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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 6:34am
Story Happily Announcing Mageia 5.1 Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 9:20am
Story Mofo Linux: The Raw Materials for Security Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 11:06am
Story Chapeau 24 Cancellara - Same same but different Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 11:12am
Story Parental Controls for Linux Unleashed Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 11:19am
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 11:30am
Story Fedora 25 Review: A Stable Release, But Slightly Slow to Boot (on rotational disks) Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 11:32am
Story Mozilla Reports 2015 Revenue of $421.3M Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 11:37am
Story Moving From Microsoft to GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 12:53pm
Story Arduino-Compatible RISC-V and More Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:21pm

Choosing a Linux Distro, Part 2: Favorite Flavors

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider: "Each Linux distro comes with its own powers and problems, and to say which one you should use would be tantamount to answering, 'What kind of car should I drive?'" said Scott Whitney of Journyx. Whitney has a strong view about not getting too fanatical over the differences in Linux distros. The particular flavor you select will matter less than the fact that you are not using the Mac or Windows platforms.

Simple, fast administration with Webmin

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Linux has so many tools, settings, parameters, and configuration files to learn that administering your box can be a challenge. Webmin, a Web-based comprehensive administration tool for Linux, can help you get on your way.

Restoring and updating the ASUS Eee Linux PC

iTWire: Well, I’ve been hornswaggled. My lovely brand-new ASUS Eee from Myer may have been a shop-soiled demo model. It wasn’t a virgin system but one that had played the field with many. Never worry: here’s how to take the ASUS Eee back to the complete factory image at any time, along with how to update the apps and Xandros Linux distro that it uses.

Review: Pardus Linux 2007.2

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: Pardus Linux is a distribution built from scratch rather than from any one particular existing distribution. Born in 2005 through funding and development provided by the Scientific & Technological Research Council of Turkey, it's grown quickly and become a distribution worth taking a good long look at.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Differences between European and US adoption of open source

  • Ubuntu Releases Alpha Version of Server 8.04
  • Embracing PCLinuxOS and Open Source
  • Linux defector says RHEL zero, Sun Solaris hero
  • Liferea: an RSS reader for GNOME
  • Tour of the Ubuntu Applications (2007)
  • Review: Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon takes on Mac OS X Leopard for the OS of the Year Part 1
  • Tech charities to consider this giving season
  • Video: Alan Cox and the state of free software
  • Klik2 RC to be around in February 2008
  • Suing Over Open Source
  • AGEIA Responds, Talks PhysX On Linux

A look at UHU-Linux 2.1 RC2

Filed under
Linux

beranger: More than one year ago, I reviewed UHU-Linux 2.0, and I very much liked it. Now, when UHU-Linux 2.1 is about to be released (I don't understand Hungarian, so I can't read their forums, but I suspect they want to release before Christmas), I tested UHU-Linux 2.1 RC2 (released on 12/16), downloaded from here: uhu-linux-2.1-rc2-dvd.iso.

Dragon Player 2.0 Alpha 1 released

Filed under
KDE

monroe.nu: So I've decided to rename Codeine/Video Player to Dragon Player. Its named in honor of KDE's mascot Konqui of course. I've also gone ahead and made a release, Dragon Player 2.0 Alpha 1.

Also: First panorama in Krita

Can We Avoid the Great Schism?

Filed under
OSS

Gyn Moody: Choice is an important element of free software, so it's perhaps no surprise that even at the level of the desktop environment there is more than one offering. But the main alternatives – KDE and GNOME – represent more than just a way of placing icons on a screen. Nowhere is that more evident than in their respective views on Microsoft's OOXML document standard, which are very far apart – perhaps dangerously so.

For Your Business: GNOME or KDE?

Filed under
Software

matt hartley: I am writing this piece in hopes of sharing what each desktop offering has to provide and which of these options makes the most sense for your business.

Firefox 3 Beta 2 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

developer.mozilla.org: Firefox 3 Beta 2 is now available for download. This is the tenth developer milestone focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 3.

Dell Adds Ubuntu 7.10 and Built-In DVD playback

Filed under
Ubuntu

direct2dell.com: Today, we're adding Ubuntu 7.10 (a.k.a Gutsy Gibbon) to the Dell Consumer Linux line-up for customers in the United States. It will also be available on the Inspiron 530 in England, France, and Germany later this week.

GNOME, OOXML, and Half-Truths Colliding in the Night

Filed under
OSS

Bruce Byfield: The average user probably hasn't even heard of Open Document Format (ODF) or Microsoft Office Open XML (OOXML). With both formats candidates for being the ISO standard that becomes the norm for interoperability between office suites, emotions were already running high. However, this issue has been sidetracked by a debate about whether the GNOME Foundation has betrayed or assisted the community by being involved with the development of OOXML at all.

Cooking with Linux - Still Searching for the Ultimate Linux Distro?

Filed under
Linux

Marcel Gagné: What distribution are you loading up today, François? Are you having trouble finding something you like? You like them all but you just can't choose, eh? Well, mon ami.

Open Source Challenge part 10: The verdict.

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Ten parts ago we embarked on this journey to see just how well Linux, and specifically Ubuntu, would handle being the sole operating system on my system and if it would handle everything I needed to do from work to play, day to day.

Traffic Officer Says He Saw No Blood on Reiser's Car Seat

Filed under
Reiser

wired: A police officer testified in the Hans Reiser murder trial Tuesday he pulled over the defendant for a traffic violation nine days after the Linux programmer's wife went missing and noticed no signs the vehicle was used to dispose of a body.

Perl 5.10 for Perl's 20th birthday

Filed under
Software

oreillynet.com: Perl 1 was released to the public by Larry Wall 20 years ago today. To celebrate, Perl5Porters have released Perl5.10, the latest stable version of Perl 5. Happy Birthday Perl!

National Boards to Vote NO for OOXML at ISO

Filed under
OSS

fanaticattack.com: There will be a BRM (Ballot resolution meeting) in Geneva on 25-29 February 2008 to answer the comments by National Standard Boards on OOXML and to resolve issues.

Linux Networking Cookbook: Tasty Linux recipes

Filed under
Reviews

linux-watch: Even before I picked up Unix, I worked on networks. While networking has gotten simpler, it's almost all TCP/IP now instead of Arcnet, Token-Ring and a half dozen dusty wiring and protocol schemes. The services that use networking have gotten ever more powerful and more complicated. That's why a book like Carla Schroder's Linux Networking Cookbook is so valuable.

Ubuntu 7.10: A warm and fuzzy Linux or a slightly less geeky upgrade for early adopters?

Filed under
Ubuntu

laptopmag.com: If you’ve been curious about Linux but fearful of installing the open-source OS on a laptop, then Ubuntu 7.10 will eliminate all excuses. This graphical and very friendly version of the OS is free, looks and plays very much like Mac/Windows, and runs a surprisingly vast array of programs from the open-source community.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Creating Snort Rules with EnGarde

  • Split and Merge PDF Documents with pdfsam
  • HowTo: KDocker/AllTray - System Tray Docking (Fedora)
  • Mobile phone management under Linux
  • How to turn your spreadsheet into a database for mail merges in OpenOffice
  • How To Install KDE 4 RC 2 in Ubuntu
  • using a guardian to ensure your lamp site is always up
  • Installing Video Driver and Compiz for ATi Radeon Xpress 1100 on Ubuntu 7.10 and Fedora 8
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • [Video] Linux Audio Programs Compared 2017
    I made this video for those that are new to, or just interested in making music on the Linux OS. I go over the features, goods and bads of Rosegarden, LMMS, Ardour, Mixbus, and EnergyXT, as well as touch on Qtractor. I don't don't go much into details of the particular versions I am using, but the video was made in the early part of 2017 and I'm running Ubuntu 16.04LTS.
  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux
    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.
  • Komorebi: A New Way To Enhance Your Desktop Using Animated/Parallax Wallpapers
    In past there were applications that allowed us to run videos/Gif as wallpaper on the desktop and make desktop look much cooler but than all of sudden the development of such Apps stopped and I can't name any App that exist for this purpose. Komorebi is fairly new application designed to make your desktop experience much better and make desktop cool as well, we can say it is kind of 'live wallpaper' situation here or 3D wallpaper. It is developed by Abe Masri and available under GPL license for free.
  • Stacer Sytem Optimizer: A Must Have Application For Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are multiple ways to optimize your Linux, the most geeky way is using Terminal, there are also applications available that performs such actions like Bleachbit, Ubuntu cleaner and so on. Stacer is simple, open-source, quick and new application designed to offer you all-in-one optimizer for your Ubuntu/Linux Mint (It's alternative to CCleaner but only for Linux).
  • Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux
    Long years ago, we've talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.
  • Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More
    Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes. For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more. It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.
  • Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys
    Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser. The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.
  • Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA
    Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).
  • Terminix Terminal Emulator Renamed To Tilix, Sees New Bugfix Release
    [Quick update] Terminix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator, has been renamed to Tilix due to some trademark issues.

today's howtos

Games and CodeWeavers/Wine

  • A Snapshot of Linux Gamers, Just One Year Ago
    It’s about time we share the analysis of that Q1 2016 survey (fielding occured in March last year), especially as we are about to launch the Q1 2017 one pretty, pretty soon. That way we will be able to compare how things have changed over the course of 12 months. As usual, the whole disclaimer about online surveys is valid here (data is only as good as your n size, the appropriateness of your sampling, and the quality of the responses, etc…), but assuming it’s not all that bad and all that unreliable, let’s dig in the results. As a reminder, most of the respondents for this survey were recruited through the r/linux and r/linux_gaming subreddits, as well as the readership of BoilingSteam. This is not our first survey, and you can see our previous ones done in the second quarter of 2015, and the following one in the last quarter of 2015.
  • Slime-san Coming To PC, Mac and Linux
    Headup Games and Fabraz proudly announce their upcoming action-platformer Slime-san for PC, Mac and Linux via Steam & Humble Bundle. Console releases will follow soon after. Jump and slime your way through 100 levels in a unique 5-colored, pixelated world and escape from a giant worm’s innards. Get your shopping done in Slumptown, a town full of survivors within the worm. Unlock different play styles, outfits, shaders and even multiplayer mini-games! Slime-san is developed by Fabraz, an independent development studio that also released the critically-acclaimed games Cannon Crasha and Planet Diver. Slime-san was minding his own business, sliming around in a peaceful forest when suddenly…A giant worm appeared and gobbled him up! Now deep within the worm’s belly, Slime-san has to face a decision: Be digested by the incoming wall of stomach acid... Or jump, slide and slime his way through the worm's intestines and back out its mouth!
  • CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 16.2.0
  • The Wine Revolution is ON!
    As you know Codeweavers (and other WINE contributors) have been working on DX11 support for a while – they were supposed to have DX11 support by the end of 2016, but as with all complex projects, timelines tend to slip and only very DX11 titles could run a few months ago. Since then, there was no major announcement, but it seems that the progress has been very significant in the recent WINE versions (2.3 is already out).

Leftovers: KDE