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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat OpenShift 4.7 Streamlines Application Modernization

    Red Hat OpenShift 4.7 includes the latest version of OpenShift Virtualization. First released in July 2020, OpenShift Virtualization is designed to help organizations break down application barriers between traditional and cloud-native infrastructure and extend control over distributed resources.

  • How I became a Kubernetes maintainer in 4 hours a week

    I have heard (and even said) versions of this sentiment many times since Kubernetes started gaining influence. So, over the last year, I've spent time contributing to the project, and I've found it worth every minute.

    I've discovered that Kubernetes is a project with the right scale for anyone to make an impact in whatever time they have available in their schedule. For me, that was just four hours a week. No more, no less.

    After six months at four hours a week, I found myself the leader of a subgroup that's making a significant difference around non-code contributions to the project.

    I'll share some of what I've learned about contributing to Kubernetes. I hope it helps you find the focus and time to join in.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-08

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)! The Beta freeze is underway.

    I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

  • Advancing the organization towards hyper versatility and perpetual innovation

    Digital innovation has rarely been more important than it became in 2020, when COVID-19 moved much of the world virtual. In our previous two posts, we discussed what shapes digital innovation and how critical it is in underpinning the business. In this post, we'll discuss the building blocks for digital innovation.

  • 2021 is the year that open source overcomes its diversity problems [Ed: Racist and sexist company has decided to pose or pretend to be the opposite of what it really is.]

    As the 2020 StackOverflow survey pointed out, technology companies — and many open source communities — have a diversity problem. While the majority of developers currently come from a white, male background, the momentum is shifting to create more inclusive, diverse communities.

    Research shows that diverse open source projects are more productive and make better decisions. This starts with creating teams that have a greater representation of gender, race, socioeconomic standings, ethnic backgrounds, and the like.

    Many open source communities are recognizing the need for new initiatives and a cohesive focus to tackle the lack of diversity in their projects. I predict that in 2021, building off the momentum of this past year’s focus on social inequality and steps made by open source-minded companies and foundations, open source communities will continue to increase the diversity of their communities so that it becomes the rule and not the exception.

    [...]

    As noted, communities need to actively work to remove barriers to increasing diversity. Here are a few examples of such efforts. Some of these are by IBM — which I of course have the most insight into — but this goes far beyond us. I believe we need to see more of these everywhere!

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • LFCA: Learn Binary and Decimal Numbers in Network – Part 10

    In Part 9 of the LFCA series, we covered the basics of IP addressing. To better understand IP addressing, we need to pay more attention to these two types of IP address representation – binary and decimal-dotted quad notation. As mentioned earlier, an IP address is a 32-bit binary number that is usually represented in decimal format for ease of readability. The binary format uses only the digits 1 and 0. This is the format that your computer comprehends and through which data is sent across the network. However, to make the address human-readable. It is conveyed in a dotted-decimal format which the computer later converts into binary format. As we stated earlier, an IP address is made up of 4 octets. Let’s dissect the IP address 192.168.1.5.

  • 6 advanced tcpdump formatting options

    The final article in this three-part tcpdump series covers six more tcpdump packet capturing trick options.

  • 5 Funny Commands to use in Linux and Terminal

    Not everything in Linux is serious, fortunately we can find fun programs created for the sole purpose of entertaining us. You may be wondering why? Well, because we are human and at the end of the day we need a little variety, laughter and maybe a drink on the train. And yes, speaking of the train, let’s introduce you to the first fun command-type application in Linux.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Should you ever reinstall your Linux box? If so, how?

    Broadly speaking, the Linux community can be divided into two camps – those who upgrade their operating systems in-vivo, whenever there is an option to do so in their distro of choice, and those who install from scratch. As it happens, the former group also tends to rarely reinstall their system when problems occur, while the latter more gladly jump at the opportunity to wipe the slate clean and start fresh. So if asked, who should you listen to? The question of system management in Linux is a complex one, with as wide a range of answers as there are distributions. In this blog post, we discuss the concept of reinstall, and whether it’s necessary. Then, we address several other closely related ideas like system imaging, full disk encryption, and data backups. [...] System problems are an unfortunate side effect of software usage. With some luck and operational discipline, you can avoid most of them. When they do happen, you want to know what to do. Reinstalling your Linux system is always an option, but it’s usually not necessary, even for various difficult, complex problems. Even if you do decide to reinstall, you should consider using a live session to inspect the system or perform any last-minute backups, have a solid backup procedure in place regardless, and weigh the benefits of encryption against your day-to-day needs and risks. System images can also help you reduce the hassle of getting back to speed when you do decide to “reset” your distro. That’s all we have on Linux reinstallations. If you have any comments or suggestions, please join our forum, and let us know your thoughts.

Star Labs Launches Coreboot Configurator for Its Linux Laptops

After many months of hard work, last month, Star Labs finally added support for installing the Coreboot open-source firmware in its Star LabTop Mk IV and Star LabTop Mk III Linux laptops, giving users faster boot times and a more secure boot experience where they have full control over their hardware. Today, Star Labs announced a new version of Coreboot that fixes various bugs, along with Coreboot Configurator, a new app that lets owners of its Linux-powered laptops to change various settings of the Coreboot open-source firmware via the nvramtool command-line utility. Read more

Proxmox Backup Server 1.1

We are happy to announce version 1.1 of Proxmox Backup Server! The enterprise backup solution for backing up and restoring VMs, containers, and physical hosts seamlessly integrates into the virtualization management platform Proxmox Virtual Environment, allowing users to simply add a server as a new storage target. Read more Also Debian based: Rocket.Chat Desktop

LXQt 0.17.0 Desktop Environment Released, Here’s What’s New

Arriving more than five months after LXQt 0.16.0, the LXQt 0.17.0 release is here to add an option to the Panel to make it act as a dock by automatically hiding itself when it overlaps a window, add full support for file creation times in the file manager, as well as to add support for non-LXQt apps to save their last settings when the session is terminated. Moreover, LXQt 0.17.0 add separate idle watchers for AC and battery to the Power Manager, lets users create launchers from Tools menu of the file manager, improves support for SVG icon sets, improves opening of a mixed selection of files with different mime types, and adds natural keyboard navigation on the desktop. Read more