Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What I Did at Google's Summer of Code

Filed under
Software

Summer is a time for vacation, for introspection and for summer student internships. In 1967, it was about love. And in 2005, it was about code -- for Google, that is.

About 9,000 people applied to Google for the paid opportunity to participate in Google's Summer of Code program, an open source development project aimed at producing new and established open source programs.

The program was originally set up to accept 200 participants but that number doubled to 410 projects that were spread across 41 different sponsoring organizations, including Google.

Each successful coder was offered $4,500 for the summer's work, and each mentoring organization was to receive $500 for each developer project they oversaw.

The Apache Software Foundation topped the list of awards at 38 projects; KDE came in second at 24. Also on the list were FreeBSD (20), Python Software Foundation (19), Mono (16), Ubuntu (14), Fedora Core (13), Google (13), GNOME (12), Gallery (12), Codehaus (12), Drupal (11), Winlibre (10), Jabber (10), Mozdev (10), Samba (6) and Asterisk (4).

Though KDE, a graphical desktop environment for Linux and Unix, received the second highest number of Google Summer of Code students.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

You Can Now Turn Your Old Moto G2 "Titan" Phone Into an Ubuntu Phone, Here's How

Walid Hammami managed to port UBports' Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on the Moto G2 2014 smartphone, which features a Qualcomm MSM8226 Snapdragon 400 chip, 1GB RAM, and 8GB internal storage. As such, Moto G2 has been accepted by the UBports project as the first community supported device, and it's a well-done port with everything working just fine, including Wi-Fi, GSM, 3G, GPS, Bluetooth, SMS, Camera, Ubuntu Store, etc. Read more

OSS: IBM, Logz.io, Forbes FUD and OpenAI

Graphics: Mesa and More

Red Hat Leftovers