Linux Mint 10 review

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Linux

Linux Mint 10, aka Julia, is the latest release of Linux Mint, the desktop-oriented distribution based on Ubuntu. Like most distributions, Linux Mint has editions, or versions, for several desktop environments. There is, for example, GNOME, KDE, LXDE, Xfce, and Fluxbox editions. The main edition is GNOME-based, and is always the first one to be made available for the public. This is a review of the main edition, that is, the GNOME edition.

Installation: Linux Mint’s installer is Ubiquity, the same installation program on Ubuntu and its derivatives. Compared to the installers on other distributions, it has not changed substantially for a long time. While the interface has been tweaked several times, it still lacks support for LVM, the Linux Logical Volume Manager, RAID, and disk encryption. While we can do without RAID on a desktop-oriented distribution, LVM and disk encryption are must-have features. There are differing opinions on this, but if you come to understand the benefits of LVM and of disk encryption, then you will come to appreciate why I regard them as must-have features.

New to the installer is support for btrfs, the B-tree File System, a journaling file system being primed to replace ext4 as the default file system on Linux distributions.

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