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Installing Xubuntu 6.06 on a Gateway Laptop

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Ubuntu

Xubuntu 6.06 is a derivative from the popular Ubuntu Linux distro that uses the Xfce Window Manager instead of Gnome or KDE. Xfce is a light weight Open Source window manager that is fast and efficient which makes Xubuntu ideal for lower end computers. Or if you want a super fast system try Xubuntu on a newer system like a my Gateway MX6440 Laptop (1.8Ghz Turion64 with a gig of RAM) and you'll be amazed at how fast Linux can run.

Over the past few months I have been immersing my self back into the Linux world after a few years on hiatis. One thing that has struck me the most is the abundance of LiveCDs like Ubuntu, SLAX and Knoppix just to name a few. I have gone from Fedora 4 then to 5 and then to OpenSuSE 10 only to find that these "major" distros are no better or any more stable than the "minor" distros and LiveCD's. For awhile I had settled on Kanotix but that all ended when I got a laptop upgrade and Knotix no longer worked properly. This restarted my hunt for a distro again.

For the longest time I felt that Ubuntu and all of it's counterparts was not a real Linux distro and I never gave it a second glance then. I was for a few months a die-hard Knoppix/Kanotix fan. Both Knoppix and Kanotix worked fine on my old HP ZE4560 Laptop and I had read Knoppix Hacks so many times that I could recite the book in my sleep.

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