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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2017 - 10:50am
Story Linus The Man Behind Linux Mohd Sohail 18/02/2017 - 8:40am
Story Mozilla Thunderbird Email Client Finally Makes Its Way Back into Debian's Repos Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2017 - 1:25am
Story Canonical Outs Snapcraft 2.27 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.10 & Ubuntu 16.04 Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2017 - 1:23am
Story Top 6 best Linux terminal emulators of 2017 Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2017 - 1:11am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:35pm
Story Linux/OSS Devices Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:34pm
Story Linux and Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:33pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:32pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:30pm

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Ubuntu Leftovers and Devices/PCs With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux Lite Among The Best Lightweight Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

Today, we will look at Linux lite 3.2. This is neither a distro aiming to be a lightweight distro nor a distro trying to unleash the power of Linux with all apps preloaded. Instead, It tries to strike that perfect balance between them. Now, almost all of the distros aim to do that then, what is so special about this distro which makes it unique. Well, let me introduce to the distro first and I think why it achieved so much more than other distros becomes clear after that.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • What's Still Left TODO With The Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    With yesterday having marked one year since the release of Vulkan as well as one year since the ANV Vulkan driver code was open-sourced, here's a look at some of what's still left to be tackled by this open-source Vulkan Linux driver for HD/Iris Graphics.

  • Nouveau Changes Prepped For Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Ben Skeggs has queued up the planned open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) driver changes for the imminent Linux 4.11 cycle.

    He now has a linux-4.11 Git branch with the Nouveau DRM driver changes expected for this next kernel cycle.

  • A Lot Of The OpenGL Shader Cache Code Has Landed In Mesa

    Timothy Arceri, who is now working for Valve (on the open-source AMD driver stack after leaving Collabora), has landed significant portions of his work built upon others for providing an on-disk shader cache within Mesa.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready

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KDE
Slack
  • KDE 5_17.02 for Slackware-current is available

    I am happy to announce my February 2017 release of the ‘ktown’ packages: KDE 5_17.02. What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, Plasma 5.9.2 and Applications 16.12.2. All built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    Soon, I will compile this version of Plasma 5 on Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) as well, but I gave priority last few days to the new LibreOffice packages and a new PLASMA5 Live image. The packages that I am releasing today are for Slackware-current only (both 32bit and 64bit). As stated in my previous post, I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • New Slackware PLASMA5 Live ISO (with Plasma 5.9)

    To conclude this week’s batch of updates in my repositories I have re-generated the ISO for PLASMA5 Slackware Live Edition – it is based on liveslak 1.1.6.2 and using Slackware-current dated “Mon Feb 13 06:21:22 UTC 2017“.

    If you already use PLASMA5 Live on a USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • Cutelyst 1.4.0 released, C100K ready.

    Thanks to the last batch of improvements and with the great help of jemalloc, cutelyst-wsgi can do 100k request per second using a single thread/process on my i5 CPU. Without the use of jemalloc the rate was around 85k req/s.

    This together with the EPoll event loop can really scale your web application, initially I thought that the option to replace the default glib (on Unix) event loop of Qt had no gain, but after increasing the connection number it handle them a lot better. With 256 connections the request per second using glib event loop get’s to 65k req/s while the EPoll one stays at 90k req/s a lot closer to the number when only 32 connections is tested.

GNOME 3.24's Mutter and GNOME Shell

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24's Mutter Window Manager to Improve HiDPI and EGLStream Support

    Now that we've told you all about the goodies coming to the GNOME Shell user interface when the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment will be released next month on March 22, it's time to see what improvements landed for the Mutter window manager.

    We believe that Mutter is the second most important component of the open-source GNOME desktop environment, and the upcoming major release got a first Beta milestone the other day, bringing us a bunch of interesting improvements. Among these, there's better EGLStream support, along with HiDPI support for the window menu placement.

  • GNOME Shell to Get Night Light Indicator in Status Area for GNOME 3.24 Desktop

    As part of yesterday's GNOME 3.24 Beta desktop environment release, last minute updates for the GNOME Shell user interface and Mutter window manager landed as well with numerous improvements.

    In this article, we'd like to tell you about the new features and improvements that have been implemented in the first Beta release of GNOME Shell, which is the most important component of GNOME 3.24 because without it users couldn't even interact with the desktop environment.

FOSS in surveillance/data collection

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OSS
  • Why Open Source is Driving the Big Data Market

    The big data market is moving at lightning speed. But when it comes to solutions, there’s a widening chasm between the legacy approach and next-generation developers and vendors.
    While the legacy approach has worked well over the years and still has its place in what is becoming a huge market, there are many signs that open source solutions will be better placed to help business optimise the advantages that big data analysis brings.

    But first who are the legacy vendors? Typically, they have their own large internal teams, dedicated to building proprietary, bespoke software. They have solid products, reliable technology and well-funded research and development projects.

  • IBM partners with open-source solution provider

    At its annual PartnerWorld Leadership Conference, IBM announced a new partnership with open-source solution provider Hortonworks. The provider primarily deals in Hadoop deployments.

    This new relationship will bring the Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) to IBM’s Elastic Storage Server (ESS) and Spectrum Scale storage offerings. Essentially, this will eliminate the need for customers to copy data from enterprise storage to a separate analytics platform. This would then ideally lower the time it takes for those customers to respond to data-based queries.

CruxEX 3.3 (CRUX 3.3)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

KDE Applications 17.04 Schedule

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KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.04 Announced for April 20, Here's the Final Release Schedule

    KDE developer Albert Astals Cid announced that the release date of the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 open-source software suite for KDE Plasma desktop environments, along with the final release schedule.

    We were just wondering when KDE Applications 17.04 will be released when the current KDE Applications 16.02 series received its second maintenance update, and we were right to believe at the point in time that the final release is coming in April, and, according to the release schedule, it looks like KDE Applications 17.04 lands April 20, 2017.

  • KDE Applications 17.04 To Be Released 20 April

    The release schedule for the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 has been firmed up.

    The KDE Applications 17.04 release is scheduled to happen on 20 April. For that to happen, the planned dependency freeze is 16 March, the beta release on 23 March, KDE applications 17.04 Release Candidate on 6 April, and prepping for the actual 17.04 release beginning on 13 April.

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Officially Released with Linux Kernel 4.8 from Ubuntu 16.10

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Ubuntu

After a long wait, Canonical released today the second point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, which is the first to include an HWE stack from a newer Ubuntu version, in this case Ubuntu 16.10.

As expected, Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS is nothing but a collection of all the latest security patches and software updates that have been released by Canonical for the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) series since the July 2016 launch of Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Released; Ubuntu 17.04 In Feature Freeze

Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Has Entered Feature Freeze, Beta Lands February 23

Enlightenment 0.21.6 Desktop Environment Adds New Wayland Improvements, Bugfixes

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It's been two months since its last update and the Enlightenment 0.21 desktop environment and window manager for Linux-based operating systems has received today a new point release, the sixth in the stable series.

Enlightenment 0.21.6 is a bugfix and stability release that attempts to address various of the issues discovered by the development team behind the open-source software or reported by users since the last update. A total of 28 changes were included in the new version, some of them bringing improvements for the Wayland display server.

Read more

Leftovers: GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • New And Best Features Of Linux Kernel 4.10

    Back in December, 2016, Linux boss Linus Torvalds rolled out Linux kernel 4.9. Thanks to tons of code due to Project Ara’s ‘greybus’ and AMD GPU register definition files, it was the biggest ever kernel release in terms of commits. The release also opened the Linux kernel 4.10 merge window. Kernel 4.10 is expected to be released this weekend–most probably on February 19.

  • Renesas joins industrial Linux organisation

    Starting with the RZ/G series of microcontrollers (1.5GHz ARM, 3D graphics, HD video), it plans to develop an embedded platform for industrial applications incorporating the project’s industrial-grade Linux operating system (OS).

  • Open source industrial software gets momentum with Civil Infrastructure Platform
  • Best Linux distros for small businesses in 2017

    Running a small business is no easy task. The last thing you need is extra complexity in your IT infrastructure – so why turn to Linux? Well, it could (if you're lucky) actually turn out to be a less complex choice for many tasks, depending on the distribution you select. And, critically, Linux is free; at least if you don't figure in support costs. That's an overhead ticked off the list.

    So what's the best choice for your small business? We've approached this selection with a few criteria in mind. Stability is first and foremost, because if you're putting a distro to work, uptime is critical, and solid support provision comes a close second.

  • Kernels Becoming Tumbleweed Norm, Grub 2 Gets Release Candidate

    Two Linux Kernels per week in openSUSE Tumbleweed is becoming the norm as the rolling release is providing daily snapshots of new software that are closely aligned with upstream development.

    Kernel 4.9.8 and 4.9.9 were released in the 20170208 and 20170212 snapshots respectively and the later brought a fix for a Btrfs system call.

Networking and Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Your OpenStack Cloud Is Only As Good As The Linux You Install It On

    OpenStack services and drivers require a robust and integrated Linux operating system for top-performing functionality.

    OpenStack is not (just) an operating system; it’s cloud infrastructure.

    Open source developers and technologists from around the world collaborate on OpenStack to create infrastructure and tools for building and managing public and private clouds. According to the overview provided by the OpenStack Foundation, OpenStack is a “cloud operating system” that is designed to control and manage large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources.

    In more practical terms, OpenStack is a framework of at least 10 independent core services that all function together as the foundation for cloud infrastructure. At its very basic level, OpenStack is a set of services provided via a group of Python-written scripts that work in conjunction with another. Like any script, service, or plugin, they require an operating system (OS) to run, function, and perform. In OpenStack’s case, the OS of choice is Linux.

  • The Basics: Explaining Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and Docker Swarm

    Containers, a lightweight way to virtualize applications, are an important element of any DevOps plan. But how are you going to manage all of those containers? Container orchestration programs—Kubernetes, Mesosphere Marathon, and Docker Swarm—make it possible to manage containers without tearing your hair out.

    Before jumping into those, let's review the basics. Containers, according to 451 Research, are the fastest growing cloud-enabling technology. The reason for their appeal is that they use far fewer system resources than do virtual machines (VMs). After all, a VM runs not merely an operating system, but also a virtual copy of all the hardware that the OS needs to run. In contrast, containers demand just enough operating system and system resources for an application instance to run.

  • What's the difference between NFV automation and NFV orchestration?

    NFV automation is the ability to transfer manual network configuration to technology; NFV orchestration creates the deployment and automation blueprint.

  • AT&T, Intel, Google, Microsoft, Visa, and More to Speak at Open Networking Summit 2017

    The Linux Foundation has announced keynote speakers and session highlights for Open Networking Summit, to be held April 3-6, 2017 in Santa Clara, CA.

    ONS promises to be the largest, most comprehensive and most innovative networking and orchestration event of the year. The event brings enterprises, carriers, and cloud service providers together with the networking ecosystem to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open source networking.

  • Developing open source software defined standards

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is announcing its new Open Innovation Pipeline made possible through the aligned operations of ONF and Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) as these two organizations finalize their pending merger.

    ON.Lab, with CORD and ONOS, successfully brought together operators, vendors and integrators to build solutions for carrier networks by leveraging SDN, NFV and Cloud technologies through an open source approach to solution creation. Operators have embraced the approach, and the industry is in the midst of a resulting transformation revolutionizing how solutions will be built for 5G mobile, ultra broadband and other next-generation networks.

Desktop: Munich’s Fake News On GNU/Linux, More Misleading Headlines, and "You've come a long way baby!"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Munich’s Fake News On GNU/Linux

    Truth doesn’t seem to matter much in politics these days. Just repeat a lie. If enough believe it, you get what you want… Despite proof that GNU/Linux works for Munich, the mayor and friends are going to migrate back to Wintel at all costs.

  • Munich's vote to return to Windows annoys Linux and LibreOffice community [Ed: This headline is misleading and needs correcting]

    THE GERMAN CITY of Munich has voted to investigate the viability of creating a Windows 10 client, thus ending its multi-million euro, nine-year experiment in running the municipality on Linux.

    A final decision will be taken later, but the announcement marks the first step on the road back to Microsoft, just three years after completing the transition.

  • Linux desktops: You've come a long way baby!

    Anyone who has used Linux for the last 15 years or so knows that things have gotten better and better when it comes to desktop environments. There are plenty to choose from and, as the years have gone by, Linux desktops have made big advances in terms of features and quality.

    One redditor recently noted how much better Linux desktops are today in a thread on the Linux subreddit.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Alternative Global Menu For MATE And Xfce: Vala Panel AppMenu [PPA]

    A while back I wrote about TopMenu, a panel plugin that provides global menu (AppMenu) support for MATE, then also included support for Xfce and LXDE.

    The problem with TopMenu is that it only partially supports GTK3, it doesn't support LibreOffice, and with Ubuntu 16.04, it doesn't support Qt (4 or 5) applications.

  • Gimp Photo Editor A Free Photoshop Alternative

    So Photoshop is the industry standard for photo editing but it is going to cost you as high as $600 a year. If you are looking for something arguably as good but cheaper as free, then you’ve got to go with GIMP. GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) is a cross-platform image editor available for GNU/Linux, OS X, Windows and more operating systems. So how good is GIMP? Can it effectively replace Photoshop? How far Let’s take a look.

  • ANNOUNCE: libosinfo 1.0.0 release

    I am happy to announce a new release of libosinfo, version 1.0.0 is now available, signed with key DAF3 A6FD B26B 6291 2D0E 8E3F BE86 EBB4 1510 4FDF (4096R). All historical releases are available from the project download page.

  • 3 Good Command-Line Audio and Graphics Apps for Linux

    It is often faster to use command-line apps to play audio files and preview images than to futz around launching and using a graphical application, and you can use them in scripts. Come along to learn about MOC and SoX for playing audio files, and feh for viewing image files from the Linux command line.

  • Franz – One application for 14 messenger services (WhatsApp, Telegram, Google Hangouts & more)

    Franz is a free desktop messaging app which combines chat & messaging services into one application. It currently supports 14 messenger services such as Slack, WhatsApp, WeChat, HipChat, Facebook Messenger, Telegram, Google Hangouts, GroupMe, Skype and many more. You can download Franz for Mac, Windows & Linux. Still its in beta, hope they will add more apps before its going stable release.

  • PTS 7.0 M4 Released With SVG Graph Optimizations, More CLI Interface Tweaks
  • GRUB 2.02 Is Still Coming Along With Many Features, Even Morse Code Output

    The first release candidate to GRUB 2.02 was quietly released at the beginning of the month. GRUB 2.02 is going to be a sizable feature update with it already having been five years since the current stable version, GRUB 2.00.

  • A quick introduction to tmux

    For many people, the Linux terminal represents a substantial portion of where their most important work happens. Whether a system administrator managing multiple remote machines, a programmer trying to run a new snippet of code as they walk through the source, or simply an ordinary user who is trying to read a man page for documentation as they step through pecking out a lengthy command, it's not uncommon to need to run and see the output of multiple terminal applications at a time.

    Why should keeping track of multiple applications be a difficult proposition that requires a fancy modern GUI? Sure, you can launch multiple terminal instances, or use a terminal emulator that tiles terminals for you. But there's an easier, and arguably better way, by using a native terminal application to manage your multiple applications just like you would in a traditional windowed environment. Enter tmux, the terminal multiplexer.

More on HITMAN for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • RadeonSI Works Surprisingly Well With HITMAN On Linux

    With today's release of HITMAN for Linux it's exciting not only because there are signs of possible Vulkan support but also because Feral Interactive backed this game with launch-day RadeonSI support.

  • HITMAN ‘The Complete First Season’ Out Now for Linux

    HITMAN, the latest entry the popular Hitman franchise, is available to buy and play on Linux from today. Surprised? You should be! This HITMAN Linux release is the first game in this popular 16 year-old series to be released on the platform. “Become the Master Assassin in this intense spy-thriller story.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Transit Route Planning Is Coming to GNOME Maps
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Up To 3.24 Beta State

    GNOME Shell 3.23.90 and Mutter 3.23.90 are now available for testing, which represents the component's release for the GNOME 3.24 beta.

    With tonight's GNOME Shell 3.23.90 release is handling Ctrl+Q and Ctrl+W in portal windows, reloading of apps when the .desktop file contents change, fixing for sub-surfaces not showing up in previews, kill-switch has been added for user extensions, and a nightlight indicator has been added to the status area. There have also been a number of bug fixes to the GNOME Shell as it gets ready for the GNOME 3.24.0 release in March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Beta Released

    GNOME 3.23.90, a.k.a. the GNOME 3.24 beta, is now available for testing ahead of this big desktop update due out in late March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Is Coming March 22

    With a one-day delay, the Beta release of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is finally here, available for public testers who want to get an early taste of its new features.

    Of course, GNOME 3.24 Beta can't be called a feature-full release, as some things are yet to be implemented, such as the return routes and transit routing planning functionalities of the Maps app that we've discussed earlier, but it comes with enough changes to please the eye.

  • Outreachy Applications Now Open For Their 2017 Summer Internships

    For those eligible, Outreachy is accepting applications for their summer 2017 internship period if you wish to get paid while getting involved with open-source software.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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