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What's Wrong with Linux?

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Linux

Linux servers are ready for prime time and most web sites run on them. This article examines Linux desktop problems.

I've used Linux for a little over a year now, from the perspective of a power Windows user. I can do almost anything on my Linux system that a Windows XP or Mac user can do on his system. My system is reliable, stable, and far safer from malware/intrusion than Microsoft products. I can watch almost any multimedia product, same as a Windows or Mac user. I have both a drive mirror and DVD-R backup sets for backup.

I run Windows on my Linux workstation via Win4Lin emulation, which allows me to run an actual copy of Windows concurrently with Linux. But all I really run on Windows day to day are Eudora (email), Microsoft Office, and graphics software—everything else I do in Linux.

Is the Linux Desktop Ready for You?

Full Story.

Use Linspire

If you use a newbie friendly like Linspire, Linux is actually easier to use than Windows, if you are doing anything beyond just playing games on your computer. As far as being as easy to use as the Mac, maybe in the KDE 4.0 era and whatever Gnome comes up with at that time.

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