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ECIS Provides A History of Microsoft's AntiCompetitive Behavior

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Microsoft

You have to read this paper! Microsoft - A History of Anticompetitive Behavior and Consumer Harm [PDF], and it's from the European Committee for Interoperable Systems, or ECIS. ECIS has submitted it in support of the EU Commission's recent preliminary findings, on January 15, 2009, that Microsoft violated antitrust law by tying IE to Windows.

It is, to the best of my knowledge, the first time that the issue of Microsoft's patent threats against Linux have been presented to a regulatory body as evidence of anticompetitive conduct.

It presents a history, albeit not totally comprehensive, of some of the notable anticompetitive conduct from the past, like against DR-DOS and Netscape and WordPerfect, but it also presents current issues, including the saga of how ISO/IEC DIS 29500, formerly known as OOXML, got approved as a standard:

rest here




TuxMachines ought to publish items critical of Microsoft

TuxMachines ought to publish items critical of Microsoft more often. Linux sites should not be shy to show what the single most vicious company is doing to stifle GNU/Linux adoption.

re: critical of MS

But that's what your site is for. Big Grin

MS FUD

Or you could loosen up your tinfoil hat a bit.

It's sad that Linux & Company can't win market share against Microsoft - even when Linux gives away their product.

Perhaps function/stability/support/application support/unified GUI/decent UI/unified marketing/etc means more to the average user or business then the freebie stuff ranting fanboys promote.

I know if I knew nothing about Linux and saw Stallman do his rantomercial for GNU crap I'd immediately run and renew my Microsoft licenses and support contract.

You say this as if Linux IS

You say this as if Linux IS trying to compete for market share against Windows.

Who gives a rats patoot about Windows market share? it is what it is.

Perhaps there are some companies trying to use Linux to compete in the server market or even the desktop market against other OS's. RedHat, Suse, even Ubuntu.

Those are companies using Linux to compete and Linux as a whole has no say in how these companies market their individual products.

Linux as an OS, in and of itself, does not exist to compete or vie for market share, it exists to be what it is, regardless of what other OS's might also be available.

does Linux overall succeed at what it is intended to do? That should be the determining factor. Not marketshare. The market is full of products whose manufacturers use techniques to 'sell' a product that aren't worth the price of the ink used to advertise them. Do they get market share? Of course they do, not because it's a good product, but because someone had enough money to throw out in front of it.

This non-sensical argument of whether Linux overall gets or will get marketshare has more to do with advertising and vendor 'push' than whether it is as 'good' as another OS.

Linux has been documented, both officially and generally to be usable and effective in a variety of environments. It works. Let it go at that.

In terms of criticizing a company in regard to an OS this site does not exist to discuss, what's the point. The people who come to this site come to talk and read about Linux and getting the most out of Linux. If people are coming to a Linux site simply to bash a wholly different OS, they need to find an anti-MS or anti-Windows site, not a Linux one.

Linux has been used to hide a lot of BS carping about a company and OS that isn't the primary topic here.

The title says "TuxMachines" not "WinMachines".

Good point

Good point, I mostly agree.

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