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Free and Open Source Bioinformatics Software for Linux

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Bioinformatics, as defined by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (BCBI), is the field of science in which biology, computer science, and information technology merge into a single discipline.

Bioinformatics is being used largely in the field of human genome research by the Human Genome Project, which has been determining the sequence of the entire human genome (about 3 billion base pairs) and is essential in using genomic information to understand diseases. It is also used largely for the identification of new molecular targets for drug discovery.

To aid scientists as well as students in their analysis and study, I have a here a list of some of the most capable free and open source Bioinformatics software for Linux:

Bioclipse
Based on Java, the Bioclipse project is a visual platform for chemo- and bioinformatics based on the Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP). As any RCP application, it uses a plugin architecture that inherits basic functionality and visual interfaces from Eclipse, such as help system, software updates, preferences, cross-platform deployment etc. Via theseplugins, Bioclipse provides functionality for chemo- and bioinformatics, and extension points that easily can be extended by other, possibly proprietary, plugins to provide additional functionality. The first stable release of Bioclipse includes a CDK plugin to provide a chemoinformatic backend, a Jmol plugin for 3D-visualization, and a BioJava plugin for sequence analysis.

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