Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Tips for finding the perfect PC

Filed under
Hardware

Computer buyers shopping for themselves or their graduates this year have plenty to be happy about: Prices are still shrinking, and performance is still increasing.

Here's a rundown of options to consider when looking at a computer for Father's Day or for the graduate. These specifications determine whether the PC you buy is the digital equivalent of a Toyota Corolla or a Dodge Viper.

Hard-drive storage

Often confused with internal memory, the hard drive is where your computer stores programs and data permanently. When it's running, your computer is constantly reading from and writing to the hard drive. You need a drive big enough to store all your stuff and fast enough to move it around.

Hard-drive capacity is measures in gigabytes (GB). A gigabyte is enough space to store the text of 1,000 average novels, about 800 typical digital photos, 300 album tracks in MP3 music format or about an hour of recorded TV.

Even bargain-basement machines come with 80 GB drives these days, far more space than anyone needs for basic computing — even with digital photos and a music collection.

Serious video work — either creating it or recording TV programs — will eat up as much storage as you can buy. Look for a PC with 160 GB drive or better.

Multimedia drives

All computers come with some form of CD or DVD drive. They're used to install new programs, back up data and ultimately to turn your PC into an entertainment center. Here's what the alphabet soup on the sticker means:

CD-RW: The absolute minimum you'll need. These drives can create data and audio CDs that are permanent or rewritable. They're critical for backing up important data.

DVD/CD-RW: The best value unless you're a budding movie producer. In addition to creating CDs, these drives can play, but not record, DVD movies or video created by users with DVD burners. Only a few dollars more than pure CD-RW drives, their entertainment value is well worth the premium, particularly in a laptop.

DVD-RW/DVD+RW: These drives can create DVDs as well as CDs, and you'll need one to be a true movie impresario. DVDs also store six times as much data as regular CDs, important for backing up large hard drives.

Note the plus and minus sign at the beginning of the previous paragraph. They represent different and incompatible methods of making rewritable CDs — and an example of industry stupidity.

Today, both kinds of drives will make play-only DVDs that work in most standalone players. Newer drives support minus and plus standards for rewritable DVDs. If you can't find a dual-format drive on a PC you like, go for a DVD-R (that's the minus sign). Avoid any drive that uses only the plus format.

New to the mass market this year is the dual- or double-layer DVD writer. This drive can store far more data or video on a DVD than first-generation drives — if you can find dual-layer disks and you're willing to pay a premium for them. Nice but not a deal-breaker.

Audio

PCs have replaced traditional stereo systems in many college dorm rooms, largely because they can play audio CDs and store thousands of digital MP3 files on their hard drives. Most PCs come with built-in audio circuitry that does a creditable job of driving decent PC speakers. The quality won't satisfy audiophiles, but then, nothing does.

More advanced computer sound cards support theater-style surround sound (such as Dolby 5.1), which is important for movie and game buffs looking for a 360-degree experience. For the best sound output — with far better audio input for recording — look for a machine that has a Sound Blaster Audigy or Turtle Beach audio circuitry.

In terms of audio quality, you'll get the best bang for the buck with a good set of speakers. For music, a system with two satellite speakers and a subwoofer for bass notes will do fine. But for surround sound movies and games, you'll need a system with at least two additional speakers.

Video

Your computer's video adapter produces the image on your monitor. Most lower-end PCs have video adapters from Intel built into the motherboard — the computer's main circuit board.

If you're a basic computer user, that's fine; the only downside is that these adapters often use part of the PC's main memory to store images. It's called "shared" memory, and you'll see it noted on the sticker.

Shared memory slows video response and eats up RAM you might need for other programs. If you find yourself otherwise attracted to a machine that uses it, make sure the computer has at least 512 megabytes (MB) of main memory so there's enough to share.
For gaming or video production, find a PC with a graphics adapter from nVidia, ATI or another manufacturer with at least 128 MB of dedicated memory. You might also look for one with a "TV out" port, which allows you to play video on your TV set.

Monitor

The world has gone nuts over flat-panel monitors with liquid crystal displays (LCDs). They're chic and take up less front-to-back space than monitors based on clunky old cathode-ray tubes (CRTs).

Although LCDs aren't cheap, their price has declined to the point where they're no longer guilty pleasures. Just remember that old-fashioned CRTs still produce better images, with more accurate colors, for less money. They're also better suited for movies and games.

Whatever you choose, beware of the "flat-screen" vs. "flat-panel" come-on. A "flat screen" is actually a CRT with a tube that's virtually flat in front, instead of being slightly curved. A "flat panel" is a true liquid crystal display. Make sure you're getting what you want.

Ports

Your computer uses a variety of connectors, or ports, to communicate with the outside world. The most important is the USB 2.0 port, which connects the PC to printers, scanners, mice, keyboards, digital cameras, external drives and other gadgets.

The more USB ports the better — look for one or two on the front for cameras and other devices you'll connect frequently. Likewise, look for a PC with headphone and microphone jacks on the front panel and the back.

A multimedia reader for flash memory cards used in cameras, music players, PDAs and other devices is nice, too, but not critical. Under Windows XP, you can connect most USB gadgets directly to a PC and transfer data as though the device were another disk drive.

If you want to edit digital video from a camcorder, make sure the PC has an IEEE 1394 port, or FireWire. Most camcorders use Firewire cables to connect to computers, although some now come with USB 2.0 connectors, too.

If you're willing to open the case, you can add a third-party FireWire adapter to a computer that doesn't have one for $50 or less.

So there are the basics. Now you want to know how much all these goodies will cost. The answer is not that much.

During my spring scouting trip (in-store and online), I found perfectly useful, low-end Celeron systems complete with a 17-inch CRT monitor for as little as $400. As long as the memory is upgraded to 512 megabytes, a basic computer user doesn't need anything more.

If you think a computer should be fun, too, you'll find capable midrange systems with Pentium 4 processors, 512 megs of RAM, 120 gig hard drives and decent video for $600 to $700, including a good 15-inch LCD monitor. Just remember that moving up to a 17-inch or 19-inch monitor can add several hundred dollars to the cost.

For $1,000 or more, you can come up with a multimedia powerhouse. Just remember that the "or more" can run the bill up to $3,000 for a custom-built fireball.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

  • Improving Storage Performance with Ceph and Flash
    Ceph is a storage system designed to be used at scale, with clusters of Ceph in deployment in excess of 40 petabytes today. At LinuxCon Europe, Allen Samuels, Engineering Fellow at Western Digital, says that Ceph has been proven to scale out reasonably well. Samuels says, “the most important thing that a storage management system does in the clustered world is to give you availability and durability,” and much of the technology in Ceph focuses on controlling the availability and the durability of your data. In his presentation, Samuels talks not just about some of the performance advantages to deploying Ceph on Flash, but he also goes into detail about what they are doing to optimize Ceph in future releases.
  • Ceph and Flash by Allen Samuels, Western Digital
  • Red Hat Opens Up OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    When businesses and enterprises begin adopting data center platforms that utilize containerization, then and only then can we finally say that the container trend is sweeping the planet. Red Hat’s starter option for containerization platforms is OpenShift Dedicated — a public cloud-based, mostly preconfigured solution, which launched at this time last year on Amazon AWS.
  • Volatility Numbers in View for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Rhizome is working on an open-source tool to help archive digital content
    "The stability of this kind of easy archiving for document storage, review and revision is a great possibility, but the workflow for journalists is very specific, so the grant will allow us to figure out how it could function." Another feature of Webrecorder that journalists might find appealing, and one of the software's core purposes, is to preserve material that might be deleted or become unavailable in time. However, the tool is currently operated under a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Takedown policy. This means any individual can ask for a record of their web presence or materials to be removed, so Rhizome will be working to "answer the more complicated questions and figure out policies" around privacy and copyright with the latest round of funding.
  • An ode to releasing software
    There is one particular moment in every Free and Open Source Software project: it’s the time when the software is about to get released. The software has been totally frozen of course, QA tests have been made, all the lights are green; the website still needs to be updated with the release notes, perhaps some new content and of course the stable builds have to be uploaded. The release time is always a special one. The very day of the release, there is some excitement and often a bit of stress. The release manager(s), as well as everyone working on the project’s infrastructure are busy making sure everything is ready when the upload of the stable version of the software, binaries and source, has been completed. In many cases, some attention is paid to the main project’s mirror servers so that the downloads are fluid and work (mostly) flawlessly as soon as the release has been pushed and published.
  • Diversity Scholarship Series: My Time at CloudNativeCon 2016
    CloudNativeCon 2016 was a wonderful first conference for me and although the whirlwind of a conference is tiring, I left feeling motivated and inspired. The conference made me feel like I was a part of the community and technology I have been working with daily.
  • WordPress 4.7 Content Management System Provides New Design Options
    WordPress is among the most widely used open-source technologies in the world, powering more than 70 million websites. WordPress 4.7 was released Dec. 6, providing a new milestone update including new features for both users and developers. As is typically the case with new WordPress releases, there is also a new default theme in the 4.7 update. The 2017 theme provides users with a number of interesting attributes including the large feature image as well as the ability to have a video as part of the header image. The Theme Customizer feature enables users to more intuitively adjust various elements of a theme, to fit the needs of websites that use will upgrade to WordPress 4.7. In addition, the new custom CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) feature within a theme preview lets users quickly see how style changes will change the look of a site. As an open-source project, WordPress benefits from participation of independent contributors and for the 4.7 release there were 482 contributors. In this slideshow eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the WordPress 4.7 release.
  • Psychology Professor Releases Free, Open-Source, Preprint Software
    The Center for Open Science, directed by University of Virginia psychology professor Brian Nosek, has launched three new services to more quickly share research data as the center continues its mission to press for openness, integrity and reproducibility of scientific research. Typically, researchers send preprint manuscripts detailing their research findings to peer-reviewed academic journals, such as Nature and Science. The review process can take months or even years before publication – if the research is published at all. By contrast, “preprinting,” or sharing non-peer-reviewed research results online, enables crucial data to get out to the community the moment it is completed. That, said Nosek, is critical.
  • Integral Ad Science Launches Open Source SDK to Drive Mobile Innovation for the Advertising Industry
  • Tullett Prebon Information, Quaternion and Columbia University form open source risk collaboration
  • Tullett Prebon Information And Quaternion Risk Management Partner To Enhance Transparency And Standardisation In Risk Modelling – Partnership Fuels Columbia University Research To Improve Understanding Of Systemic Risk
  • Integral Ad Science Partners with Google, Others for Open Source Viewability
  • DoomRL creator makes free roguelike open-source to try and counter Zenimax legal threat
  • DoomRL Goes Open-Source in Face of Copyright Claims
    Earlier this week, ZeniMax Medi hit DoomRL, a popular roguelike version of the original first-person shooter, with a cease-and-desist order. This order instructed producer ChaosForge to remove the free downloadable game to prevent further legal action. Instead of taking it down, co-creator Kornel Kisielewicz turned the game open-source.
  • This Indian software company just partnered with the world’s biggest open source community
    In what can be called a major motivation for Indian tech firms, Amrut Software, an end-to-end Software, BPO services and solutions provider has become a GitHub distributor for India region. GitHub hosts world’s biggest open source community along with the most popular version control systems, configuration management and collaboration tools for software developers. It has some of the largest installations of repositories in the world.
  • Python 3.6 released with many new improvements and features
    Python,the high-level interpreted programming language is now one of the most preferred programming language by beginners and professional-level developers.So,here Python 3.6 is now available with many changes,improvements and of course the ease of Python was not left in the work list.

Security Leftovers