V and Virtual Machine

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    The RISC-V open-source processor ISA support within the mainline kernel is getting into good shape, just a few releases after this new architecture port was originally added to the Linux Git tree. The RISC-V code for Linux 4.19 includes the ISA-mandated timers and first-level interrupt controllers, which are needed to actually get user-space up and running. Besides the RISC-V first-level interrupt controller, Linux 4.19 also adds support for SiFive's platform-level interrupt controller that interfaces with the actual devices.
  • A Hearty Batch Of KVM Updates Land In Linux 4.19
    There is a lot of new feature work for the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) within the Linux 4.19 kernel.

Kate/KTextEditor Picks Up Many Improvements To Enhance KDE Text Editing

Even with KDE's annual Akademy conference happening this past week in Vienna, KDE development has been going strong especially on the usability front. The Kate text editor and the KTextEditor component within KDE Frameworks 5 have been the largest benefactors of recent improvements. This KDE text editing code now has support for disabling syntax highlighting entirely if preferred. When using syntax highlighting, there have been many KTextEditor enhancements to improve the experience as well as improvements to the highlighting for a variety of languages from JavaScript to YAML to AppArmor files. Read more

KStars v2.9.8 released

KStars 2.9.8 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. It is a hotfix release that contains bug fixes and stability improvements over the last release. Read more Also: KDE Itinerary - How did we get here?