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Games: Dota Underlords, Natural Selection 2, Iron Danger

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Gaming
  • Dota Underlords to get 2 actually playable Underlords, the Duos team mode and more next month

    Valve have teased what they're calling 'The Big Update' to release in early October, with the final release due not long after that for the first official season.

    The news comes from the first of two smaller updates released over the last few days, all update notes can be seen here. What Valve said they will be doing is adding in 2 playable Underlords, the Duos team mode, 6 new Heroes, 3 new Alliances and an updated user interface. That will come sometime in the first part of October, with the "final stop" (the 1.0 release) to come shortly after with 2 more Underlords, the proper Battle Pass, the City Crawl and the start of the first season.

  • Unknown Worlds are dumping the Linux version of Natural Selection 2

    Some sad news to share this Friday evening, as Unknown Worlds Entertainment have announced they're calling it a day for the Linux version of Natural Selection 2.

    Posted in an official announcement on the NS2 website, they claim they're doing this as a result of it apparently being "more difficult to support and develop for the platform natively" including issues like not finding enough users with QA experience to help.

    Unlike what happened with Rust, they're not offering refunds to previous buyers. They say to claim a refund from Valve if you purchased it in the last "30" days which isn't even right, it's two weeks (and under two hours) on Valve's refund option. They will, however, continue their Linux server.

  • Story-driven tactical RPG with time manipulation mechanics 'Iron Danger' should come to Linux

    Here's some fun news, Iron Danger from Action Squad Studios sounds interesting and it's trying to set itself apart from the many turn-based tactical RPGs out there.

    With the fate of the entire world apparently in your hands you will deal with cosmic magic, monsters and colossal war machines in an attempt to save it. I like games that combine elements from different time periods, so you're dealing with both magic and machine here. You take on the role of Kipuna, a "simple village girl" who ends up gaining power over time itself and this is used during combat.

More in Tux Machines

Programming and Hardware Hacking

  • Raspberry Pi inspired MaaxBoard Mini SBC features NXP i.MX 8M Mini SoC

    Last year, Embest – an Avnet company – introduced MaaXBoard NXP i.MX 8M SBC mostly compatible with Raspberry Pi form factor and running Android 9.0 or Yocto Linux.

  • Code a GUI live with Digital Making at Home
  • RenderDoc 1.10 Released For This Leading Cross-Platform Graphics Debugger

    RenderDoc 1.10 was released on Friday for this leading open-source program supporting frame-capture-based debugging on Vulkan, OpenGL / GLES, and Direct3D across Windows, Linux, and Android along with platforms like Stadia and the Nintendo Switch. RenderDoc 1.10 brings various optimizations and speed improvements, which is always nice to see. RenderDoc should now have lower idle overhead, greater performance when capturing a frame on Vulkan in certain instances, faster cold startup time, improved replay time when switching events for Vulkan captures, and other optimizations.

  • Sublime Text – Best text editor for Linux [Ed: Why promote dodgy proprietary software when better editors exist that are Free/libre?]

    In this guide, you will learn how to install Sublime Text editor on Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Manjaro, etc. Sublime Text is a cross-platform, light-weight code editor. It natively supports many programming and markup languages. Its functions can be extended with plugins. It has many other features, some of them listed below.

  • GCC 11 Compiler Might Finally Enable DWARF 5 Debugging By Default

    For a number of years the GNU Compiler Collection has shipped experimental support for the DWARF 5 debugging data format while finally for next year's GCC 11 release it might be deemed stable and used by default. The DWARF 5 debug data format was published back in 2017 to succeed the now decade old DWARF Version 4. With DWARF 5 there is support for better data compression, various performance improvements, better debug handling around optimized code, and other enhancements over DWARF4. DWARF 5 itself was in development for a half-decade and is detailed at DWARFstd.org.

today's howtos

today's howtos

Python Programming

  • Tweet from Django application using Tweepy

    In this tutorial, we will learn how to post a tweet from Django application using Tweepy.

  • What are Dependencies in Programming

    This article is going to be a very informative read no matter what kind of programmer you are. In fact, even if you aren’t a programmer you will find this article useful. After all, dependencies is not just a programming concept. It’s a general term that has meaning even outside of Computer Science. [...] Dependency is a broad software engineering term used to refer when a piece of software relies on another one. Simply put, if Program A requires Program B to be able to run, Program A is dependent on Program B. This makes Program B a dependency of Program A. You may ask, why would Program A even need Program B, or any other program for that matter? This will be further elaborated in the “Why we use dependencies” section in this article, but a short version is that Program A requires a special service or feature which Program B has. It doesn’t really matter what it is, if your program needs to run correctly, it’s a dependency. Common examples of dependencies are programming libraries, Online services, programming scripts etc.

  • How to rename columns in Pandas Dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover various methods to rename columns in pandas dataframe in Python. Renaming or changing the names of columns is one of the most common data wrangling task. If you are not from programming background and worked only in Excel Spreadsheets in the past you might feel it not so easy doing this in Python as you can easily rename columns in MS Excel by just typing in the cell what you want to have. If you are from database background it is similar to ALIAS in SQL. In Python there is a popular data manipulation package called pandas which simplifies doing these kind of data operations. [...] First step is to install pandas package if it is not already installed. You can check if the package is installed on your machine by running !pip show pandas statement in Ipython console. If it is not installed, you can install it by using the command !pip install pandas.

  • Create the function which converts a given string into an md5 hash and return the value in the hexadecimal format

    When you sign up for an account somewhere, some websites do not actually store your password in their databases. Instead, they will transform your password into something else using a cryptographic hashing algorithm. After the password is transformed, it is then called a password hash. Whenever you try to login, the website will transform the password you tried using the same hashing algorithm and simply see if the password hashes are the same. Create the python function that converts a given string into an md5 hash. The return value should be encoded in hexadecimal.

  • How to rename columns in pandas dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover various methods to rename columns in pandas dataframe in Python. Renaming or changing the names of columns is one of the most common data wrangling task. If you are not from programming background and worked only in Excel Spreadsheets in the past you might feel it not so easy doing this in Python as you can easily rename columns in MS Excel by just typing in the cell what you want to have. If you are from database background it is similar to ALIAS in SQL. In Python there is a popular data manipulation package called pandas which simplifies doing these kind of data operations.

  • Unravelling unary arithmetic operators

    In this entire blog series on Python's syntactic sugar, this might end up being the most boring post. We will cover the unary arithmetic operators: -, +, and ~ (inversion if you don't happen to be familiar with that last operator). Due to the fact that there is only a single object being involved, it's probably the most straightforward syntax to explain in Python. [...] That is literally all of the documentation for unary arithmetic operators in Python's data model. Now is that an over-simplification, or is it actually as simple as it sounds?