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Is Steam the Big Breakthrough Gaming for Linux Need?

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Gaming

For many gamers, Steam is the most banked-upon tool in their gaming inventory. You can purchase, gift and play games using the software and also you can communicate with other players. Led by Gabe Newell, Steam is widely appreciated for being one of the nicest gaming companies around. For years, Steam was available only on Windows. Then, of course, Valve Corporation decided to branch out to other platforms as well leading to the release of Steam for Mac OS X in 2010. 2 years later, Steam brought good news for many Linux fans and gamers alike. This year, Valve released Steam Beta for Linux, a fully native port of the amazing gaming software bringing world-class gaming to this often-overlooked platform. With the release came the announcement of porting of Left 4 Dead 2 on this platform.

Apart from making many Linux-loving gamers happy, Steam has thrown light on a platform that is very often overlooked, especially in terms of gaming. Gaming on Linux has always been something that has kept many Windows users from switching over. Though things in the gaming department might not change overnight, it still is a big boost to the operating system’s already soaring popularity. So, as the wheels are turning, many Linux users and supporters are wondering if this is the big breakthrough Linux gaming needed.

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