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Widget-enabled Internet radio gets faster, cheaper

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Linux
Hardware

The Chumby One moves up from the 350MHz Freescale i.MX21 processor found on the original Chumby (pictured at right), now called "Chumby Classic," to an unnamed 454MHz pro cessor, also based on an ARM architecture, says Ch umby. Like the Classic, the new version offers 64MB SDRAM, but in place of 64MB of NAND flash, it has advanced to a 2GB internal microSD card.

The 3.5-inch touchscreen appears to be the same 320 x 240 display, and the overall dimensions of the clock radio-like device are only slightly smaller, dropping the width by 1.5 inches to four, while gaining half an inch in the other two dimensions.

Other new features include an FM radio tuner and a volume knob, says Chumby. There is also a battery option that uses a standard rechargeable lithium ion battery, although it is only rated to last an hour per charge.

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