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About Tux Machines

Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story M$ settles IBM antitrust claims srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 2:38pm
Story Judge Won't Throw Out SCO Slander Lawsuit srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 2:52pm
Story BitTorrent may be next target for copyright cops srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 3:04pm
Story Beijing clinic ministers to online addicts srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 3:15pm
Story Now playing on Google: Matrix, Family Guy srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 3:21pm
Story Copycat lawsuits target Intel srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 3:37pm
Story Would M$ buy an adware firm? srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 3:46pm
Story Final Voting in 2005 Readers' Choice Awards srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 4:18pm
Story TUX Issue #4 Available srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 4:59pm
Story 50% Windows PCs Owned in 12 Minutes srlinuxx 01/07/2005 - 9:26pm

Is The New GPL a Target?

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LinuxToday: The language is complex, which some are already complaining about. Novell seems to have "gotten off," which others will complain about. Still others are looking at this license and the pressure Microsoft is trying to put on the community with its patent protection racket and are predicting doom and gloom in the form of a civil war.

Kernel and filesystem talks at OLS day two

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Linux Greg Kroah-Hartman kicked off the second day of the 9th annual Ottawa Linux Symposium with a talk entitled "Linux Kernel Development - How, What, How fast, and Who?" to a solidly packed main room with an audience of more than 400 people.

Mozilla Sheds Light on Calendar Effort

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internetnews: Mozilla's Thunderbird e-mail client has made relatively small inroads in the market versus Microsoft's Outlook e-mail program. Lightning and Sunbird are part of the Mozilla Calendar effort.

Is Red Hat Exchange DOA?

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InfoWorld: The Register reports that the Red Hat Exchange (RHX) "roars like a muted lamb". The Register's point is that RHX has met with a lukewarm reception to date. I wonder if The Register story is missing the point.

Sidux 2007-02 - A Review

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shift+backspace: The latest installment of Sidux, 2007-02 codenamed Tartaros, was released on May 28th of this year. Sidux is based on Debian, inparticularly Sid, which is the more modern, or development branch of Debian.

Time for a switch?

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Ubuntu Powerful, easy to use, bug-free - and best of all - FREE! Linux is becoming the Operating System of choice for many internet aficionados.

GPLv3 arrives, but nobody seems to care

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linux-watch: I've been following the evolution of this latest version of the seminal open-source license since it was a twinkle in Richard M. Stallman's eye. I have no no doubt that a lot of hard work by some incredibly bright people has gone into making this the best possible software license.


Fedora Board elections -- voting open

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LWN: Voting is open for the Fedora Board elections in which 3 of the 9 seats will be chosen. The candidates are Christopher Aillon, Dennis Gilmore, Bob Jensen, Brian Pepple, Jef Spaleta and Rahul Sundaram.

Google Desktop Search vs Tracker

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sheehantu: After reading Mohammad’s blog post about Google Desktop, I thought I’d take it for a spin since I’m a GDS fan when I’m on XP. Though I’ve only been using it for two days, I soon realized that I am going back to Tracker. Here’s why:

Batch Resize Images in Linux Using Imagemagick

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element14: Suppose you need to do a batch operation on a large set of pictures? Although Gimp is an extremely powerful tool for image editing and processing, it is still very time consuming to do a series of tasks on a large list of images in GIMP without wasting a lot of time.

GPLv3 license marks GNU's decline

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The Jem Report: The GNU General Public License version 3 is unleashed to the world today, ready and willing to conquer perceived problems with the legal system in the U.S. and other countries. The FSF tells us that the new restrictions in the GPLv3, on patents, patent licensing, and hardware capabilities, are there to make us more free.

Review: Xandros Linux 4.0 Professional

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Raiden's Realm: Xandros is a distribution of Linux descended from Debian and built on the Debian framework. Unlike Debian though, Xandros is built more with a profiteering mindset, a philosophy that has slowly alienated it from the Linux community, more so lately after their announced affiliation with Microsoft.

Making wireless work in Ubuntu

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kaki5: If network manager does not solve the problem, the first step should be to see which driver your wireless card needs. Do a search for your card on Google and in the Ubuntu Forums to find out which driver you need. Many of the drivers are already included in Ubuntu, but some newer drivers may not be present.

Free Software Foundation releases GPL 3

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After 18 months of revision, the Free Software Foundation has released version 3 of the General Public License (GPL).

Also: Novell's Position

When HASN'T Linux been at war?

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Penguin Pete: Let's make one thing perfectly clear: Microsoft wants Linux dead. Four words that tell you all you need to know about how Microsoft and Linux relate. Microsoft wants Linux dead. Write it down.

Ubuntu System Monitoring Tools

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InformIT: To keep your system in optimum shape, you need to be able to monitor it closely. Ubuntu provides a wealth of utilities designed to give you as little or as much feedback as you want. In this sample chapter, Paul and Andrew Hudson look at some of the basic monitoring tools and cover some tactics designed to keep your system up longer.

Schwartz mum on GPLv3, reveals licensing fantasy

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linuxworld: SAN FRANCISCO – Sun CEO Jonathan Schwartz showed up Thursday evening at the Burton Group Catalyst Conference and declared he would not answer questions about the GNU general public license version 3, but he did disclose his lifelong fantasy concerning open source licensing.

India's Kerala state goes open source

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ZDNet: According to a statement, the Kerala government has identified free and open-source software (FOSS) as a major strategic component in its efforts to build an inclusive information society.

Jim Lacey, CEO, Linux Professional Institute

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Interviews How does an enterprise ensure that its staff has the skills necessary for Linux? One answer is skills certification. That's where the Linux Professional Institute (LPI) comes in. LPI, founded in 1999, is a non-profit entity that runs a core Linux certification program called the LPIC (Linux Professional Institute Certification), which is offered around the globe.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google’s Open Source Report Card Highlights Game-Changing Contributions
    Ask people about Google’s relationship to open source, and many of them will point to Android and Chrome OS — both very successful operating systems and both based on Linux. Android, in particular, remains one of the biggest home runs in open source history. But, as Josh Simmons from Google’s Open Source Programs Office will tell you, Google also contributes a slew of useful open source tools and programs to the community each year. Now, Google has issued its very first “Open Source Report Card,” as announced by Simmons on the Google Open Source Blog. "We're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Simmons.
  • Nino Vranešič: Open Source Advocate and Mozilla Rep in Slovenia
    “My name is Nino Vranešič and I am connecting IT and Society,” is what Nino says about himself on LinkedIn. The video is a little hard to understand in places due to language differences and (we think) a slow or low-bandwidth connection between the U.S.-based Zoom servers and Eastern Europe, a problem that crops up now and then in video conversation and VOIP phone calls with people in that part of the world, no matter what service you choose. But Vranešič is worth a little extra effort to hear, because it’s great to learn that open source is being used in lots of government agencies, not only in Slovenia but all over Europe. And aside from this, Vranešič himself is a tres cool dude who is an ardent open source volunteer (“Mozilla Rep” is an unpaid volunteer position), and I hope I have a chance to meet him F2F next time he comes to a conference in Florida — and maybe you’ll have a chance to meet him if he comes to a conference near you.
  • MySQL and database programming for beginners
    Dave Stokes has been using MySQL for more than 15 years and has served as its community manager since 2010. At All Things Open this year, he'll give a talk about database programming for newbies with MySQL. In this interview, he previews his talk and shares a few helpful resources, required skills, and common problems MySQL beginners run into.
  • Nadella's trust talk is just so much hot air
    Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella appears to have an incredibly short memory. Else he would be the last person who talks about trust being the most pressing issue in tech in our times. Over the last year, we have been treated to a variety of cheap tricks by Microsoft, attempting to hoodwink Windows users left, right and centre in order to get them to upgrade to Windows 10. After that, talking about trust sounds odd. Very odd. Microsoft does not have the best reputation among tech companies. It is known for predatory practices, for being convicted as a monopolist, and in recent times has been trying to cultivate a softer image as a company that is not as rapacious as it once was. That has, in large measure, come about as its influence and rank in the world of computing have both slipped, with other companies like Apple, Facebook and Google coming to dominate.
  • If you wish, you may rebuild all dports to use non-base SSL library of your choice
  • DragonFlyBSD Continues LibreSSL Push, OpenSSL To Be Dropped
    DragonFlyBSD is now defaulting to LibreSSL throughout its operating system stack and is planning to completely remove OpenSSL in the near future. Last month DragonFlyBSD began using LibreSSL by default while that effort has continued. OpenSSL is no longer being built by default and in about one month's time the OpenSSL support will be completely stripped from the DragonFly tree.
  • Ranking the Web With Radical Transparency
    Ranking every URL on the web in a transparent and reproducible way is a core concept of the Common Search project, says Sylvain Zimmer, who will be speaking at the upcoming Apache: Big Data Europe conference in Seville, Spain. The web has become a critical resource for humanity, and search engines are its arbiters, Zimmer says. However, the only search engines currently available are for-profit entities, so the Common Search project is creating a nonprofit engine that is open, transparent, and independent. We spoke with Zimmer, who founded Jamendo, dotConferences, and Common Search, to learn more about why nonprofit search engines are important, why Apache Spark is such a great match for the job, and some of the challenges the project faces.
  • A look inside the 'blinky flashy' world of wearables and open hardware
    While looking at the this year's All Things Open event schedule, a talk on wearables and open hardware caught my eye: The world of the blinky flashy. Naturally, I dug deeper to learn what it was all about.
  • Why Perl is not use for new development , most of time use for maintenance and support projects ?
    There has been a tendency amongst some companies to play a “wait and see” attitude towards Perl, but the Perl market appears to have stabilized in the past couple of years and more companies appear to be returning to Perl. As one of our clients explained to me when I asked why they chose Perl “We’re tired of being bitten by hype.”

And More Security Leftovers

  • The NyaDrop Trojan for Linux-running IoT Devices
  • Flaw resides in BTB helps bypass ASLR
  • Thoughts on the BTB Paper
    Though the attack might have some merits with regards to KASLR, the attack on ASLR is completely debunked. The authors of the paper didn't release any supporting code or steps for independent analysis and verification. The results, therefore, cannot be trusted until the authors fully open source their work and the work is validated by trusted and independent third parties.
  • Spreading the DDoS Disease and Selling the Cure
    Earlier this month a hacker released the source code for Mirai, a malware strain that was used to launch a historically large 620 Gbps denial-of-service attack against this site in September. That attack came in apparent retribution for a story here which directly preceded the arrest of two Israeli men for allegedly running an online attack for hire service called vDOS. Turns out, the site where the Mirai source code was leaked had some very interesting things in common with the place vDOS called home.

Blockchain and FOSS

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.