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interview: Red Hat chief executive Matthew Szulik

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Linux
Interviews

Red Hat held its second annual Red Hat Summit in Nashville this week. At the event, vnunet.com sat down with the company's chief executive, Matthew Szulik, to talk about the firm's latest initiatives and future directions.

This interview with Matthew Szulik is available as an audio podcast on the Silicon Valley Sleuth blog.

Red Hat will contribute certification and testing tools to Fedora. Is this signalling an increased development focus within Red Hat?

I wouldn't say increased. I think it's responding to a continued set of needs that we've been hearing from customers and the open source community. Today you saw Red Hat responding to that. With the support of the Fedora board, we'll bring that to market as quickly as we can.

But if you look back at last year's Red Hat Summit, there was a lot of talk about middleware. Now it seems to be more of a developer focus.

Full Story.

In related news:

The software patent problem will get much worse before there will be any resolution, according to Red Hat deputy general counsel Mark Webbink.

That Story

Shares of Linux software provider Red Hat Inc. surged in Thursday's trading after a slew of analysts came away from the first day of an annual conference singing the company's praises and downplaying the threat of Oracle Corp.

That Story.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 will enter beta testing in late July and ship in December, executives said Wednesday.

Beta 1 of the server is slated to be available in late July and Beta 2 – which will incorporate the Fedora Core 6 build -- is planned for release in mid September, said Daniel Riek, a product manager for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, based in Westford, Mass.

That Story.

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