Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Cancel Netflix if you value freedom

Filed under
OSS
Web

or the last few months, we've been raising an outcry against Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), a plan by Netflix and a block of other media and software companies to squeeze support for Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) into the HTML standard, the core language of the Worldwide Web. The HTML standard is set by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which this block of corporations has been heavily lobbying as of late.

The proposed adoption of EME is disturbing for what it says about the way decisions are made relative to the Web, but what does it mean for you as a free software user?

DRM and free software don't mix. All DRM software relies on keeping secrets, like decryption algorithms, from the user, so that users cannot design their own method to modify it. The secrets are stored on users' own computers in places users cannot access or even read. This practice inherently tramples Freedom 1 of the Free Software Definition: the freedom to study how a program works and change it so it does your computing as you wish.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

MATE 1.14 Desktop Finally Lands in Manjaro Linux's Repo, New MATE Edition Is Out

Manjaro leader Philip Müller announced this past weekend that the major MATE 1.14 desktop environment has finally landed in the main software repositories of the Arch Linux-based distribution. Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Needs Your Help to Make GCC 6 the Default Compiler

We reported at the beginning of the month that the openSUSE Tumbleweed developers are preparing a massive package rebuild to make the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 the default compiler for the rolling operating system. Read more

Google reveals nationalities of students in open source-focused Summer of Code 2016

Every summer, many students get excited for some well-deserved time off from studies; well, if their region practices such a vacation, that is. In some cultures, school is year-round. While this is unfortunate from the standpoint of socializing and having fun, it arguably keeps the students on track for great success. For students that are particularly motivated and education-focused, Google hosts its legendary Summer of Code. This program pairs future developers with open source projects. Not only do these young folks learn, but they get to contribute to the projects as well. Today, the search giant shares the nationalities of the students participating in Summer of Code 2016. For the first time ever, Albania has a representative -- woo-hoo! This may surprise you, but the USA is not the most-represented nation. The top country, however, may shock you -- or not. Read more