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Fast forward with a Kazehakase web browser

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Software

The second most popular web browser in the world, Firefox, is a beautiful, but heavy machine. Its biggest attraction are tabs, flexible bookmarks and RSS management and extensions. However for people who are still using systems with no abundance of main memory it can be a pain intensively using firefox throughout a day. It is just that memory hungry. So some people have been looking at alternatives such as GNOME's epiphany, galeon or even the lightest but arguably ugliest and least featureful among them, dillo. But as it usually happens, out of nowhere comes another alternative, one which may be hitting the right balance that many people are looking for; strangely named kazehakase.

It's aim is to be lightweight (small memory footprint) and yet modern, user friendly, fully functional and innovative at that. And in its early releases it seems to be accomplishing just that.
Enriched standard features

All the basics that a common web surfer learned to rely on today, very much thanks to Firefox, are present in kazehakase; tabbed browsing, bookmarks management, download manager and possibly even extensions in the future. However, kazehakase adds a special touch to some of these features.

Tabbed browsing:

Tabbed browsing is fully configurable in preferences. (edit > preferences > tab). You can set such things as tab width, wether to show favicons or close buttons, switching between tabs using a mousewheel, tab status colors and how should kazehakase behave when you open or close new tabs (for example, should it show next or last open tab once you close the current one).

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