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Qt and KDE Leftovers: Porting Qt Applications to Qt MCUs 1.0, PyQt, FOSDEM 2020, Season of KDE 2020 and Cantor

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KDE
  • Porting Qt Applications to Qt MCUs 1.0

    Last year, we ported a Qt Quick Application to Qt for MCUs 1.0.
    Foundation of this porting has been a demonstrator we had built together with the Qt Company.

  • Python 3.8 woes

    These days, Python is big, has lots of computer-sciency features that I don’t grok, and packaging Python is still hard. And the documentation is, for the most part, not very useful. I didn’t care a lot about that, though, since we only use Python as Krita’s extension language together with PyQt. And we had a nice and working setup for that.

    Well, nice… It’s a bit hacky, especially for Windows. Especially since we need to build Krita with mingw, because msvc has problems compiling the Vc library. And Python has problems getting built with mingw-gcc on Windows.

    We have three related parts: python, sip, which creates Python libraries out of special hand-written header-like files, and PyQt, which binds Pyton and Qt.

    So, we start with a system-wide install of Python. This is used to configure Qt and build sip and PyQt. Then we download an embeddable Python of exactly the same version as the system-wide install, and install that with Krita’s other dependencies.

  • FOSDEM retrospective

    FOSDEM has come and gone for 2020, so it’s time to look back at another huge event (it was a birthday event, although I didn’t notice it that much). Like most years, I was non-stop busy with either the booth or talking to people, so no photographs.

    [...]

    If there’s a main takeaway from this day for me, it’s that KDE on Wayland on FreeBSD is not close yet, but we’ll be working towards it for the next six months and coordinating with Gnome and the rest of the desktop stack to make that happen. Raichoo will be leading the Wayland bits. (Over two years ago I wrote a bit about Weston already!)

    In the evening I defected and met up with Bhushan and the Plasma Mobile and UBPorts and PostmarketOS people for dinner. I don’t know mobile, so this was a learning experience.

  • My 3 weeks of SoK!

    My proposal for Season of KDE 2020 was accepted and I was so happy to work on this. So this project is all about the revamp of Umbrello website with a modern Jekyll theme KDE uses. I had already given a revamp for the Konversation website on December 2019 under the mentorship of Carl Schwan. Umbrello is basically a UML modeller which is a great application by KDE for UML. Umbrello would help communication ease between other developers and other businessmen. To be honest I wasn’t a user of Umbrello as I never had a job to create a UML diagram. So the biggest challenge to me was getting used to the application.

    This project aims in revamping the website of Umbrello with the latest Jekyll template KDE uses. A Redesigned homepage can help new developers and users to get a better knowledge of the application if the workflow with proper screenshots and GIFs are added to it. The news and the announcements can be shifted to a separate page as it makes it much more organized.

  • Jupyter and Cantor Projects

    In the recent release of Cantor – KDE Frontend to mathematical applications – the support for Jupyter notebook format was announced. To cite from Cantor’s release announcement:

    Jupyter is a a very popular open-source web-based application that provides an interactive environment for different programming languages. The interactive documents are organized in “notebooks”. This application is widely used in different scientific and educational areas and there is a lot of shared notebooks publically available on the internet. As an example for a collection of such notebooks see this collection.

    For Cantor, which is very similar in spirit to Jupyter, we decided to add the ability to read and save Jupyter’s notebook format in order to benefit from the big amount of available content for Jupyter. The implementation required for this was mainly done by Nikita Sirgienko as part of the Google Summer of Code 2019 project. His series of blog posts contains many examples as well as implementational details that will be omitted here.

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