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Linux 5.7

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Linux

So we had a fairly calm last week, with nothing really screaming
"let's delay one more rc". Knock wood - let's hope we don't have
anything silly lurking this time, like the last-minute wifi regression
we had in 5.6..

But embarrassing regressions last time notwithstanding, it all looks
fine. And most of the discussion I've seen the last week or two has
been about upcoming features, so the merge window is now open and I'll
start processing pull requests tomorrow as usual. But in the meantime,
please give this a whirl.

We've got a lot of changes in 5.7 as usual (all the stats look normal
- but "normal" for us obviously pretty big and means "almost 14
thousand non-merge commits all over, from close to two thousand
developers"), So the appended shortlog is only the small stuff that
came in this last week since rc7.

Go test,

                 Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.7 Kernel Released With New Apple Driver, Official Intel Gen12 Graphics

The 5.7 kernel is out

Linux Kernel 5.7 Officially Released, This Is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.7 Officially Released, This Is What’s New

    Seven weeks in development, the Linux 5.7 kernel is finally here. This series brings many goodies for Linux users, including a new and improved exFAT file system implementation, improved perf cgroup profiling, as well as a thermal-aware scheduler that should increase the performance.

    Security-wise, Linux kernel 5.7 also introduces ARM Kernel Pointer Authentication for the ARM64 (AArch64) architecture to protect the kernel against return-oriented programming attacks and a new LSM (Linux Security Module) for BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter) programs called bpf-lsm.

Linux Kernel 5.7 Released

  • Linux Kernel 5.7 Released: The Top 10 New Features You Should Know

    v5.7 introduces several new enhancements to 64-bit ARM architecture such as ARM Activity Monitors (AMU) extension support and in-kernel pointer authentication which was earlier restricted to userspace.

    Furthermore, kernel 5.7 also adds support for new ARM architecture-based devices and SoCs. It includes Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 and PINE64’s Pinebook Pro laptop, PineTab tablet, and PinePhone mobile phone.

    [...]

    Speaking of the other filesystems, Linux 5.7 brings Zstd compression support to the F2FS (Flash-Friendly File System) filesystem. Not only that, but F2FS now also has a new kernel ioctl and mount time display in debugfs. Here is a pull request that contains all enhancements, cleanups, and other bug fixes for F2FS in Kernel 5.7.

    With Linux 5.7, XFS also sees a number of changes coming in two parts for code clean-ups, improved metadata validation, and other bug fixes. The major highlight in XFS is the initial preparation for online repair and filesystem checking.

Linux 5.7 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux 5.7 Released, This is What’s New

    Linux 5.7 has arrived, serving as the latest mainline release of the Linux Kernel — but what’s changed? Well, in this post we recap the new features and core changes bundled up inside this kernel update.

    As per tradition Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux 5.7 in an email to the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML), where he says: “We’ve got a lot of changes in 5.7 as usual (all the stats look normal – but “normal” for us obviously pretty big and means “almost 14 thousand non-merge commits all over, from close to two thousand developers)”.

    Fun fact: Linus recently switched from Intel to AMD, which he hasn’t used for quite a while!

    While the Linux 5.7 kernel will likely be available for testing in Ubuntu 20.10 during development it’s not yet clear precisely which kernel version will be offered in the final stable release come October (and thus be back-ported to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS as a HWE update in 20.04.2 LTS).

SD Times news digest: Linux 5.7

Linux Kernel 5.7 Released

  • Linux Kernel 5.7 Released

    According to the usual Sunday night schedule, Linus Torvalds released Linux kernel 5.7 on May 31. His note on the Linux kernel mailing list was typically terse, saying “it all looks
    fine.”

    Torvalds also noted that the almost 14,000 non-merge commits from nearly 2,000 developers seemed normal. “We’ve got a lot of changes in 5.7 as usual – all the stats look normal – but “normal” for us obviously pretty big,” he said.

Top 10 New Features in Linux Kernel 5.7

  • Top 10 New Features in Linux Kernel 5.7

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux Kernel 5.7 after seven weeks of development. The release announcement comes as a piece of exciting news as it brings a host of new features for the hardware manufacturers as well as the developers.

    Let’s take a deep dive and look at what’s new in the Linux kernel 5.7 so that you can decide if you need to upgrade your Linux kernel on your PC. Typically, most of the end-users don’t always have to update their kernels manually unless they know what they are doing. Upgrading Kernel is not still a smooth process, and one must exercise caution before doing so.

Kernel 5.7: Forging ahead, despite COVID-19

  • Kernel 5.7: Forging ahead, despite COVID-19

    While the previous kernel was released at a time when many countries had already been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, most of the work was actually completed before the spread of the SARS-Cov-2 virus. Kernel 5.7 development, on the other hand, took place after the lockdown measures were introduced.

    Despite these significant changes, the kernel community has remained strong, forging ahead thanks to remote working already being the de facto mode of collaboration. Of course, there are, and continue to be, many people in the kernel community directly affected by the pandemic, and by no means should we forget the hardships these last few months have brought.

Collabora’s Contributions to Linux Kernel 5.7

  • Collabora’s Contributions to Linux Kernel 5.7

    Released last week by Linus Torvalds, Linux kernel 5.7 is here with a new and improved exFAT file system implementation, ARM64 Kernel Pointer Authentication, a new BPF-based Linux Security Module, new features for x86 CPUs, improved perf cgroup profiling, and much more.

    As usual, Collabora had an important part of the Linux kernel 5.7 development, adding much-needed encoding improvements to the Hantro JPEG driver, more work around the runtime bus format negotiation between elements of a DRM bridge chain, and support of automatic loading of i3c modules.

    They also addressed various bugs in the Virtual Media Controller Driver (VIMC) and Rockchip ISP V1 (rkisp1) driver, converted more Device Tree bindings to YAML, further improved support for Chrome OS devices, and added a trace event for the DRM (Direct Rendering Manager) scheduler.

Linux 5.7 Released – Main Changes, Arm, MIPS and RISC-V Arch

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So the world has been hectic lately, dunno if you’ve seen the news, but that means that I didn’t publish an update since my previous KF6 progress report back in February! Now that the lock down has been (temporarily?) lifted where I live and that things are a bit less crazy, it’s time for an update. An actual Qt 6 is not published yet and we didn’t branch for KF6 yet either. Still as can be seen on the KF6 Workboard there are plenty of tasks in our backlog which can be acted upon now. No need to wait to participate, all the work done now will make the transition to KF6 easier later on anyway. What has been done since the last post? On the workboard, we currently have 22 tasks in progress and 4 tasks done. Clearly that’s not a huge activity in more than four months but the state of the world might explain it in part. Obviously with so little tasks done, they mostly revolve around our usual suspects. If you fancy becoming one of the unsung heroes of KDE, come and help working tasks from the KF6 Workboard! More hands are needed and right now is a good time to discover it and get into it than when Qt6 will be released. Indeed, when Qt6 will be around it will be much less quiet around here. :-) Read more

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