Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 26 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What’s New in Pop!_OS 20.10 Rianne Schestowitz 5 26/10/2020 - 7:41pm
Story Single Points of Failure and Proprietary Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub) Roy Schestowitz 7 26/10/2020 - 7:34pm
Story IBM/Red Hat: Mainframes History, Fwupd 1.5 Released, and Lots of Stuff Outsourced to Microsoft (GitHub) Roy Schestowitz 1 26/10/2020 - 7:32pm
Story ext4 (and FUSE) on FreeBSD Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 7:27pm
Story Open Hardware Projects With Arduino Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 7:22pm
Story Latest Security Patches and Reproducible Builds Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 7:03pm
Story Exploring Vim: The 18 Best Vim Books To Improve Your Vim Fu Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 6:57pm
Story Joplin and webdav Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 6:45pm
Story Programming/Development Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 6:40pm
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Is Coming on November 4th with Better Support for Android 9 Devices Marius Nestor 26/10/2020 - 6:21pm

Wikiman: An Offline Search Engine For Arch Linux, Gentoo Wiki, And More

Filed under
OSS

Official documentation of applications or commands is always the best way to learn about them if you want to know every detail, which a blog or article can’t provide.

And in the Linux community, we can’t deny Arch Wiki is truly a go-to place for anything you want to learn about Linux. Besides Arch, there are other documentations as well which you may also want to prefer like Gentoo or FreeBSD.

So, whether you want to know about a command or jargon in Linux, you can refer to any of the Wiki sites available. But if you’re looking for something that can provide documentation not only of Arch Linux but also of Gentoo, FreeBSD, and others to read in an offline mode, meet Wikiman.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, GNU World Order, Linux in the Ham Shack and Linux Action News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Episode 221 – Security, magic, and FaceID – Open Source Security

    Josh and Kurt talk about how to get started in security. It’s like the hero’s journey, but with security instead of magic. We then talk about what Webkit bringing Face ID and Touch ID to the browsers will mean.

  • GNU World Order 377

    Fedora Silverblue.

  • LHS Episode #375: No Deliveries | Linux in the Ham Shack

    Welcome to the 375th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topics episode, the hosts discuss the FCC relocating its offices, Logbook of the World, the new FST4 mode, Peertube, Hashicorp, RustyLinux, Ubuntu DragonOS, QRadioLink and much more. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have a wonderful week.

  • Linux Action News 160

    Ubuntu 20.10 is out, with official Raspberry Pi 4 desktop support. We try it out and report back. And our thoughts on the youtube-dl takedown.

    Plus Edge is out for Linux, and PayPal gets bitcoin fever.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Chinese Laptop Featuring New 14nm Loongsoon 3A4000 CPU Appears

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Due to this laptop being in the Chinese market, Windows is not supported at all. It only runs Chinese "domestic operating systems" that are typically modified versions of Linux. Fortunately, this does mean you can install any Linux flavor you want on the laptop, which can be handy if you don't want to run China-specific apps only.

Read more

Modberry 500 CM4 DIN Rail Industrial Computer Features Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

We’ve been writing about Techbase Modberry industrial embedded computers with DIN-Rail enclosures such as Modberry M500 or M2000 for several years. Most of their systems are powered by SBC’s like Raspberry Pi 4 or AAEON Up Squared, but they’ve also made models based on Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, and with the launch of Raspberry Pi CM4, the company has now introduced Modberry 500 CM4 industrial computer powered by Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 with up to 8GB RAM and 32GB eMMC flash.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Font And Line Settings In Doom Emacs - YouTube

    I am going to cover a few parts of my Doom Emacs config. Specifically, I am going to talk about my settings for fonts and lines. I also talk about what the fringe is and how you enable or disable the fringe.

  • RPKI validation with OpenBSD's rpki-client and Cloudflare's gortr

    This article documents how to install rpki-client (an RPKI relying party software, the actual validator) and gortr (which implements the RPKI to Router protocol) on Debian 10 to provide RPKI validation to routers. If you are using testing or unstable then you can just skip the part about apt pinnings.

  • How To Install Ionic Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Ionic Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Ionic Framework is helpful for building Android and iOS programs faster. You must install those applications to create a hybrid mobile application.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Ionic Framework on a Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Configure NGINX as TCP/UDP Load Balancer in Linux

    In this article, we will learn how to configure NGINX as TCP and UDP Load balancer in linux for the applications deployed in Kubernetes cluster.

  • 8 Ways to Check CPU Clock Speed on Linux

    Learn different ways to check cpu clock speed in Linux. Linux system has many tools to grab processor information and grab its speed.

  • How to create Cron Jobs on Linux | FOSS Linux

    Creating and editing a cron job the most amazing part in Linux, where you don't need to restart cron or even your PC after creating or editing a cron job.

  • How to Install Ruby on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux - Linux Concept

    Nowadays, Ruby is the most popular language, especially for SaaS application development. It has a perfect and elegant syntax structure, and it is the language behind the ultimate robust framework known as Ruby on Rails.

    In this tutorial, we will explain the three different processes to install Ruby on Ubuntu 20.04 machine.

  • How To Install Docker And Pull Images From Docker Hub

    Learn how to install Docker and pull images from Docker Hub

  • Run Ocserv VPN Server & Apache/Nginx on the Same Box with HAProxy

    This tutorial will be showing you how to run OpenConnect VPN server (ocserv) and Apache/Nginx on the same box with HAProxy. OpenConnect (ocserv) is an open-source implementation of the Cisco AnyConnect VPN protocol.

Fedora Community Updates From Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora program update: 2020-43

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 33 will be released on Tuesday!

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora status updates: September 2020

    Welcome to the newly-revitalized monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the regular updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-42 – Fedora Community Blog

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Final freeze is underway. Please update the Release Readiness page with your team’s status. The Go/No-Go meeting is Thursday.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora Community Blog monthly summary: September 2020

    In September, we published 18 posts. The site had 3,176 visits from 2,022 unique viewers. Readers wrote no comments. 13 visits came from Fedora Planet, while 872 came from search engines, and 199 came from the WordPress Android App.

  • GitLab AMA follow-up – Fedora Community Blog

    Last month, we invited folks from GitLab to a public Ask Me Anything (AMA) session. We collected questions from the community in advance about the upcoming Fedora migration to GitLab.

    The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team has been working with GitLab for the past few months on understanding and troubleshooting the technical challenges associated with the migration. This AMA was a natural next step to enable the community to participate and give the Fedora community a chance to get to know some of the GitLab team members who are supporting the migration process.

    During the AMA session, Nuritzi Sanchez, Lindsay Olson, Jason Young, André Luís, Greg Myers, Michelle Gill, Daniel Gruesso, and Nick Thomas from GitLab sat down on IRC with the Fedora and CentOS communities to answer questions live.

  • Crashing saltstack minions on f33?

    It’s a _scope_id bug affecting Salt on Python 3.9. There’s a patch submitted upstream, and 3002+this patch is headed to updates-testing.

  • The Python Maintenance team is hiring

    The Python Maintenance team at Red Hat is looking for a software engineer to join us and help us maintain Python in Fedora and RHEL.

    Hey, Pythonistas. We’re looking for a software engineer to join us in the Python Maintenance team at Red Hat – our remote-friendly Brno-based team with members throughout the Czech Republic (including Prague and Ostrava) as well as abroad (France, partially Greece, US planned).

Review: Peppermint OS 10

Filed under
OS
Reviews

Peppermint is one of those delightful distributions which does what it says it will do. It sets out to be lightweight, easy to set up, and offer native-like access to web applications. It does all of these things and does them well. I also happen to really like the well-organized settings panel and the friendly software manager. I especially like how mintInstall makes it clear when it is working with Deb or Flatpak packages.

While I'm not personally a fan of web applications, I do think Peppermint deserves full credit for making them as easy to use as possible and as native-like as it does. I may never like running my applications over the web, but for people who do like this approach, Peppermint's Ice and SSB features are excellent.

Mostly though I'm a big fan of the distribution's combined LXDE/Xfce desktop. It is a mixture of components which works nicely, is fairly easy to configure, and it offers some of the best performance I have had with an open source desktop this year.

There are some rough edges. The system installer threw out some errors towards the end of the setup process. Needing to logout and back in to see Flatpaks in the application menu was a pain, but not a deal breaker. On the whole I think Peppermint does a good job of feeling modern while offering good performance and easy to use tools.

Read more

Linux 5.10-rc1

Filed under
Linux

Two weeks have passed, and the merge window is over. I've tagged and
pushed out 5.10-rc1, and everything looks fairly normal.

This looks to be a bigger release than I expected, and while the merge
window is smaller than the one for 5.8 was, it's not a *lot* smaller.
And 5.8 was our biggest release ever.

I'm not entirely sure whether this is just a general upward trend (we
did seem to plateau for a while there), or just a fluke, or perhaps
due to 5.9 dragging out an extra week. We will see, I guess.

That said, things seem to have gone fairly smoothly. I don't see any
huge red flags, and the merge window didn't cause any unusual issues
for me. Famous last words..

The most interesting - to me - change here is Christoph's setf_fs()
removal (it got merged through Al Viro, as you can see in my mergelog
below).  It's not a _huge_ change, but it's interesting because the
whole model of set_fs() to specify whether a userspace copy actually
goes to user space or kernel space goes back to pretty much the
original release of Linux, and while the name is entirely historic (it
hasn't used the %fs segment register in a long time), the concept has
remained. Until now.

We still do have "set_fs()" around, and not every architecture has
been converted to the new world order, but x86, powerpc, s390 and
RISC-V have had the address space overrides removed, and all the core
work is done. Other architectures will hopefully get converted away
from that very historic model too, but it might take a while to get
rid of it all.

Anyway, to most people that all shouldn't matter at all, and it's
mainly a small historical footnote that 5.10 no longer relies on the
whole set_fs() model. Most of the actual changes are - as usual -
driver updates, but there are changes all over. I think the merge log
below gives some kind of flavor of what's been going on on a high
level, but if you're interested in the details go look at the git
tree. As mentioned, it's a big merge window, with  almost 14k commits
(*) by closer to 1700 people.

Please go test,

                  Linus

(*) closer to 15k commits if you count merges.

Read more

Also: Linux 5.10-rc1 Released With New Hardware Support, Security Additions

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mike Hoye: Navigational Instruments

    A decade ago I got to sit in on a talk by one of the designers of Microsoft Office who’d worked on the transition to the new Ribbon user interface. There was a lot to learn there, but the most interesting thing was when he explained the core rationale for the redesign: of the top ten new feature requests for Office, every year, six to eight of them were already features built into the product, and had been for at least one previous version. They’d already built all this stuff people kept saying they wanted, and nobody could find it to use it.

    It comes up periodically at my job that we have the same problem; there are so many useful features in Firefox that approximately nobody knows about, even people who’ve been using the browser every day and soaking in the codebase for years. People who work here still find themselves saying “wait, you can do that?” when a colleague shows them some novel feature or way to get around the browser that hasn’t seen a lot of daylight.

    In the hopes of putting this particular peeve to bed, I did a casual survey the other day of people’s favorite examples of underknown or underappreciated features in the product, and I’ve collected a bunch of them here. These aren’t Add-ons, as great as they are; this is what you get from Firefox out of the proverbial box. I’m going to say “Alt” and “Ctrl” a lot here, because I live in PC land, but if you’re on a Mac those are “Option” and “Command” respectively.

    Starting at the top, one of the biggest differences between Firefox and basically everything else out there is right there at the top of the window, the address bar that we call the Quantumbar.

  • FFQueue – SparkyLinux

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: FFQueue

  • How to install the PurpIE Gnome Shell theme on Linux

    PurpIE (AKA Rounded-Rectangle-Purple) is a Gnome Shell theme that turns your Gnome desktop from the basic black/grey/blue colors to a refreshing purple. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install PurpIE and set it up as the default theme.

Programming: Cutelyst, C/C++, Perl and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Cutelyst 2.13 and ASql 0.19 released – Dantti's Blog

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web Framework and ASql the ASync SQL library for Qt applications got new versions.

    Thanks to the work on ASql Cutelyst got some significant performance improvements on async requests, as well as a new class called ASync, which automatically detaches the current request from the processing chain, and attaches later on when it goes out of scope.

    With the ASync class you capture it on your ASql lambda and once the query result arrives and the lambda is freed and the ASync object gets out of scope and continues the processing action chain.

  • LLVM Lands Very Basic Support For AMD Zen 3 CPUs

    While AMD has landed Znver3 support in GNU Binutils, the company hasn't yet sent out patches for either the GCC or LLVM/Clang compilers in setting up the Zen 3 target with its new instructions or optimized scheduling model / cost table. But a basic implementation has been merged to LLVM for allowing "-march=znver3" based on the limited public details thus far.

    Merged to mainline LLVM 12 yesterday was a basic implementation allowing for -march=znver3 targeting that basically flips on the new instructions known to be supported by Zen 3. Beyond Zen 2, it flips on INVPCID, PKU, VAES, and VPCLMULQDQ. There are also a few other instructions supported by Zen 3 as outlined in this earlier article.

  • CY's Take on PWC#083 | Moments on Perl or other Programming Issues [blogs.perl.org]

    I found that I use "and/or" quite frequently in writing. I know, (mathematical-)logically we only need "or". It seems to me to be a language tricky part as the use of gender neutral terms.

  • Warning about Python3 update in latest -current | Alien Pastures

    Warning for people running Slackware-current and have 3rd party packages installed (who doesn’t) that depend on Python3. That includes you who are running KDE Plasma5!

    The “Sun Oct 25 18:05:51 UTC 2020” update in Slackware-current comes with a bump in the Python3 version (to 3.9) which is incompatible with software which already has been compiled against an older version of Python3 (like 3.8).

    I found 26 of my own packages on my laptop that depend on Python3 and they are all probably going to break when upgrading to the latest slackware-current. This includes Plasma5 ‘ktown’ packages but also several of my DAW packages.

System76's Pop!_OS 20.10 and More Preinstalled GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Pop!_OS 20.10

    Today we are looking at Pop!_OS 20.10.  It is based on Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Kernel 5.8, Gnome 3.38, and uses about 1.1GB of ram when idling.  

  • Pop!_OS 20.10 Run Through - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at Pop!_OS 20.10. 

  •  

  • This Linux laptop is a beast - Juno Computers Neptune 15 First Impressions

    I received this beast on tuesday. It's made by a company you might not have heard of, called Juno computers. They operate ouf of London, and much like Slimbook or Tuxedo, they offer laptops based on Clevo designs, as well as desktops. Disclaimer: I haven't received any money for this video, and I don't get to keep the laptop either, so be nice Wink

ScummVM Android Love

Filed under
OS
Android
Gaming

Our new and shiny Android port for ScummVM v2.2.1 is now live on the Google Play Store. After quite a long period of dedicated work from our team developers, and a month of public beta testing by members of our community who helpfully reported quite a few issues for us to address, we are finally ready to give you the stable release for our ScummVM Android app.

This app has been significantly re-written and tested on modern Android devices, running up to Android 10+. It includes new features which bring it up to speed with the desktop ScummVM application, such as FluidSynth support, Cloud Saves and more localization choices for the UI. Also included is the Local File Server (LAN) feature, whereby your device can act as a temporary file server allowing you to download files (eg. save files and even the config file) or upload new ones (eg. game data) using a web browser from a PC or another client.

Read more

Kernel: Linux 5.10 Outline, TTM and Intel Compute Stack

Filed under
Linux

  • Linux 5.10 Brings Many Changes From Better CPU Support To File-System Optimizations - Phoronix

    The Linux 5.10 merge window is set to close this afternoon followed by around seven weeks worth of release candidates before the stable kernel release in December. As usual here is our look at the many new features set to premiere with this next version of the Linux kernel.

    With Linux 5.10 there is a lot of work on file-system optimizations and other storage improvements, various additions for AMD Zen 3 processors, continued open-source driver work for Big Navi / Radeon RX 6000 series, mainline support for the Purism Librem 5 smartphone revisions thus far, the Creative SoundBlaster AE-7 support finally being supported under Linux, XFS has shifted its timestamp support from breaking after Year 2038 to now working up to Year 2486, Nintendo Switch controller support, and other new hardware support and other work.

  •  

  • New TTM Code Can Yield 3~5x Faster Page Allocation For AMDGPU, Other Benefits - Phoronix

    The Linux kernel's TTM memory management code that is most notably used by the Radeon / AMDGPU kernel drivers but also Nouveau, QXL, VMWGFX, and others, is seeing a new back-end allocation pool that can yield 3~5x faster page allocation performance for video memory. 

    Longtime AMD Linux driver developer Christian König has been working on this new TT back-end allocation pool that he posted today. With the patch series it is made the default for TTM and updates all existing TTM-based drivers to using this new allocation code for pages. 
      
     

  • Alder Lake Support Published For The Open-Source Intel Compute Stack

    This past week Intel began adding Alder Lake support to their Linux graphics driver and that also continued on the compute side with the Intel Compute-Runtime receiving initial support for Alder Lake S "ADLS" too.

    The open-source Intel Compute-Runtime that provides OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero support for Intel graphics hardware on Linux merged their initial Alder Lake code this week. But given that Alder Lake is still using Gen12-LP graphics like Tiger Lake and Rocket Lake, the enablement isn't too great but just some basic modifications and tweaks while largely leveraging the existing Gen12 paths, just as we've seen with the kernel DRM driver, etc.

    The Alder Lake support for the open-source Intel Compute-Runtime was merged under "opensource ADLS."

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to host a chat server with OpenFire on Linux

    OpenFire is a cross-platform, real-time chat server that is based on the XMPP protocol. It’s perfect if you’re looking to host your own chat server but don’t want to deal with complicated apps like RocketChat, Mattermost, and others.

  • Getting started with Lutris
  • [Older] How to rebuild a package using the Arch Linux Build System

    The ABS or Arch Build System is a package building system native to the Arch Linux distribution: with it, we can easily build packages which can be installed with pacman, the distribution package manager, starting from source code. All we have to do is to specify instruction inside a PKGBUILD file and then build the package using the makepkg tool. In this tutorial we will see how to customize and re-build an already existing package.

  • Fedora 32 Desktop Install Guide – If Not True Then False

    This is quick guide howto install Fedora 32 Desktop on real pc. First create your bootable USB flash drive using Fedora Media Writer, dd or similar tool.

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: October 25th, 2020

Filed under
News

The fourth installment of the 9to5Linux Weekly Roundup is here, for the week ending October 25th to keep you guys up to date with the most important things that have happened lately in the Linux world.

This week we had a major Ubuntu release, a new desktop computer from System76, and a bunch of new app and distro releases. But first I want to take the time to thank everyone for following us on social media and for their likes, retweets, and comments. You guys rock!

Read more

Seeed offers PCB assembly discounts for RPi CM4 boards and teases CM4 carrier

Filed under
Linux

Seeed is offering $500 off its Seeed Fusion PCB Assembly Service for Raspberry Pi CM4-based commercial products and five free boards for open source developers. Seeed also teased its own upcoming CM4 carrier.

Seeed has announced a sponsorship promotion for its Seeed Fusion PCB assembly service for customers developing boards built around the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4. Commercial developers with CM4-based boards can receive up to $500 off Seeed’s PCM assembly and manufacturing service. Individuals with open source boards based on the CM4 can get five boards produced for free.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leaving Mozilla and Recalling One's Job in Mozilla

  • yoric.steps.next()

    The web is getting darker. It is being weaponized by trolls, bullies and bad actors and, as we’ve witnessed, this can have extremely grave consequences for individuals, groups, sometimes entire countries. So far, most of the counter-measures proposed by either governments or private actors are even scarier. The creators of the Matrix protocol have recently published the most promising plan I have seen. One that I believe stands a chance of making real headway in this fight, while respecting openness, decentralization, open-source and privacy. I have been offered the opportunity to work on this plan. For this reason, after 9 years as an employee at Mozilla, I’ll be moving to Element, where I’ll try and contribute to making the web a better place. My last day at Mozilla will be October 30th.

  • Working open source | daniel.haxx.se

    I work full time on open source and this is how. Background I started learning how to program in my teens, well over thirty years ago and I’ve worked as a software engineer and developer since the early 1990s. My first employment as a developer was in 1993. I’ve since worked for and with lots of companies and I’ve worked on a huge amount of (proprietary) software products and devices over many years. Meaning: I certainly didn’t start my life open source. I had to earn it. When I was 20 years old I did my (then mandatory) military service in Sweden. After having endured that, I applied to the university while at the same time I was offered a job at IBM. I hesitated, but took the job. I figured I could always go to university later – but life took other turns and I never did. I didn’t do a single day of university. I haven’t regretted it. [...]    I’d like to emphasize that I worked as a contract and consultant developer for many years (over 20!), primarily on proprietary software and custom solutions, before I managed to land myself a position where I could primarily write open source as part of my job. [...] My work setup with Mozilla made it possible for me to spend even more time on curl, apart from the (still going) two daily spare time hours. Nobody at Mozilla cared much about (my work with) curl and no one there even asked me about it. I worked on Firefox for a living. For anyone wanting to do open source as part of their work, getting a job at a company that already does a lot of open source is probably the best path forward. Even if that might not be easy either, and it might also mean that you would have to accept working on some open source projects that you might not yourself be completely sold on. In late 2018 I quit Mozilla, in part because I wanted to try to work with curl “for real” (and part other reasons that I’ll leave out here). curl was then already over twenty years old and was used more than ever before.

Programming: Buzzwords, Meson, Tracealyzer, LLVM, Python and Rust

  • What is DevSecOps? Everything You Need To Know About DevSecOps

    Most people are familiar with the term “DevOps,” but they don’t know how to really utilize it. There’s more to DevOps than just development and operational teams. There’s an essential element of DevOps that is often missing from the equation; IT security. Security should be included in the lifecycle of apps.  The reason you need to include security is that security was once assigned to one team that integrated security near the end-stages of development. Taking such a lax approach to security wasn’t such a problem when apps were developed in months or years. The average development cycle has changed quite a bit, though, and apps can be developed in a matter of days or weeks. Outdated security practices like leaving security too late can bring DevOps initiatives to their knees. 

  •   
  • Nibble Stew: The Meson Manual: Good News, Bad News and Good News

    Starting with good news, the Meson Manual has been updated to a third edition. In addition to the usual set of typo fixes, there is an entirely new chapter on converting projects from an existing build system to Meson. Not only are there tips and tricks on each part of the conversion, there is even guidance on how to get it done on projects that are too big to be converted in one go.

  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

    Percepio announced the availability of Tracealyzer version 4.4 with support for embedded Linux. Tracealyzer gives developers insight during software debugging and verification at the system level by enabling visual exploratory analysis from the top down. This makes the software suitable for spotting issues during full system testing and drill down into the details to find the cause. Version 4.4 adds several views optimized for Linux tracing, in addition to a set of visualizations already in Tracealyzer, and leverages Common Trace Format (CTF) and the widely supported LTTng, an open source tracing framework.

  •   
  • LLVM Adds A SPIR-V CPU Runner For Handling GPU Kernels On The CPU - Phoronix

    LLVM has merged an experimental MLIR-based SPIR-V CPU runner that the developers are working towards being able to handle CPU-based execution of GPU kernels.  This new SPIR-V runner is built around the MLIR intermediate representation (Multi-Level Intermediate Representation) with a focus of going from GPU-focused code translated through SPIR-V and to LLVM and then executed on the CPU. The runner focus is similar to that of the MLIR-based runners for NVIDIA CUDA, AMD ROCm, and Vulkan, but just executing on the CPU itself. It was earlier this year LLVM added the MLIR-Vulkan-Runner for handling MLIR on Vulkan hardware. 

  • Python Modulo in Practice: How to Use the % Operator – Real Python

    Python supports a wide range of arithmetic operators that you can use when working with numbers in your code. One of these operators is the modulo operator (%), which returns the remainder of dividing two numbers.

  • Test & Code : Python Testing for Software Engineering 136: Wearable Technology - Sophy Wong

    Wearable technology is not just smart consumer devices like watches and activity trackers. Wearable tech also includes one off projects by designers, makers, and hackers and there are more and more people producing tutorials on how to get started. Wearable tech is also a great way to get both kids and adults excited about coding, electronics, and in general, engineering skills. Sophy Wong is a designer who makes really cool stuff using code, technology, costuming, soldering, and even jewelry techniques to get tech onto the human body.

  • Librsvg's test suite is now in Rust

    Some days ago, Dunja Lalic rewrote the continuous integration scripts to be much faster. A complete pipeline used to take about 90 minutes to run, now it takes about 15 minutes on average. [...] The most complicated thing to port was the reference tests. These are the most important ones; each test loads an SVG document, renders it, and compares the result to a reference PNG image. There are some complications in the tests; they have to create a special configuration for Fontconfig and Pango, so as to have reproducible font rendering. The pango-rs bindings do not cover this part of Pango, so we had to do some things by hand.

ARM32 in Linux and Open Source Hardware Certification

  • ARM32 Page Tables

    As I continue to describe in different postings how the ARM32 start-up sequence works, it becomes necessary to explain in-depth the basic kernel concepts around page tables and how it is implemented on ARM32 platforms. To understand the paging setup, we need to repeat and extend some Linux paging lingo. Some good background is to read Mel Gormans description of the Linux page tables from his book “Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager”. This book was published in 2007 and is based on Mel’s PhD thesis from 2003. Some stuff has happened in the 13 years since then, but the basics still hold. It is necessary to also understand the new layers in the page tables such as the five layers of page tables currently used in the Linux kernel. First a primer: the ARM32 architecture with a classic MMU has 2 levels of page tables and the more recent LPAE (Large Physical Address Extension) MMU has 3 levels of page tables. Only some of the ARMv7 architectures have LPAE, and it is only conditionally enabled, i.e. the machines can also use the classic MMU if they want, they have both. It is not enabled by default on the multi_v7 configuration: your machine has to explicitly turn it on during compilation. The layout is so different that the same binary image can never support both classic and LPAE MMU in the same kernel image.

  • Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API – Open Source Hardware Association

    Today we are excited to announce the launch of a read/write API for our Open Source Hardware Certification program. This API will make it easier to apply for certification directly from where you already document your hardware, as well as empower research, visualizations, and explorations of currently certified hardware. OSHWA’s Open Source Hardware Certification program has long been an easy way for creators and users alike to identify hardware that complies with the community definition of open source hardware. Since its creation in 2016, this free program has certified hardware from over 45 countries on every continent except Antarctica. Whenever you see the certification logo on hardware:

LibreOffice: Presentation Size Decreasing and New Presentations About LibreOffice