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Fedora + Eee PC = Eeedora

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Linux

I am a fan of affordable technology. I like relatively cheap gadgets, and I like open source. When I heard about Asus’ Eee PC, I took it with a certain grain of salt. I thought that maybe it was just another company trying to take a piece of the pie from the One Laptop Per Child initiative.

Then the more I read about the OLPC, the more I realized that the two gadgets may have been created for different purposes. The OLPC is a non-profit, educational-social project, while the Eee PC is an affordable subnotebook being sold with the intent for profit.

The Eee PC’s price range varies from approximately $300 to $500; within that range you can get a configuration with a 2 GB, 4 GB, or 8 GB solid state drive, and for the 4 GB and 8 GB models, you can opt for an embedded webcam as well. All models come with 3 USB ports, 1 MMC/SD port, and a VGA port for an external display, which can display up to 1600×1280 resolution.

By default, the Eee PC comes with a slightly modified version of Xandros Linux with KDE as its window manager. Because the Eee PC is a full-blown Intel-based computer, there is absolutely nothing stopping us from installing other Linux distributions on it.

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