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Software: Cockpit, Curl and syslog-ng

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Software
  • Cockpit 202

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 202.

  • Daniel Stenberg: FIPS ready with curl

    It should show that it uses wolfSSL and that all the protocols and features you want are enabled and present. If not, iterate until it does!

  • Peter Czanik: Handling lists in syslog-ng: the in-list() filter

    Recently, a number of quite complex configurations came up while syslog-ng users were asking for advice. Some of these configurations were even pushing the limits of syslog-ng (regarding the maximum number of configuration objects). As it turned out, these configurations could be significantly simplified using the in-list() filter, one of syslog-ng’s lesser known features.

    First, a bit of history. The idea of the in-list() filter came to me while I was listening to Xavier Mertens at a Libre Software Meeting conference talk in France. In his talk, he described how to check log messages for suspicious IP addresses. He used free IP address lists from the Internet (spammer IP addresses, malware command and control IP addresses, etc.) and, using a batch process, he kept checking if any of those were present in the log messages on a nightly basis.

    It occurred to me that all of the above could be done in real-time. Namely, several different parsers capable of extracting IP addresses and other important information from log messages as they arrive are already available in syslog-ng. All that was missing was a tool that could compare the extracted value with a list of values coming from a file. This tool was implemented quickly as a ‘spare time project’ by one of my colleagues. This is how the in-list() filter was born.

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