Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Why Firefox Could Become a Top Browser Again

Filed under
Moz/FF

For the web browser, 2011 was an astonishing year. Google fundamentally changed our perception of what a web browser is and what it should do. According to StatCounter, Chrome gained 42.5 percent market share or 11.59 points, while IE lost 19.0 percent or 7.35 points, and Firefox lost 21.4 percent or 5.4 points. (For the remainder of this article I will only consider data provided by StatCounter, as it is the most comprehensive browser market share data set that is freely accessible.) You can love or hate Chrome, but there is little denying that Google's Chrome strategy, a combination of rapid browser development, convenient software delivery through silent updates, backwards compatibility, quick security fixes, and high-profile advertising, is working quite well.

Many people have asked me about the current browser environment and which browser would be the most stable alternative, especially for business use. When I ran the numbers, there was a surprising result that looked especially interesting for Mozilla. Before we look specifically into Firefox, let's first look at the status quo of the browser market with a six-month outlook.

rest here

Also: The BIG browser benchmark: Chrome 18 vs Opera 11 vs Firefox 11 vs IE9 vs Safari 5

And: Mozilla releases BrowserQuest - A free online role playing game




More in Tux Machines

Mesa 10.3.2 Has A Couple Bug-Fixes

For those living by stable Mesa releases rather than the exciting, bleeding-edge Mesa Git code for open-source Linux graphics drivers, Mesa 10.3.2 is available this Friday night. Mesa 10.3.2 has fixes for Nouveauy's GM107 Maxwell and GK110 support, a handful of Intel DRI driver fixes, and also a few R600g/RadeonSI driver fixes. Mesa stable users interested in learning more can find the 10.3.2 release announcement by Emil Velikov, the new Mesa release manager. For those after the latest Git developments, Mesa 10.4 will be declared stable in December. Read more

openSUSE Tumbling, Fedora Slipping, and Calculating Linux

The big news today is the merger of openSUSE Factory and Tumbleweed. Fedora 21 is delayed again due to numerous blockers. Jack M. Germain looks at Calculate Linux 14 and Bryan Lunduke is back with another desktop review, this week LXDE. There's a "victory for free software" in the news, but it's not in Berlin where Microsoft Office is being substituted for OpenOffice. Read more

Ubuntu's shiny 10th birthday Unicorn: An upgrade fantasy

I've been covering Ubuntu for seven of the release’s 10 years and 14.10 is the first time I've had to dig deep into the release notes just to find something new to test. If you needed further proof that Canonical is currently solely focused on bringing its Unity 8 interface to mobile devices, 14.10 is the best evidence yet. Almost nothing Canonical develops has changed in this release - there isn't even a new desktop wallpaper. There are some updates to be sure, but they don’t hail from Canonical. Point release updates for default GNOME apps are included, as is a new kernel, the latest version of Mesa, and some other underlying tools. The lack of updates isn't unexpected, in fact that's been the plan all along. Read more

today's leftovers