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Docker Shares, Celebrates

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Server
Software
  • Docker to Donate its Container Runtime, containerd, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Docker plans to donate its containerd container runtime to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to organizing a set of open source container-based cloud-native technologies.

    In December, Docker released as open source the code for containerd, which provides a runtime environment for Docker containers. By open sourcing this component of the Docker stack, the company wanted to assure users, partners, and other actors in the container ecosystem that the core container component would remain stable, and that the community would have a say in its advancement.

  • Docker at 4: The Container Revolution Continues

    The open-source Docker container project held events around the globe last week as it celebrated its fourth birthday. Docker is more popular than ever as the standard bearer for the container microservices DevOps movement, though Docker Inc. as a company now faces more challenges than ever before as well.

    Three years ago, I wrote about the first anniversary of Docker, predicting significant growth in 2014. As it turned out, I was right about the growth, though I was wrong about Docker Inc. Back in 2014, I had predicted that Docker Inc. would likely be acquired, but to date that hasn't happened—though there has been no shortage of speculation over the last three years.

    Docker Inc. and the open-source container ecosystem that Docker helped create have evolved significantly since 2014, and over the course of the project's four-year existence. This past year has arguably been the most significant yet for Docker Inc., both as a business and an open-source project.

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Raspberry Pi Alternatives

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