Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Proprietary Linux software: A big dilemma for many Linux users

Filed under
Software

Recently something came up with one of the other sites I write for. I proposed an article about the Hamachi VPN client which had an outstanding version for Linux. The setup was incredibly simple, the software ran well, it was free, and it could save many a admin a lot of headaches in the setup of VPN servers. Problem was, the software was proprietary. Although there was no cost attached to the software, it wasn’t possible to download the source and do with it what you will.

I understand the point and, after a bit of argument, I relented. Of course I understand that, when given the choice between an open source and non-open source solution, the open source solution will almost always be more appealing. But this stance has one major catch: It hinders companies trying to make a living by creating software for the Linux operating system from doing just that. Let me put it more simply:

You have the choice between using Software A or Software B. Software A is free of charge and open source, but requires a bit of work to get up and running. Software A also has no support (other than forums and community). Software B is also free of charge, not open source, but allows you to purchase a support plan and offers a paid version with more features. Software B is also much easier to get up and running.

Which software do you choose?




re: Proprietary Linux Software

I purchased DemoRecorder when I couldn't get the quality (both audio and video, but primarily audio) I wanted for Linux screencasts.

Recordmydesktop, Istanbul, and xvidcap just didn't do the job I wanted.

So, I will purchase Linux proprietary software when the quality of the proprietary software is demonstrably better, and the price is within reason.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Open/Hacker Hardware

4MLinux 20.1 released.

This is a minor maintenance release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel. The release ships with the Linux kernel 4.4.34, which restores PAE support that "magically" disappeared in 4MLinux 20.0 (sorry :-). Additionally, some popular programs (Double Commander, Dropbox, Firefox, Java RE, Opera, PeaZip, Thunderbird, Wine) have been updated, too. Read more

Refracta 8.0 Is a Pint-Sized Powerhouse

Refracta is a somewhat obscure Linux distribution that offers exceptional functionality and stability. Obscurity is not always a bad thing when it comes to Linux distros. You can find some very worthwhile alternatives to your current operating system. Refracta is a big surprise in a small package. Many look-alike desktop distros are difficult to distinguish from run-of-the-mill garden varieties. Others offer new adopters something unique that makes using them fun and productive. Refracta is one of the few full-service Linux distros that makes an easy and more convenient replacement for pocket Linux options such as Puppy Linux. Not all Linux distros that install to a USB drive -- and have the ability to save files and system settings in a persistent mode -- work equally well. Read more

Clear Linux With Mesa 13 Is A Strong Match For Intel Linux Performance

When benchmarking Intel's Clear Linux distribution earlier this year we found its Intel graphics performance to be quite good and slightly faster than other Linux distributions even when Clear was using an older version of Mesa. Now with Clear Linux having switched to Mesa 13, I decided to run some fresh Intel OpenGL benchmarks on it compared to other distributions. Read more