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today's leftovers

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  • 2019-10-28 | Linux Headlines

    Tor sets its sights on 2020, the KernelCI project moves to its new home, Microsoft finalizes their Linux powered IoT plans and great news for video playback on older Linux systems.

  • A secret to productivity for busy individuals with chaotic contexts

    This methodology and philosophy works best for those I would call “organized chaos warriors”. Stay tuned for the next two blog posts this Wednesday and Friday, which will present my “typology of workers” (where I define the chaos warriors) and my favorite Free and Open-Source tool for Getting Things Done.

  • Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font

    In 2002, just one year after the founding of CC, designer Ryan Junell accomplished the difficult task of designing a logo that is distinctive, yet teaches through its design. Over time, the CC logo has become a recognizable symbol of the open movement, even accepted by the Museum of Modern Art in New York as a permanent addition in 2015.

  • Tantek Çelik: #Redecentralize 2019 Session: IndieWeb Decentralized Standards and Methods

    On Friday 2019-10-25 I participated in Redecentralize Conference 2019, a one-day unconference in London, England on the topics of decentralisation, privacy, autonomy, and digital infrastructure.

    After giving a 3 minute lightning talk, I helped Kevin Marks run a session in the first time slot of the “unconference” portion of the day. I participated in two more sessions, and gave a closing statement in the end of day circle. This post is from the Etherpad session notes and my own memory recall from three days ago.

    Kevin Marks started the session by having me bring up the tabs that I’d shown in my lightning talk earlier, digging into the specifications, tools, and services linked therein. Participants asked questions and Kevin & I answered, demonstrating additional resources as necessary.

  • 2019.42 Answered

    Welcome to the first issue of the Rakudo Weekly, formerly known as the Perl 6 Weekly. It continues the tradition of weekly news about the development of Rakudo, an implementation of the Raku Programming Language. Please see About for more background on this incarnation of this weekly blog.

  • The London Perl Workshop 2019

    I went to the London Perl Workshop 2019 this weekend. I've been attending the London Perl Workshop several times in the past, and it has always been a great workshop. This year the workshop had a brand new team of organisers, and they did a great job of following up on the legacy that is the London Perl Workshop (LPW).

  • Adobe Gets Permission From U.S. to Continue Offering Services in Venezuela

    Earlier this month, Adobe announced that it would be forced to delete all user accounts for customers in Venezuela by October 28 to comply with President Donald Trump’s Executive Order 13884. Adobe said at the time that users wouldn’t even receive refunds, which the company said would be against U.S. law. But Adobe has been granted a special waiver, perhaps because it’s not clear how a ban on Adobe products in the country would advance U.S. interests.

    “After discussions with the US government, we’ve been granted a license to provide all of our Digital Media products and services in Venezuela,” Chris Hall, vice president and general manager of customer experience at Adobe, said in a statement published early this morning.

  • The Ransomware Superhero of Normal, Illinois

    About 10 years ago, Michael Gillespie and several classmates at Pekin Community High School in central Illinois were clicking on links on the school’s website when they discovered a weakness that exposed sensitive information such as students’ Social Security numbers. They quickly alerted their computer repair and networking teacher, Eric McCann.

    “It was a vulnerability that nobody even knew about,” McCann said. “They did a quick search on passwords and student accounts, and lo and behold, that file is sitting out there.”

  • Congress Still Doesn't Have an Answer for Ransomware

    The letter itself reveals the mysterious depth of this growing problem: Congress and the agencies tasked with protecting American’s security are basically clueless when it comes to even understanding the scope of the problem.

  • The Market for Voting Machines Is Broken. This Company Has Thrived in It.

    In the glare of the hotly contested 2018 elections, things did not go ideally for ES&S, the nation’s largest manufacturer of voting technology.

    In Georgia, where the race for governor had drawn national interest amid concerns about election integrity, ES&S-owned technology was in use when more than 150,000 voters inexplicably did not cast a vote for lieutenant governor. In part because the aged ES&S-managed machines did not produce paper backups, it wasn’t clear whether mechanical or human errors were to blame. Litigation surrounding the vote endures to this day.

More in Tux Machines

WordPress 5.3 “Kirk”

5.3 expands and refines the block editor with more intuitive interactions and improved accessibility. New features in the editor increase design freedoms, provide additional layout options and style variations to allow designers more control over the look of a site. This release also introduces the Twenty Twenty theme giving the user more design flexibility and integration with the block editor. Creating beautiful web pages and advanced layouts has never been easier. Read more

Proprietary Software From OnlyOffice and Microsoft

  • OnlyOffice, the Open Source Office Suite Apis Now Available on Flathub

    Big fan of productivity software? If so, you may be interested to know that the OnlyOffice Desktop Editors are now available on Flathub. Yes, Flathub, aka the de facto app store for Flatpak, the cross-distro containerised app distribution method.

  • ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors Now Available To Install On Linux From Flathub

    ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors, a free and open source office suite that offers text, spreadsheet and presentation editors for the Linux, Windows and macOS desktops, is now available on Flathub for easy installation (and update) on Linux distributions that support Flatpak. Flathub is an app store and build service for Linux that distributes applications as Flatpak packages, which allows them to run on almost any Linux distribution. ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors allows creating, viewing and editing text documents, spreadsheets and presentations with support for most popular formats like .docx, .odt, .xlsx., .ods, .pptx, .csv and .odp. Its website claims it has the "highest compatibility with Microsoft Office formats".

  • How to get Microsoft core fonts on Linux

    Linux is an open-source operating system. As a result, it is missing some critical components that users of proprietary operating systems enjoy. One big thing that all Linux operating systems miss out on is proprietary fonts. The most used proprietary fonts out there today are the Microsoft Core Fonts. They’re used in many apps, development, and even graphics design projects. In this guide, we’ll go over how to set them up on Linux. Note: not using Ubuntu, Debian, Arch Linux, Fedora, or OpenSUSE? Download the generic font package here and install the fonts by hand.

IEI's and Arbor Technology's Linux-Ready Devices

  • IEI ITG-100AI DIN-Rail Rugged mini PC Comes with a Myriad X AI Accelerator Module
  • Compact Kaby Lake signage player has dual 4K HDMI ports

    Arbor’s rugged, Linux-friendly “IEC-3900” signage player has a 7th Gen U-Series Core CPU, dual independent 4K HDMI ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, M.2 SATA storage, and a 130 x 124 x 35mm footprint. Arbor Technology, which recently introduced a rugged ELIT-1930 signage player based on Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake, has now launched an even more rugged signage system with a much more compact form factor that runs on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake processor. The 130 x 124 x 35mm, 0.73 kg IEC-3900 runs Linux or Win 10 on a dual-core, 2.8GHz/3.9GHz Core i7-7600U or 2.6GHz/3.5GHz Core i5-7300U.

today's howtos