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M$ Claims Safer than Linux

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Microsoft
SUSE

Mike Nash claims microsoft is safer than Linux stating "Year-to-date for 2005, Microsoft has fixed 15 vulnerabilities affecting Windows Server 2003. In the same time period, for just this year, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 users have had to patch 34 vulnerabilities and SuSE Enterprise Linux 9 users have had to patch over 78 vulnerabilities." Did someone say biased and misleading statistics? Yep, safer huh?

Same ole Fud

Man they are living in a dream world. Windows is so insecure that 91 percent of users who run Windows have some kind of virus, spyware or trojans on them.

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