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Oracle Solaris, Linux, and OpenSolaris

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Linux

As the pennies start to fall in the Oracle/Sun merger we’re seeing a lot of fear and ignorance getting expressed as corporate confusion, insensitivity, and general silliness - the company’s websites, for example, now generally refer to Solaris as “Oracle Solaris” - naively falling in line with the IBM community press’s use of “Sun Solaris” in an apparently deliberate effort to ghettoize its user community.

Meanwhile lots of other people are happily spreading FUD about OpenSolaris or disguising attacks on Linux as speculation that Oracle will downgrade its Linux support.

Although much of this is deplorable, most of it is also just par for the course, effectively collateral damage as the players in two big organizations merge interests, the PR folk get left behind, and the winners and losers in each organizational sub-group slowly get sorted out.

The most difficult and mission critical component of this merger will, I think, come with respect to sorting out the two support organizations.

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OpenSolaris future assured by Oracle

h-online.com: At the OpenSolaris Annual Meeting, held on IRC, Oracle executive Dan Roberts has assured the community about the future of the open source version of Solaris. The statements, available as a log of the meeting, have led Peter Tribble, who had expressed concerns on the lack of communication, to conclude "rumours of its [OpenSolaris] death have been greatly exaggerated".

Roberts, making his comments in an official capacity, stated that "Oracle will continue to make OpenSolaris available as open source, and Oracle will continue to actively support and participate in the community".

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