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A Letter from Linuxland -- Part 1

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Linux

There are a million reasons to install Linux, and as many not to bother. The days when I actually enjoyed making a computer work through sheer force of will have gone: there's too much to do with the things these days to worry about making it happen. If you play a lot of games, then Linux isn't an option, but if you spend your days whooping through the Internet like a gibbon in the rainforest canopy, then open source will keep you happy. If like me you do a little of a lot of things, then going free is an intriguing idea that may be more trouble than its worth. You know where you are with Windows, even if it's not exactly where you want to be today. It's good enough.

Until now. I don't know exactly what bit of Microsoft corporate madness finally provoked the allergic reaction that swelled my anger gland. It could have been Windows Media Player offering to 'protect' my content with a smarmy message that smelled as bad as 'Crusher' Nobbs offering to 'protect' a pub. It might have been Windows Genuine Advantage slithering its way into my PC and lobbing my personal information back to Microsoft's HQ without telling me. It might have been waiting two minutes for my computer to start while a large and massively stupid lump of antivirus software declared itself the most important being in my world. Or it might have been another stonkingly arrogant statement from Steve Ballmer -- you know, the man who's proud that he bans his kids from owning iPods and using Google. There are many, many candidates for the last straw in the bale on this camel's back.

Whatever it was, it was suddenly too much.

Full Story.

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