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The best games of 2001

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Gaming

If you've already read our articles, "The Best Distros of 2000" and "The Best Window Managers of 2000" and crave even more retro geekery, we descended back down into the dark cellars below the Linux Format head offices to dig out more gems from the archive. This time we've surfaced with another group test: the best Linux games of the time, which is both fun (we all had fun playing these back in the day) and depressing (Linux games have sadly not moved on that much!) at the same time.

Once you exclude commercial games such as Quake, Doom, Unreal Tournament and every from Linux Game Publishing, there's not a great deal to be amazed by on Linux. Back in 2001, things weren't much different - SDL was still catching on, with SVGALib much more common; 3D games were few and far between; and card games were the only thing really done well.

Picture the scene. Another caffeine-demanding Monday morning. That disgustingly clingy drizzle outside shows no signs of stopping. The bus is slow, the train can't keep itself on the rails, and you're already 15 minutes late. And on arrival, you're blessed with a whole wonderful week of hard graft, agonisingly annoying colleagues, sanity-threatening stacks of work, and an overall belief that a solution must exist to this endlessly spiralling vortex of tedium.

What can you do?




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