Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2019-10-28 | Linux Headlines

    Tor sets its sights on 2020, the KernelCI project moves to its new home, Microsoft finalizes their Linux powered IoT plans and great news for video playback on older Linux systems.

  • A secret to productivity for busy individuals with chaotic contexts

    This methodology and philosophy works best for those I would call “organized chaos warriors”. Stay tuned for the next two blog posts this Wednesday and Friday, which will present my “typology of workers” (where I define the chaos warriors) and my favorite Free and Open-Source tool for Getting Things Done.

  • Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font

    In 2002, just one year after the founding of CC, designer Ryan Junell accomplished the difficult task of designing a logo that is distinctive, yet teaches through its design. Over time, the CC logo has become a recognizable symbol of the open movement, even accepted by the Museum of Modern Art in New York as a permanent addition in 2015.

  • Tantek Çelik: #Redecentralize 2019 Session: IndieWeb Decentralized Standards and Methods

    On Friday 2019-10-25 I participated in Redecentralize Conference 2019, a one-day unconference in London, England on the topics of decentralisation, privacy, autonomy, and digital infrastructure.

    After giving a 3 minute lightning talk, I helped Kevin Marks run a session in the first time slot of the “unconference” portion of the day. I participated in two more sessions, and gave a closing statement in the end of day circle. This post is from the Etherpad session notes and my own memory recall from three days ago.

    Kevin Marks started the session by having me bring up the tabs that I’d shown in my lightning talk earlier, digging into the specifications, tools, and services linked therein. Participants asked questions and Kevin & I answered, demonstrating additional resources as necessary.

  • 2019.42 Answered

    Welcome to the first issue of the Rakudo Weekly, formerly known as the Perl 6 Weekly. It continues the tradition of weekly news about the development of Rakudo, an implementation of the Raku Programming Language. Please see About for more background on this incarnation of this weekly blog.

  • The London Perl Workshop 2019

    I went to the London Perl Workshop 2019 this weekend. I've been attending the London Perl Workshop several times in the past, and it has always been a great workshop. This year the workshop had a brand new team of organisers, and they did a great job of following up on the legacy that is the London Perl Workshop (LPW).

  • Adobe Gets Permission From U.S. to Continue Offering Services in Venezuela

    Earlier this month, Adobe announced that it would be forced to delete all user accounts for customers in Venezuela by October 28 to comply with President Donald Trump’s Executive Order 13884. Adobe said at the time that users wouldn’t even receive refunds, which the company said would be against U.S. law. But Adobe has been granted a special waiver, perhaps because it’s not clear how a ban on Adobe products in the country would advance U.S. interests.

    “After discussions with the US government, we’ve been granted a license to provide all of our Digital Media products and services in Venezuela,” Chris Hall, vice president and general manager of customer experience at Adobe, said in a statement published early this morning.

  • The Ransomware Superhero of Normal, Illinois

    About 10 years ago, Michael Gillespie and several classmates at Pekin Community High School in central Illinois were clicking on links on the school’s website when they discovered a weakness that exposed sensitive information such as students’ Social Security numbers. They quickly alerted their computer repair and networking teacher, Eric McCann.

    “It was a vulnerability that nobody even knew about,” McCann said. “They did a quick search on passwords and student accounts, and lo and behold, that file is sitting out there.”

  • Congress Still Doesn't Have an Answer for Ransomware

    The letter itself reveals the mysterious depth of this growing problem: Congress and the agencies tasked with protecting American’s security are basically clueless when it comes to even understanding the scope of the problem.

  • The Market for Voting Machines Is Broken. This Company Has Thrived in It.

    In the glare of the hotly contested 2018 elections, things did not go ideally for ES&S, the nation’s largest manufacturer of voting technology.

    In Georgia, where the race for governor had drawn national interest amid concerns about election integrity, ES&S-owned technology was in use when more than 150,000 voters inexplicably did not cast a vote for lieutenant governor. In part because the aged ES&S-managed machines did not produce paper backups, it wasn’t clear whether mechanical or human errors were to blame. Litigation surrounding the vote endures to this day.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Font Management On Linux - YouTube

    Many new-to-Linux users have questions about installing fonts and previewing fonts on Linux. While there are some nice GUI applications that help with these tasks, you don't actually need to install any extra programs to manage your fonts.

  • Dmenu Is Great So I'll Keep Simping For It - YouTube

    At this point the only Suckless tool I actively use is Dmenu, it's an absolute great launcher especially if you're the kind of person who doesn't really care about having a super fancy looking app, Dmenu is functional and that's all it needs to be.

  • Remove ^M (CTRL-M) Characters from a File in Linux - Putorius

    Operating systems have different ways to handle a newline in their text editors. For example Windows uses a specific carriage return (CR) which is depicted as ^M on Linux, followed by a line feed (LF) to indicate a newline. Linux and UNIX on the other hand use only the line feed to denote the end of a line. This often causes issues when transferring (or even copy and pasting) a file from Windows to Linux. It is hard to spot, and often leaves people scratching their head and wondering why their configuration file is not working.

  • How to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Rocket.Chat on CentOS 8

    Rocket.Chat is a free and open-source chat and messaging application built with Meteor. It is an alternative to Slack and allows you to chat with other members, make video and audio calls, create channels and private groups, share files, and folders and many more. It is self-hosted and helps your team to communicate and share ideas on desktop and mobile devices.

  • How to Check Ubuntu Version with Command or Script

    The lsb-release is the standard package for reporting the version on Ubuntu systems. Which is basically written in Python programming language. The lsb-release package provides a command lsb_release used to check Ubuntu version and codename on command line. In this tutorial, you will learn various options to lsb_release command on Ubuntu system.

  • Updated Docker pages

Jetson Xavier system bundles LIPSedge 3D vision camera

LIPS’ IP67-protected “LIPSedge AE400” 3D vision industrial camera is now available with Aaeon’s Linux-driven, AGX Xavier based Boxer-8240AI computer. The RK3399-based camera is built around an Intel RealSense D415 and offers GbE with PoE. Aaeon announced that its Boxer-8240AI edge AI system based on Nvidia’s high-end Jetson AGX Xavier module has received Nvidia Isaac Certification for a bundle that combines the compact, embedded system with LIPS Corp’s LIPSedge AE400 Industrial 3D Camera. The camera is billed as an industrial version of the Intel RealSense dual-lens stereovision camera. Applications for the Aaeon/LIPS offering include autonomous guided vehicles (AGV), vision guided robots, and smart factory systems. Read more

Release of t2 GNU/Linux 20.10

  • T2 20.10 tagged and shipping!

    A decade in the making, T2 version 20.10 was finally tagged and shipped! Grab your favorite release ISO, e.g. highly optimized AMD64, PPC64 for your PS3, MIPS64 for your Sgi Octane or any other of our release builds for playing along at home!

  • t2 Linux 20.10 released

    The 20.10 release of the t2 Linux distribution is available.

Canonical/Ubuntu: FOSDEM 2021 Community DevRoom, Snap Store and Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

  • Laura Czajkowski: FOSDEM Community Devroom 2021 CFP

    The twenty-first edition of FOSDEM will take place 6-7 February, 2021 – online, and we’re happy to announce that there will be a virtual Community DevRoom as part of the event.

  • When you need the numbers just right – benchmark and profiling applications in the Snap Store | Ubuntu

    The world of software is a vast and complex one, often too difficult to easily assess by human intuition alone. Which is why detailed and accurate measurements of software behavior are essential in helping us understand and gauge how well our applications perform. The Snap Store has a fair share of productivity tools and utilities, including a wide range of benchmarking and profiling tools. These are designed to help developers, system administrators and hardcore enthusiasts get a precise sense of their software, whether as part of research and design or for troubleshooting ongoing problems in production environments. Let’s have a little tour.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

    The Ubuntu Technical Board is responsible for the technical direction of Ubuntu. It makes decisions on package selection, packaging policy, installation systems and processes, kernel, X server, display management, library versions, and dependencies. The board works with relevant teams to establish a consensus on the right path to take, especially where diverse elements of Ubuntu cannot find consensus on shared components. The current Technical Board is expiring at the end of the year, and the Community Council would like to confirm a new Technical Board, consisting of five people, who will serve for two years.