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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Codeplay Launches Open-Source 'SYCL Academy' To Learn This Increasingly Popular Standard

    While SYCL has been around for five years as a Khronos standard providing a single-source C++ programming model for exploiting OpenCL, it has yet to reach its prime but demand for it is picking up with Intel working to upstream their SYCL back-end in LLVM, SYCL becoming part of their programming model with oneAPI and Xe Graphics, and other vendors also jumping on the SYCL bandwagon. Codeplay has now provided an open-source SYCL learning code for those interested in this higher-level alternative to straight OpenCL programming.

  • Open-Source Build and Test Tool Bazel Reaches 1.0

    Derived from Google's internal build tool Blaze, Bazel is a build and test tool that offers a human-readable definition language and is particularly aimed at large, multi-language, multi-repositories projects. Originally open-sourced in 2015, Bazel has now reached 1.0.

    One of the major implications of reaching version 1.0 for Bazel is the promise of greater stability and backward-compatibility guarantees. This has been a historical pain point for Bazel users, who often found themselves in the situation of having to rewrite part of their build rules due to frequent breaking changes in Bazel or its ecosystem. Accordingly, the Bazel team has committed to following semantic versioning for future Bazel releases, meaning only major versions will be allowed to include breaking changes. Furthermore, the team committed to maintaining a minimum stability window of three months between major versions.

  • DevOps Deeper Dive: DevOps Accelerates Open Source Innovation Pace

    That rate of innovation has increased dramatically in the last few years. However, much of that innovation would not have been possible if large swaths of the open source community hadn’t been able to employ best DevOps practices to collaborate, said CloudBees CEO Sacha Labourey.

    [...]

    None of this shift has been lost on IT vendors. As the demand for proprietary code slackened, many found it profitable to offer support services for open source software. The more there is to consume, the more the support services contracts grew. Now every vendor from IBM to small IT services providers such as Fairwinds has launched open source projects that help drive demand for IT services expertise.

    “There’s pain around integrating a lot of disparate open source projects,” said Robert Brennan, director of open source software for Fairwinds. “Organizations may be getting software for free, but there’s usually not a lot of help around.”

    Now almost every IT vendor in the world is making software engineers available to work on open source projects. All that talent focused on open source projects has led to the development of new platforms such as Jenkins, GitHub, Kubernetes and, more recently, a raft of smaller projects. With the rise of containers and cloud-native applications, open source software projects are entering another era that will see many of those same software engineers leveraging DevOps practices more broadly to drive even more innovative projects at increasingly faster rates.

  • Find your next developer from open source communities

    Meanwhile, demand for data scientists is rising as companies seek AI-based solutions to stay competitive. Demand is reflected in salary offers. Companies competing to hire and retain data experts are offering on average more than US$100,000, making it one of the most highly paid professions in the States.

    For companies lacking the budget to hire or train in-house staff to fill the role, they may find themselves struggling with maintaining technological infrastructure or moving forward with plans for digitization.

    Therefore, open source learning and further development of communities could be the solution to this gap.

    An IBM grant to support open source communities such as Girls Who Code, a non-profit organization offering coding lessons for women in the US, is a step forward to filling in a shortage of software developers.

More in Tux Machines

This week in KDE: building up to something big

We’ve got some really big things planned and in progress for Plasma 5.18 and Frameworks, and work proceeds smoothly. None of it is quite done yet, but we did land a number of nice bugfixes and user interface polish for issues that have been irritating people for years…and mere days! Read more

GNOME in Review and Outreachy in GNOME

  • Ten Years Past GNOME's 10x10 Goal, The Linux Desktop Is Still Far From Having A 10% Marketshare [Ed: The desktop itself is on the decline and they're not counting Chromebooks (or misuse the brand "Linux")]

    That very ambitious 10x10 goal is still documented on the GNOME Wiki and is about "10% of the global desktop market." Perhaps in some very select geographic regions, the Linux desktop marketshare may be close to 10%, but on any large scale that goal is still a pipe-dream. [...] In any case, GNOME has advanced a lot over the past decade and particularly the past 2~3 years since Canonical switched back to GNOME Shell by default and has helped in addressing many bugs -- including several high profile performance issues. GNOME 3.34 is a hell of a lot better than the state of GNOME 3.0 from at the start of this decade. In reliving GNOME's highlights from the past decade, here is a look at the twenty most viewed GNOME stories since 2010.

  • Outreachy week-2 progress report!

    It was a really productive week. I am almost done with the current tasks. I’ve finished replicating the wire-frame of gnome-builder’s search-and-replace-bar widget into the libdazzle-example application. There are a couple (or maybe a couple more) of final nitpicks to do to actually mark these as finished. At the moment, I am far more comfortable with the project. Nothing seems really alien-sih now, rather most of the stuffs (from the project) looks quite familier (and imparts somewhat proper sense).

D9VK 0.40

  • D9VK, the Direct3D9 to Vulkan layer has a huge new 0.40 'Croakacola' release out

    For use with Wine and Steam Play Proton, D9VK is the awesome project based on DXVK which translates Direct3D9 to Vulkan for better performance. A big new release just went out. Codenamed Croakacola, D9VK 0.40 is a big one. D9VK can now use more than 4GB VRAM on 32-bit applications/games, with it being noted to help modded Skyrim/Oblivion and obviously more too. There's also now async presentation across all vendors, some "query flushing" improvements, performance fixes for Risen and Legend of the Heroes: Trails of the Sky, bloom rendering fixes for SpinTyres/Mudrunner and other misc updates.

  • D9VK 0.40 Uses Async Present On All Drivers, Various Other Features + Perf Optimizations

    D9VK 0.40 is out today as the latest feature update to this Direct3D 9 over Vulkan translation layer based on DXVK. D9VK lead developer Joshua Ashton released version 0.40 today as the "Croakacola" release and it includes some big features like for 32-bit applications to be able to utilize more than 4GB of video RAM, which should help Skyrim, Oblivion, and other games.

Graphics: Mesa 20.0 Development, Mir Work and Radeon's Linux Limits

  • Mesa 20.0-devel Intel Gallium3D Performance Benchmarks Are Looking Good For Ice Lake

    While the Mesa 20.0 cycle is quite young and still over one month to go until the feature freeze for this next quarterly installment of these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan Linux drivers, it's quite exciting already with the changes building up. In particular, on the Intel side they are still positioning for the Intel Gallium3D driver to become the new default on hardware of generations Broadwell and newer. Here is a quick look at how the Intel Gallium3D performance is looking compared to their legacy "i965" classic OpenGL driver that is the current default. As you should already know if you've been reading Phoronix for any real length of time, the new Intel Gallium3D driver is quite competitive and for supported generations is generally now ahead of their classic OpenGL driver. The Intel Gallium3D driver supports OpenGL 4.6 like the i965 driver and the lingering bugs are just being addressed before turning it on as the default Intel OpenGL Linux driver while i965 will be sticking around as the default for Haswell and older.

  • Ubuntu's Mir Display Stack Accomplished A Lot In 2019 For Being Discounted Two Years Ago

    Canonical's Alan Griffiths continues leading the Mir efforts and his team had a very busy 2019 continuing to push along Mir even though it's not featured on the Ubuntu desktop right now is still playing a big role at the company due to IoT use-cases like digital signage. Griffiths provided a look back at Mir in 2019 on Ubuntu Discourse. Here were some of the highlights:

  • AMD releases the Radeon 5500XT

    Now step forward almost six months and the drivers for the 5700 and 5500 lines still don’t exist. OK sure there are drivers for Ubuntu 18.04.03, and ONLY for Ubuntu 18.04.03, nothing newer.