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Original Articles from 2009

  1. Should Pulseaudio Die? What do you think?* - Dec 29, 09
  2. Fedora 12 – A Popular Linux Distro You Might Want To Try - Dec 11, 09
  3. openSUSE 11.2 – For New Users and Pros Alike - Dec 7, 09
  4. Desktop Recording on my Laptop* - Nov 26, 09
  5. Timed downloads* - Nov 19, 09
  6. openSUSE 11.2: Let's wait for 11.3 - Nov 19, 09
  7. Benchmark Your System With PTS Desktop Live - Nov 18, 09
  8. 3 Sites To Help You Become A CommandLine Master - Nov 16, 09
  9. Hitch your wagon to a lizard: dist-upgrading openSUSE* - Nov 15, 09
  10. Paranoia and criticism, how it was meant and how it is taken* - Nov 12, 09
  11. Mandriva Linux 2010 – Perhaps The Best Linux Release All Year - Nov 10, 2009
  12. How To Secure Your D-Link Wireless Router - Nov 9, 2009
  13. GoblinX – An Alternative OS With 4 Different Flavors - Nov 2, 2009
  14. Machinarium - A Tasty Gaming Treat - Oct 29, 2009
  15. In Search of KDE 4 - Oct 15, 2009
  16. Sabayon Linux Five Point OH! - Oct 12, 2009
  17. Top 10 Linux Distributions of 2009 - Oct 12, 2009
  18. Puppy Linux 4.3 and Woof - Sep 30, 2009
  19. SAM Linux - Great little OS - Aug 31, 2009
  20. Quick Tip: Old games can't find /dev/dsp - Aug 22, 2009
  21. Linux Got Game! - Aug 19, 2009
  22. Will I Go Back?* - July 30, 2009
  23. Toorox - July 22, 2009
  24. One Linux to rule them all* - Jul 8, 2009
  25. The Ubuntu 1-click dist-upgrade (well, almost)* - Jun 30, 2009
  26. OpenSource Software Bounty Hunters"* - May 22, 2009
  27. Before Ubuntu Was SimplyMepis: A Long-Term Review - May 11, 2009
  28. Six New Mobile Devices Running Open Source - Apr 9, 2009
  29. A great new theme for PCLinuxOS 2009.1 - Apr 3, 2009
  30. PR Wars: Apple vs MS...Does Linux need to even bother?* - Apr 3, 2009
  31. SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 Feature Tour - Apr 1, 2009
  32. Taking your first Linux baby steps - Mar 24, 2009
  33. VectorLinux 6.0 - Mar 19, 2009
  34. KNOPPIX 6.0 - Feb 11, 2009
  35. How to add Awn main menu applet in AWN 0.3.2* - Feb 09, 2009
  36. Sabayon Linux 4 - Feb 05, 2009
  37. OpenSolaris distros - Jan 12, 2009
  38. XBMC* - Jan 11, 2009
  39. Easy Peasy Eeebuntu Netbooks* - Jan 8, 2009
  40. Slowly moving people to Linux via OpenSource Apps* - Jan 3, 2009
  41. Why the world isn't ready for Linux* - Dec 30, 2008

* - Posts by other contributers.










More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and OSI Leftovers (Openwashing PR)

  • Why you want labels for software, just like for food

    Here is my own synthesis, as simple as possible, of a much geekier post about a very geeky concept that, in an age where so much depends on how software is used AROUND you, becomes every year more important for everybody. A Software Bill of Materials (SBOM) is becoming an increasingly expected requirement from software releases. Reading through blog posts and social media, there still seems that some confusion persists about what an SBOM can/could do for your project.

  • The Linux Foundation makes record progress in addressing talent shortages

    The Linux Foundation summarises the progress made in 2021 towards its goal of ensuring anyone can start an open-source technology career.

  • EV charging software goes open source with Project Everest [Ed: There is no such this as "the Linux open-source foundation"; this is greenwashing and openwashing all-in-one]

    The development and expansion of the EV charging software ecosystem is a critical component to the mainstream adoption of electric vehicles. However, the industry has become complex and fragmented, with multiple isolated solutions and inconsistent technology standards. This slows and threatens the adoption of EVs. In response, PIONIX has developed a project called EVerest, an open-source software stack designed to establish a common base layer for a unified EV charging ecosystem. EVerest has gained some serious cred in the developer world, with its biggest support LF Energy (the Linux open-source foundation for the power systems sector). I spoke to the project’s brainchild, Dr. Marco Möller, managing director of PIONIX, to find out more.

  • Spotlight on Libre Space Foundation, OSI Associate Member

    Did you know that one of OSI’s members is leading the effort to take open source to infinity and beyond?! Libre Space Foundation (LSF) is a non-profit foundation registered in Greece whose vision is “an Open and Accessible Outer Space for all.” The organization works to promote, advance and develop free and open source technologies and knowledge for space. Recently, Libre Space Foundation, on behalf of the OpenSatCom.org activity of the European Space Agency, partnered with Inno3 to investigate open source development models in the satellite communications industry and share their findings in a report. As the authors explain, “..the SATCOM industry has been traditionally multiple vertical ecosystems and moved towards some standardization (through efforts like CCSDS, ECSS, DVB, etc.) on various of its parts. Yet it is far from an Open Ecosystem and specific actions should be taken to explore this direction for the benefit of the SATCOM industry.”

In defense of NIR

Shortly after I joined the Mesa team at Intel in the summer of 2014, I was sitting in the cube area asking Ken questions, trying to figure out how Mesa was put together, and I asked, “Why don’t you use LLVM?” Suddenly, all eyes turned towards Ken and myself and I realized I’d poked a bear. Ken calmly explained a bunch of the packaging/shipping issues around having your compiler in a different project as well as issues radeonsi had run into with apps bundling their own LLVM that didn’t work. But for the more technical question of whether or not it was a good idea, his answer was something about trade-offs and how it’s really not clear if LLVM would really gain them much. That same summer, Connor Abbott showed up as our intern and started developing NIR. By the end of the summer, he had a bunch of data structures a few mostly untested passes, and a validator. He also had most of a GLSL IR to NIR pass which mostly passed validation. Later that year, after Connor had gone off to school, I took over NIR, finished the Intel scalar back-end NIR consumer, fixed piles of bugs, and wrote out-of-SSA and a bunch of optimization passes to get it to the point where we could finally land it in the tree at the end of 2014. Initially, it was only a few Intel folks and Emma Anholt (Broadcom, at the time) who were all that interested in NIR. Today, it’s integral to the Mesa project and at the core of every driver that’s still seeing active development. Over the past seven years, we (the Mesa community) have poured thousands of man hours (probably millions of engineering dollars) into NIR and it’s gone from something only capable of handling fragment shaders to supporting full Vulkan 1.2 plus ray-tracing (task and mesh are coming) along with OpenCL 1.2 compute. Was it worth it? That’s the multi-million dollar (literally) question. 2014 was a simpler time. Compute shaders were still newish and people didn’t use them for all that much more than they would have used a fancy fragment shader for a couple years earlier. More advanced features like Vulkan’s variable pointers weren’t even on the horizon. Had I known at the time how much work we’d have to put into NIR to keep up, I may have said, “Nah, this is too much effort; let’s just use LLVM.” If I had, I think it would have made the wrong call. Read more

Databases: MongoDB/NoSQL, Firebird, and Rqlite/SQLite

  • Top 10 features of MongoDB Atlas | FOSS Linux

    MongoDB is a NoSQL general-purpose document-oriented database that is free to use. It is a scalable, versatile NoSQL document database platform built to overcome the constraints of previous NoSQL solutions and the approach of relational databases. It helps the user store and deals with an enormous amount of data. MongoDB’s horizontal scaling and load balancing capabilities have given application developers unprecedented flexibility and scalability. There are different MongoDB editions; however, we will focus on MongoDB Atlas in this article. MongoDB Atlas is a multi-cloud database service created by the MongoDB team. Atlas makes it easy to deploy and manage databases while also giving users the flexibility they need to develop scalable, high-performance global applications on the cloud providers of their choice. It is the world’s most popular cloud database for modern applications. Developers can use Atlas to deploy fully managed cloud databases on AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud. Developers can relax easily knowing that they have rapid access to the availability, scalability, and compliance they need for enterprise-level application development.

  • Node-firebird-driver-native version 2.4.0 has been released with a few features added.

    Node-firebird-driver-native version 2.4.0 has been released with a few features added.

  • Rqlite 7.0 Released For Distributed Relational Database Built Atop SQLite - Phoronix

    Rqlite 7.0 is now available as a lightweight, distributed relational database. This open-source database system for cluster setups is built atop SQLite while aiming to be easy-to-use and fault-tolerant.

Writing an open source GPU driver – without the hardware

After six months of reverse-engineering, the new Arm “Valhall” GPUs (Mali-G57, Mali-G78) are getting free and open source Panfrost drivers. With a new compiler, driver patches, and some kernel hacking, these new GPUs are almost ready for upstream. In 2021, there were no Valhall devices running mainline Linux. While a lack of devices poses an obvious obstacle to device driver development, there is no better time to write drivers than before hardware reaches end-users. Developing and distributing production-quality drivers takes time, and we don’t want users to be reliant on closed source blobs. If development doesn’t start until a device hits shelves, that device could reach “end-of-life” by the time there are mature open drivers. But with a head start, we can have drivers ready by the time devices reach end users. Let’s see how. Read more Also: Rosenzweig: Writing an open source GPU driver – without the hardware And related: Graphics Driver Changes Begin Lining Up For Linux 5.18