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What I Did at Google's Summer of Code

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Software

Summer is a time for vacation, for introspection and for summer student internships. In 1967, it was about love. And in 2005, it was about code -- for Google, that is.

About 9,000 people applied to Google for the paid opportunity to participate in Google's Summer of Code program, an open source development project aimed at producing new and established open source programs.

The program was originally set up to accept 200 participants but that number doubled to 410 projects that were spread across 41 different sponsoring organizations, including Google.

Each successful coder was offered $4,500 for the summer's work, and each mentoring organization was to receive $500 for each developer project they oversaw.

The Apache Software Foundation topped the list of awards at 38 projects; KDE came in second at 24. Also on the list were FreeBSD (20), Python Software Foundation (19), Mono (16), Ubuntu (14), Fedora Core (13), Google (13), GNOME (12), Gallery (12), Codehaus (12), Drupal (11), Winlibre (10), Jabber (10), Mozdev (10), Samba (6) and Asterisk (4).

Though KDE, a graphical desktop environment for Linux and Unix, received the second highest number of Google Summer of Code students.

Full Story.

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