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Is Microsoft out to kill, rather than conquer netbooks?

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Microsoft

A funny thought occurred to me today while reading Joe Penettieri's article on the "Fatal Windows 7 Flaw [that] Will Bolster Linux Netbooks". According to his article, Microsoft has apparently changed it's mind about it's lineup of versions for Windows 7. So now, instead of a "netbook" version, they will apparently be offering their "starter" edition instead on notebooks.

This is a blatant and arrogant slap to the face for netbook users. With it's three application limit, Windows 7 Starter Edition is more or less Microsoft's way of saying that netbooks are substandard PC's, and their users are substandard people only interested in a cheap product, and not the "more powerful" (read more expensive) hardware you should be using.

While they haven't said that verbally, their actions have spoken volumes about what they think of netbooks. Which then leads me to another thought.

rest here




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