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Working with KDE desktop effects

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KDE
HowTos

So you’ve followed the latest series on KDE 4.5 (see Ghacks KDE 4.5 content) and you are now using the spectacular latest release from the KDE team. You want to use Compiz, but quickly realize that it is not necessary as KDE has it’s own built-in compositing effects. What you will find is that the built-in KDE compositing is not like Compiz - but it is comparable and much easier to use. And the fact that it is built-in, ensures you will have less issues with integration.

In this article I am going to introduce you to the KDE Desktop Effects manager and how to use it to make your KDE desktop experience as sleek as it can be.

Installation

Fortunately there will be no installation. So long as you are using one of the more recent iterations of KDE (such as 4.4 or 4.5 – though I highly recommend you upgrade to 4.5) you will have this feature available to you.

Launch the settings tool and begin your journey




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