Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

ECIS Provides A History of Microsoft's AntiCompetitive Behavior

Filed under
Microsoft

You have to read this paper! Microsoft - A History of Anticompetitive Behavior and Consumer Harm [PDF], and it's from the European Committee for Interoperable Systems, or ECIS. ECIS has submitted it in support of the EU Commission's recent preliminary findings, on January 15, 2009, that Microsoft violated antitrust law by tying IE to Windows.

It is, to the best of my knowledge, the first time that the issue of Microsoft's patent threats against Linux have been presented to a regulatory body as evidence of anticompetitive conduct.

It presents a history, albeit not totally comprehensive, of some of the notable anticompetitive conduct from the past, like against DR-DOS and Netscape and WordPerfect, but it also presents current issues, including the saga of how ISO/IEC DIS 29500, formerly known as OOXML, got approved as a standard:

rest here




TuxMachines ought to publish items critical of Microsoft

TuxMachines ought to publish items critical of Microsoft more often. Linux sites should not be shy to show what the single most vicious company is doing to stifle GNU/Linux adoption.

re: critical of MS

But that's what your site is for. Big Grin

MS FUD

Or you could loosen up your tinfoil hat a bit.

It's sad that Linux & Company can't win market share against Microsoft - even when Linux gives away their product.

Perhaps function/stability/support/application support/unified GUI/decent UI/unified marketing/etc means more to the average user or business then the freebie stuff ranting fanboys promote.

I know if I knew nothing about Linux and saw Stallman do his rantomercial for GNU crap I'd immediately run and renew my Microsoft licenses and support contract.

You say this as if Linux IS

You say this as if Linux IS trying to compete for market share against Windows.

Who gives a rats patoot about Windows market share? it is what it is.

Perhaps there are some companies trying to use Linux to compete in the server market or even the desktop market against other OS's. RedHat, Suse, even Ubuntu.

Those are companies using Linux to compete and Linux as a whole has no say in how these companies market their individual products.

Linux as an OS, in and of itself, does not exist to compete or vie for market share, it exists to be what it is, regardless of what other OS's might also be available.

does Linux overall succeed at what it is intended to do? That should be the determining factor. Not marketshare. The market is full of products whose manufacturers use techniques to 'sell' a product that aren't worth the price of the ink used to advertise them. Do they get market share? Of course they do, not because it's a good product, but because someone had enough money to throw out in front of it.

This non-sensical argument of whether Linux overall gets or will get marketshare has more to do with advertising and vendor 'push' than whether it is as 'good' as another OS.

Linux has been documented, both officially and generally to be usable and effective in a variety of environments. It works. Let it go at that.

In terms of criticizing a company in regard to an OS this site does not exist to discuss, what's the point. The people who come to this site come to talk and read about Linux and getting the most out of Linux. If people are coming to a Linux site simply to bash a wholly different OS, they need to find an anti-MS or anti-Windows site, not a Linux one.

Linux has been used to hide a lot of BS carping about a company and OS that isn't the primary topic here.

The title says "TuxMachines" not "WinMachines".

Good point

Good point, I mostly agree.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

5 fundamental differences between Windows 10 and Linux

This comparison really only scratches the surface. And don't get me wrong, there are areas where Windows 10 bests Linux (few, but they do exist). In the end, however, the choice is yours. Chances are you'll be making the choice based on which platform will allow you get more work done and do so with a certain level of efficiency and reliability. I would highly recommend, to anyone, if Linux can enable you to get your work done...give it a go and see if you don't find it more dependable and predictable. Read more

Firefly COM dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. Read more

Games: Morphite, Mooseman, Arma, and PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller

  • Stylish FPS 'Morphite' released without Linux support, but it's coming
    Sadly, Morphite [Steam] has seen a delay with the Linux version. Thankfully, the developer was quick to respond and it's still coming.
  • The Mooseman, a short side-scrolling adventure just released for Linux
    In the mood for something a little out there? Well, The Mooseman [Steam] a short side-scroller might just hit the spot.
  • Arma 3 1.76 for Linux is planned, work on it to start "soon"
    Bohemia Interactive have announced in their latest "SITREP" that the Linux version of Arma 3 will be updated to the latest version of 1.76, work is set to start on it "soon".
  • Sony's PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller Now Supported in Fedora Linux, GNOME
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. The patches submitted by the developer to the Bluetooth packages in the latest Fedora Linux release promise to bring improvements to the way PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers are set up in the environment if you're using the GNOME desktop environment. Until now, to set up a DualShock 3 controller, users had to plug it in via USB, then disconnect it, and then press the "P" button on the joypad, which would have popped-up a dialog to confirm the Bluetooth connection. But this method had some quirks though.

Debian Development Reports

  • Free software log (July and August 2017)
    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years. After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125
    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.