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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Trinity Desktop Environment R14.0.3 released
  • KDE Plasma 5.6 Released – Here's What's New

    KDE Plasma 5.6 plasma has been released and anounced by KDE Development Team. This release a feature-packed new version of its desktop user interface, Plasma 5.6.

  • Ways to Help Krita: Work on Feature Requests
  • KDE neon Press
  • KDAB contributions to Qt 5.6

    Qt 5.6 has just been released! Packed with incredible new features, 5.6 is also the first long term support release of Qt: it will be supported for the next 3 years, giving developers a solid foundation for their current and upcoming projects. Once more, KDAB is confirmed to be the largest independent contributor to Qt, as clearly demonstrated by the commit activity graph in Qt (KDAB is the green one)...

  • Marble Vector OSM Update

    Recently I found some time again for Marble development, and today Sanjiban and me made some nice progress on vector rendering. This can easily be explained with pictures, so let’s look at an example rendering.

  • Plasma Weather widget: add your favorite weather data provider

    The KDE meta sprint at CERN (of groups WikiToLearn, Plasma, VDG, techbase wiki cleanup) at begin of this March, where I mainly went for techbase wiki cleanup work, of course was a great occasion to also work face-to-face with Plasma developers and VDG members on issues around the Weather widget, and so we did. Marco helped me to learn more about Plasma5 technologies which resulted in some small bugs fixed in the widget still in time for Plasma 5.6 release.

  • Cutelyst 0.11.0 released!

    Cutelyst the Qt web framework just got a new release, I was planning to do this a while back, but you know we always want to put in a few more changes and time to do that is limited.

  • Easy access to Kdenlive builds on *ubuntu

    This work is now owned by a team on Launchpad, you are welcome to join if you want to co-maintain the packages. I deleted my own unmaintained PPA, and invite users to switch to one of the above.

    If daily builds are available on other distributions, maintainers are welcome to advertise their work on our wiki, and will be glad to relay the info here!

  • Introduction to KDE Muon Discover, The Kubuntu Software Center

    In Ubuntu regular version, we use Ubuntu Software Center (USC for short) to install applications. In Kubuntu (Ubuntu KDE version), we use Muon Discover (Muon for short). USC and Muon are two same functional things, but with different details. While USC created specially for Ubuntu, Muon created for any Debian-based distribution using KDE, thus Kubuntu uses Muon. For those don't know, Muon Discover as desktop application is similar with Google Play Store as mobile application in Android, or App Store in iOS, or Mac App Store in OS X. Here, we explain how to use Muon as Kubuntu Software Center.

More in Tux Machines

Security: DHS on Potential Voting Machines Cracking, Joomla Patches Critical Flaw

  • DHS tells 21 states they were Russia hacking targets before 2016 election
  • 1. WikiLeaks, Russian edition: how it’s being viewed
    Russia has been investing heavily in a vision of cyberdemocracy that will link the public directly with government officials to increase official responsiveness. But it is also enforcing some of the toughest cybersecurity laws to empower law enforcement access to communications and ban technologies that could be used to evade surveillance. Could WikiLeaks put a check on Russia’s cyber regime? This week, the online activist group released the first of a promised series of document dumps on the nature and workings of Russia’s surveillance state. So far, the data has offered no bombshells. “It’s mostly technical stuff. It doesn’t contain any state contracts, or even a single mention of the FSB [security service], but there is some data here that’s worth publishing,” says Andrei Soldatov, coauthor of “The Red Web,” a history of the Soviet and Russian internet. But, he adds, “Anything that gets people talking about Russia's capabilities and actions in this area should be seen as a positive development.”
  • Joomla patches eight-year-old critical CMS bug
    Joomla has patched a critical bug which could be used to steal account information and fully compromise website domains. This week, the content management system (CMS) provider issued a security advisory detailing the flaw, which is found in the LDAP authentication plugin. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is used by Joomla to access directories over TCP/IP. The plugin is integrated with the CMS. Joomla considers the bug a "medium" severity issue, but according to researchers from RIPS Technologies, the problem is closer to a critical status.
  • Joomla! 3.7.5 - Takeover in 20 Seconds with LDAP Injection
    With over 84 million downloads, Joomla! is one of the most popular content management systems in the World Wide Web. It powers about 3.3% of all websites’ content and articles. Our code analysis solution RIPS detected a previously unknown LDAP injection vulnerability in the login controller. This one vulnerability could allow remote attackers to leak the super user password with blind injection techniques and to fully take over any Joomla! <= 3.7.5 installation within seconds that uses LDAP for authentication. Joomla! has fixed the vulnerability in the latest version 3.8.

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.