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Fedora 'Rebrands'

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Red Hat
  • On being part of the Fedora community
  • On being part of the Fedora community

    Hi, everyone. As I am sure you know, I often say that the “Friends” value of the Fedora Foundations is the one that’s personally most important to me. I want to remind everyone that when you are a Fedora contributor — a developer, a writer, an advocate, or any other role in our community — it’s important to keep the spirit of “be excellent to each other” in mind.

    Our Code of Conduct says: members of the Fedora community should be respectful when dealing with other contributors as well as with people outside the Fedora community and with users of Fedora. Please be extra-aware of how your actions even outside of our mailing lists, forums, and channels reflect upon Fedora as a whole.

    We just adopted a new vision statement: The Fedora Project envisions a world where everyone benefits from free and open source software built by inclusive, welcoming, and open-minded communities. We are continually working to make Fedora an inclusive place where all are welcome. I wish it did not need to be said, but here it is: personal attacks, innuendo, and inciting language are examples of things that do not create a welcoming community, and will not be tolerated in Fedora. We understand that even friends can disagree at times, and that emotions can lead to escalation. The Code of Conduct ticket queue is a safe place where folks can open up an issue to resolve difficult situations. Please make use of it if you ever feel it is warranted.

  • Fedora Adopts A New Vision Statement

    Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller has sent out a reminder to Fedora contributors to "be excellent to each other" while announcing the project has a new vision statement.

Come Socialize at the Fedora Social Hour!

  • Come Socialize at the Fedora Social Hour!

    COVID-19 is getting pretty real, with social distancing, shelter-in-place, and lockdown orders in effect in areas around the world. Some of us are perhaps getting sick of the company we are stuck with, and others of us are feeling pretty isolated without any company at all.

    Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller and contributor Neal Gompa had the idea for a Fedora Social Hour where folks could video chat in and get a little (virtual) human contact and conversation.

    Sound like a welcome break from isolation to you? Check out the details below!

Fedora at SCaLE 18x (2020)

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