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Friday, 07 May 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • 3 New SUSE Courses including Rancher

    SUSE Technical Product Training is pleased to announce three new technical product training courses, including the first two Rancher courses, have now been released and are available to be scheduled for customers. The first SUSE certification for Rancher products will also soon be available.

  • Setup A Shared Folder Between KVM Host And Guest

    After creating a new Virtual machine, you may want to share files and folders between the KVM host and the KVM virtual machine. In this brief guide, we will see how to setup a shared folder between KVM host and guest virtual machine using Virt-manager in Linux.

    Before configuring a shared folder, make sure you have installed Virt-manager on your KVM host.

    [...]

    If you already have installed complete KVM Virtualization Package group, you don't need to install Virt-manager separately. Virt-manager is part of the KVM virtualization package group. Otherwise, you may need to install it as shown in the above link.

    Create a new Virtual machine from Virt-manager interface. It is very straight-forward and easy! Don't start the VM yet. We need to create shared folder in our KVM host.

  • Static and dynamic IP address configurations: DHCP deployment

    In my Static and dynamic IP address configurations for DHCP article, I discussed the pros and cons of static versus dynamic IP address allocation. Typically, sysadmins will manually configure servers and network devices (routers, switches, firewalls, etc.) with static IP address configurations. These addresses don’t change (unless the administrator changes them), which is important for making services easy to find on the network.

    With dynamic IP configurations, client devices lease an IP configuration from a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server. This server is configured with a pool of available IPs and other settings. Clients contact the server and temporarily borrow an IP address configuration.

  • How to Use the xxd Hex Dumper Utility in Linux

    While most people, even programmers, won't work with bits and bytes on a daily basis, there are ways you can explore files on your Linux system at this level. And xxd is one such utility, a hex dumper.

    Here's how you can use the xxd hex dumper utility to print the content of files in hexadecimal format.

  • How to Check CPU Temperature on a Linux System

    Want to check your CPU temperature to monitor your computer's health and prevent severe component damage? Maybe your Linux system has been overheating and you want to detect which hardware unit is causing the issue.

    This article will explain why CPU temperature monitoring is important and how to check CPU temperature on a Linux machine.

  • How to deploy Samba on Linux as an Active Directory Domain Controller - TechRepublic

    Active Directory (AD) is Microsoft's way of making it possible to create and apply policies to machines associated with a network. It's a tool widely used by businesses and network administrators everywhere.

    Microsoft's solution is not the only means to make this happen; the open source Samba makes it possible to deploy an Active Directory Domain Controller. With this controller, you can then create users, and even set policies.

    I will be writing a series of tutorials on this subject. In this first piece, we'll be deploying the Samba AD on an instance of Ubuntu Server 20.04.

  • 1 click install uTorrent on Ubuntu 21.04 [ with terminal ]

    With over 150 million users uTorrent is the most widely used BitTorrent client outside China; globally only behind Xunlei. The “μ” (Greek letter “mu”) in its name comes from the SI prefix “micro-“, referring to the program’s small memory footprint: the program was designed to use minimal computer resources while offering functionality comparable to larger BitTorrent clients such as Vuze or BitComet.

    uTorrent was controversial for mining cryptocurrency when installed. They had removed the cryptocurrency miner in later versions but it had already done irreversible damage to uTorrent’s reputation.

  • How to Change Color of Specific Folder Icon in Ubuntu 21.04/20.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    Want to make a certain folder different to others in Ubuntu? You can change the icon color and add emblem via Nautilus extension.

    Nautilus, the default file manager in Ubuntu, has an extension called Folder Color. It allows to change the color of selected folder or folders into: Blue, Blown, Green, Gray, Pink, Purple, Red and Yellow.

    You can also add a emblem, e.g., Important, In Process, Favorite, Finished, and New. And reset to default is also available in folders’ context menu.

  • Do Not Miss These 10 Steps in Application Security Assessment

    Contrary to popular belief, application security assessment is an ongoing process and not something you need to do annually. It must also not be done just as a compliance formality.

    While there cannot exist a complete guide to application security that touches all the aspects, here are ten of the things that you need to make sure of in order to keep your applications secure to the maximum possible extent.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • How to hide a backdoor in AI software – such as a bank app depositing checks or a security cam checking faces

    Boffins in China and the US have developed a technique to hide a backdoor in a machine-learning model so it only appears when the model is compressed for deployment on a mobile device.

    Yulong Tian and Fengyuan Xu, from Nanjing University, and Fnu Suya and David Evans, from University of Virginia, describe their approach to ML model manipulation in a paper distributed via ArXiv, titled "Stealthy Backdoors as Compression Artifacts."

    Machine-learning models are typically large files that result from computationally intensive training on vast amounts of data. One of the best known at the moment is OpenAI's natural language model GPT-3, which needs about 350GB of memory to load.

  • Matthew Garrett: More doorbell adventures

    Doorbird sell a chime, a network connected device that is signalled by the doorbell when someone pushes a button. It costs about $150, which seems excessive, but would solve my problem (ie, that if someone pushes the doorbell and I'm not paying attention to my phone, I miss it entirely). But given a shell on the doorbell, how hard could it be to figure out how to mimic the behaviour of one?

    Configuration for the doorbell is all stored under /mnt/flash, and there's a bunch of files prefixed 1000eyes that contain config (1000eyes is the German company that seems to be behind Doorbird). One of these was called 1000eyes.peripherals, which seemed like a good starting point. The initial contents were {"Peripherals":[]}, so it seemed likely that it was intended to be JSON. Unfortunately, since I had no access to any of the peripherals, I had no idea what the format was. I threw the main application into Ghidra and found a function that had debug statements referencing "initPeripherals and read a bunch of JSON keys out of the file, so I could simply look at the keys it referenced and write out a file based on that. I did so, and it didn't work - the app stubbornly refused to believe that there were any defined peripherals. The check that was failing was pcVar4 = strstr(local_50[0],PTR_s_"type":"_0007c980);, which made no sense, since I very definitely had a type key in there. And then I read it more closely. strstr() wasn't being asked to look for "type":, it was being asked to look for "type":". I'd left a space between the : and the opening " in the value, which meant it wasn't matching. The rest of the function seems to call an actual JSON parser, so I have no idea why it doesn't just use that for this part as well, but deleting the space and restarting the service meant it now believed I had a peripheral attached.

    The mobile app that's used for configuring the doorbell now showed a device in the peripherals tab, but it had a weird corrupted name. Tapping it resulted in an error telling me that the device was unavailable, and on the doorbell itself generated a log message showing it was trying to reach a device with the hostname bha-04f0212c5cca and (unsurprisingly) failing. The hostname was being generated from the MAC address field in the peripherals file and was presumably supposed to be resolved using mDNS, but for now I just threw a static entry in /etc/hosts pointing at my Home Assistant device. That was enough to show that when I opened the app the doorbell was trying to call a CGI script called peripherals.cgi on my fake chime. When that failed, it called out to the cloud API to ask it to ask the chime[1] instead. Since the cloud was completely unaware of my fake device, this didn't work either. I hacked together a simple server using Python's HTTPServer and was able to return data (another block of JSON). This got me to the point where the app would now let me get to the chime config, but would then immediately exit. adb logcat showed a traceback in the app caused by a failed assertion due to a missing key in the JSON, so I ran the app through jadx, found the assertion and from there figured out what keys I needed. Once that was done, the app opened the config page just fine.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (python-django), Fedora (java-latest-openjdk, libopenmpt, python-yara, skopeo, thunderbird, and yara), openSUSE (ceph and openexr), Red Hat (postgresql), SUSE (libxml2), and Ubuntu (exim4 and gnome-autoar).

  • Peloton User Accounts Subjected to Data Leaks

    Fitness is supposed to be difficult – it’s how you know it’s working (or at least that’s what we’re told). But it shouldn’t be difficult in this way. A security researcher discovered that the user accounts of Peloton fitness bikes and treadmills were subject to data leaks, and the company took no action initially.

A Number Of Exciting RISC-V Improvements For Linux 5.13

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

From bringing up the PolarFire ICICLE SoC to adding support for KProbes, FORTIFY_SOURCE, and other new kernel features for the RISC-V architecture, the Linux 5.13 kernel changes are exciting for this open-source processor ISA.

Among the RISC-V highlights of new material in Linux 5.13 include:

- Build system improvements including better handling when building the RISC-V Linux kernel with LLVM Clang.

- Support for KProbes, the kernel debugging infrastructure for monitoring events.

Read more

PROFORGE 3 open source 3D printer launches via Kickstarter

Filed under
OSS

Makertech 3D has launched their new third generation 3D printer this week via Kickstarter in the form of the high-performance and open source PROFORGE 3, equipped with a second-generation dual switching hot end.

Early bird pledges are now available for the creative project from roughly $539 or £399 (depending on current exchange rates). If the PROFORGE 3 campaign successfully raises its required pledge goal and the project completion progresses smoothly, worldwide shipping is expected to take place sometime around December 2021. To learn more about the PROFORGE 3 3D printer project checkout the promotional video below.

Read more

Putting An Ultra-Tiny Linux Board In A Phone Charger…Eventually

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Among security professionals, a “drop box” is a device that can be covertly installed at a target location and phone home over the Internet, providing a back door into what might be an otherwise secure network. We’ve seen both commercial and DIY versions of this concept, and as you might expect, one of the main goals is to make the device look as inconspicuous as possible. Which is why [Walker] is hoping to build one into a standard USB wall charger.

This project is still in the early stages, but we like what we see so far. [Walker] aims to make this a 100% free and open source device, starting from the tools he’s using to produce the CAD files all the way up to the firmware the final hardware will run. With none of the currently available single-board computers (SBCs) meeting his list of requirements, the first step is to build a miniature Linux machine that’s got enough processing power to run useful security tools locally. Obviously such a board would be of great interest to the larger hacker and maker community.

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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Optimal flow: Building open organizations where leaders can emerge

    Previously in this series on open organizations and talent management, I’ve discussed the importance of cultivating an organization’s open leaders by getting out of their way and letting them flourish. As someone invested in developing your organization’s next generation of leaders, know that your goal here isn’t to be entirely “hands off”; instead, your goal is to spend time building the systems and processes that help new leaders find their footing and unleash their passion. The truth is that leadership talent rarely develops on its own.

  • Automating the testing process for SystemTap, Part 1: Test automation with libvirt and Buildbot

    Over the past year, I have been implementing an automated infrastructure to test the SystemTap project and to collect and analyze the test results. SystemTap is a scripting language for creating instrumentation to observe a live running Linux kernel and user-space applications. The SystemTap language translator produces Linux kernel modules. These modules depend on internal details of the Linux kernel that vary significantly between different versions of Linux.

    The process of developing the SystemTap project and maintaining it for a wide range of Linux kernel versions requires a strategy to detect and fix unexpected bugs. Bugs can arise not only from changes in the SystemTap project, but also from changes in newer versions of the Linux kernel.

    In order to verify the safety and correct behavior of SystemTap, the SystemTap project includes a test suite based on the DejaGnu framework. However, up to now there was no system for running this test suite each time someone made a commit to the SystemTap Git repository. An infrastructure that automatically runs the test suite and reports new test failures would be very helpful for detecting and fixing bugs as early as possible during the SystemTap development process.

    This article is the first of two articles summarizing the tools that I developed and used to automate the process of testing SystemTap and detecting test failures. For the purpose of these articles, I consider the testing process to consist of seven steps. I describe the implementation for each of these steps and finish by summarizing my key design ideas and outlining potential future improvements.

    The ideas presented in these articles could be useful for other open source projects with complex testing requirements.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Contribute to Fedora Kernel 5.12 Test Week

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.12. This version was recently released and will arrive soon in Fedora. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Sunday, May 06, 2021 through Sunday, May 16, 2021. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • Why Windows and Linux line endings don’t line up (and how to fix it)

    I recently wrote a few automated database-populating scripts. Specifically, I am running Microsoft SQL Server in a container in a Kubernetes cluster—okay, it’s Red Hat OpenShift, but it’s still Kubernetes. It was all fun and games until I started mixing Windows and Linux; I was developing on my Windows machine, but obviously the container is running Linux. That’s when I got the gem of an error shown in Figure 1. Well, not so much an error as errant output.

The Great OS Replacement: How to Find the Best Linux Distribution

Filed under
OS
Linux

Picking the ideal Linux distribution takes research and planning. Not because Linux is a challenge. Rather, the Linux OS offers a seemingly unending selection of distributions to meet general computing as well as special needs for enterprise, SMBs, and personal use.

For enterprise and business-focused users, however, one popular choice has fallen into disfavor with CentOS 8 reaching its end-of-life status as a supported platform. But as is usually the case with the Linux infrastructure, ample replacements are available.

The CentOS community is turning its focus to the Stream fork as a replacement for a directional change by the CentOS sponsors. One major sticking point among CentOS users is that the CentOS community’s rolling releases may not align with most businesses’ infrastructural or organizational needs.

A rolling release is a Linux distribution that is updated from top to bottom on a regular basis, noted Thilo Huellmann, CEO of Levity AI. All, including user-space applications, the kernel, and daemons, is in a constant state of new.

Read more

Graphics: Wayland in GNUstep, Mesa 21.1, and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GNUstep Releases Early Wayland Support, Many Other Improvements Too

    GNUstep as the free software / GNU implementation of the Apple's Cocoa Objective-C frameworks is out with a new version.

    GNUstep's GUI library and GUI back-end are up to version 0.29 while GNUstep Base 1.28 has been released along with an updated GNUstep Makefile Package for re-implementing the APIs associated with Apple macOS.

    Notable with the GNUstep GUI Backend 0.29 is an "alpha version" of native Wayland back-end support. GNUstep software has worked with XWayland while now there is the preliminary Wayland code in place.

  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 21.1.0
    Hello everyone,
    
    Mesa 21.1.0 final is now available!
    There are a lot of new features, but I unfortunately didn't have time to
    make a list; I'm sure your favourite news website will pick up the slack :)
    
    The schedule from now on is to have a point release every other week,
    starting with .1 on the 19th.
    
    Cheers,
      Eric
    
  • Open source Linux GPU drivers Mesa 21.1 released

    Developer Eric Engestrom has announced the availability of Mesa 21.1, the latest release for Linux open source graphics drivers powering Intel, AMD and more.

    In the very short announcement, Engestrom mentioned Mesa will now be back to regular releases with a point release for bug fixes "every other week" which will see Mesa 21.1.1 on May 19. If you want stability, it's usually best to wait for at least that first point release.

  • Turnip Vulkan Driver Continues Maturing, Correctly Rendering More Games - Phoronix

    Turnip is the open-source Mesa Vulkan driver aligned with the Freedreno effort for Qualcomm Adreno support. Turnip has been in fairly good shape but fixes and other improvements keep flowing in as new Vulkan games/apps continue to be tested on this open-source Adreno Vulkan driver.

    Igalia developer Danylo Piliaiev has written a new blog post outlining some of the latest improvements made to this Mesa driver for allowing more Vulkan-powered software to correctly render on this unofficial Qualcomm Linux 3D driver.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Improve The Security Of Linux Servers?

    Many services nowadays run on servers with different Linux distributions. Compared to server versions of Microsoft operating systems, they are free. They are also generally considered to be more secure, but require deeper knowledge on the part of the system administrator to ensure they are configured correctly. It doesn't matter whether the system runs on your own infrastructure or on cloud solutions from Amazon, Microsoft or others. In this article, I'll give you tips for making your Linux instances more secure. The article also includes practical examples of improving the security of Debian-based operating system distributions.

    Automatic installation of updates

    Many servers become targets and victims of hacker attacks due to a security gap in the operating system used. Administrators are usually reluctant to update systems, as this can cause more harm than good, as deployed applications may stop working after a system update. However, it is extremely important for keeping the operating system secure and therefore automatic installations should always be enabled, especially on critical systems. If it is necessary to use older versions of operating systems, we recommend that these computers be completely isolated from the network. A few commands are all that is needed to enable automatic updates on a Linux system.

  • How To Install uTorrent on Debian 10 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install uTorrent on Debian 10. For those of you who didn’t know, uTorrent is the most popular torrent client available for Linux systems. uTorrent downloads file very fast and efficiently as possible without slowing other online activities.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the uTorrent BitTorrent client on a Debian 10 (Buster).

  • How to customize Bash Terminal prompt on Debian 10

    The bash Linux shell provides many customization options for the prompt that you can use not only to incorporate various features in the prompt but also to differentiate them through different colors.

    In this article, we will use various examples to customize and recolor the prompt of our Terminal application that will enable you to do the same depending on your needs. We have the commands and procedures described in this article on a Debian 10 Buster system.

  • Learn essential Kubernetes commands with a new cheat sheet | Opensource.com

    The cloud runs largely on Kubernetes, Kubernetes largely runs on Linux, and Linux runs best when it has a skilled sysadmin at the controls. Whether you consider yourself a cloud architect or just a humble sysadmin, the modern internet needs users who understand how applications and services can be created within containers, scaled on demand, and monitored and managed judiciously.

    One of the first steps into the brave world of containers is learning Kubernetes and its quintessential command: kubectl.

  • Manage the Postfix mail queue with postsuper, postqueue and mailq commands

    Postfix provides several shell programs to manage the mail queue.

  • Resolve DHCPD and HTTPD startup failures with Ansible

    Last year, I had a problem: HTTPD (the Apache web server) would not start on a reboot or cold boot. To fix it, I added an override file, /etc/systemd/system/httpd.service.d/override.conf. It contained the following statements to delay HTTPD's startup until the network is properly started and online. (If you've read my previous articles, you'll know that I use NetworkManager and systemd, not the old SystemV network service and start scripts).

How To Take Screenshot In Linux? — 5 Best Linux Screenshot Tools

Filed under
Software

One of the most common things that we do on our computers is taking screenshots. Be it important info on your screen that you’ll later forget or be it a hilarious meme, the captured screenshot images could prove to be really useful.

We all know how easy it is to take screenshots in Windows, but how easy is it on Linux? In this article, let’s look at how to take a screenshot on Linux. Apart from that, we’ll also be looking at the ten best screenshot tools for Linux if you don’t like the default method. Let’s get started.

Read more

Games: Office Point Rescue Deja Vu, ComPressure, Godot, Nebuchadnezzar, and Green With Energy

Filed under
Gaming
  • Free Game Thursday - check out Office Point Rescue Deja Vu a new retro FPS

    Office Point Rescue Deja Vu is a brand new retro-themed first-person shooter from Magellanic Games, a bigger expanded version of the original from 2020.

    "Terrorists have invaded and taken hostages in the Emeraldalo Corporation's headquaters. Agent Foldon is assigned to infiltrate the building, dispatch the terrorists, rescue any surviving hostages and gather intel."

    Check out our gameplay footage below to get a taste of it. The gameplay was on Easy mode, as I didn't want to spoil any surprises and difficult in the other modes. It gives you a good idea of what to expect though, thoroughly reminding me of some retro arcade shooters that took way too many coins.

  • ComPressure, a complex pipe-building puzzle game is out now

    After a relatively short stint in Early Access, the Zach-like puzzle game ComPressure is officially out now.

    ComPressure has you building complex computation units powered by high pressure steam, which you do by place and moving pipes around to direct this steam where to go. It definitely has a feel like some earlier Zachtronics titles and it's a pretty unique game overall.

  • Go Godot Jam is an upcoming Godot Gamedev Festival between May 6 - June 9

    Learn more about the free and open source Godot Engine during Go Godot Jam, part of the Godot Gamedev Festival running from today May 6 through to June 9.

    Sounds like a fun idea to help show off Godot to even more people. It's packed full of "one month of quality streams and a game jam aimed at celebrating and expanding a vibrant Godot community" and it's entirely open to everyone as this is a free online event.

  • City builder Nebuchadnezzar is getting fire, crime and disease in the next free update

    After launching with Linux support back in February, it seems a lot of people really loved the style but there wasn't enough substance to it. Thankfully the first update addressed some of the issues adding in big freeplay maps, new difficulty modes and a tax/wages mechanic too. Now they've teased the 1.2 update with no current release date which will bring in Fire, Crime and Diseases to add a little more challenge to it.

  • Hook up cities with power to create a sustainable future in the upcoming Green With Energy

    Green With Energy from developer Orbifold Software is an upcoming casual puzzle building game, that sees you become an engineer to design a sustainable power grid.

    Through various contained levels, it acts like a puzzle game that pulls in small elements from a city-builder while you design your grid and place down power structures. It's supposed to be somewhat relaxed while you iteratively design, test and build power grid designs while balancing budget, efficiency, and environmental impact through different levels and biomes.

    [...]

    The developer mentioned Linux will be a first-class platform for it.

LibreOffice 7.1.3 Office Suite Released with More Than 100 Bug Fixes

Filed under
LibO

Coming five weeks after LibreOffice 7.1.2, the LibreOffice 7.1.3 point release is here to address a total of 105 issues across all core components, including Writer, Calc, Draw, and Impress.

According to The Document Foundation, about 25 percent of these fixes are focused on improving the document compatibility with the Microsoft Office file formats, such as DOCX, PPTX, and XLSX.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

UBIFS To Default To Zstd Compressed File-System With Linux 5.13+

Filed under
Linux

Adding to the growing list of changes for Linux 5.13 is the UBIFS file-system now using Zstd for file-system compression by default.

Where available, UBIFS on Linux 5.13 and later will use Zstd as its default compressor where as previously it had been LZO. UBIFS as the file-system for un-managed flash memory devices is now comfortable with the state of Zstd and that it's the superior solution to call it the new default compression method.

Read more

Also: Mike Blumenkrantz: Backish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Stop snoring with Raspberry Pi
  • GridGain Announces Keynote Speakers for First Ignite Summit [Ed: Stop calling a bunch of webchats a "summit"]

    GridGain® Systems, provider of enterprise-grade in-memory computing solutions powered by the Apache® Ignite® distributed database, today announced the keynote speakers for the first Ignite Summit, a virtual event taking place May 25, 2021. Experts from Amazon, 24 Hour Fitness, Intel, Banco do Brasil, GridGain and more will discuss the Apache Ignite technology and how organizations are using it to power modern, high-performance applications. GridGain also announced the addition of a pre-conference training day on May 24, 2021, when attendees can get hands-on, technical training from Apache Ignite experts.

  • Celemony releases ARA SDK under open source license and releases software development kit

    Celemony Software GmbH is placing the ARA Audio Random Access audio interface under open source license as well as releasing a comprehensive software development kit. They say that this will make ARA integration even easier for DAW and plug-in manufacturers. Here's the story in the company's own words...

    [...]

    Right now, the fully revised and expanded ARA Audio Random Access Software Development Kit is available under the Apache 2.0 license, which also makes integration into projects with open-source licenses such as GNU GPLv3 possible.

  • Dark Mode Plugin Repurposed and Renamed to WP Markdown Editor, Change Leaves Users Confused

    Last year, I asked Tavern readers if WordPress should notify end-users when a plugin’s owner changes. The post was not entirely based on theory. There have been some cases of real-world confusion. The consensus from the comments on that post seemed to be that, yes, such notifications would be welcome.

    When I wrote that post, there was already another plugin changing hands. Dark Mode, which had grown in popularity in its earlier years, had a new owner, WPPool. There were no public notifications of this ownership change. A mere GitHub issue filed, a corner of the web that few users venture.

    [...]

    Iceberg is licensed under the GPL version 2, so it is legal for anyone to fork it. However, there does not seem to be any mention of the copyright, and only a few references to the original product remain in the source code.

  • vrurg: Config::BINDish Module First Release

    Soon after Test::Async time has came for the first release of Config::BINDish. At first, I didn’t plan it whatsoever. Then I considered it as a little distraction project to get some rest from an in-house one I was working on lately. But it turned in a kind of a monster which swallowed quite an amount of my time. Now I hope it’s been worth the efforts.

    Basically, the last straw which convinced me to eventually put everything else aside and have this one done was an attempt to develop a model for scalable file hosting. I was stuck, no approach I was considering was good enough. And I decided to change the point of view and try to express the thing in terms of a configuration file. I went on a hunt onto Raku modules site and came back with a couple of already familiar options. Of those I decided that Config::TOML would be the best one for my needs. Unfortunately, very soon I realized that a feature it misses makes my life somewhat harder than I’d like it to be: there was no way to expand a string with an option value.

  • This Week in Rust 389
  • Satellite-navigation systems such as GPS are at risk of jamming

    The original purpose of the GPS and its European (Galileo), Russian (GLONASS) and Chinese (BeiDou) counterparts was to enable suitably programmed receivers on or near the ground to calculate their whereabouts to within a few centimetres, by comparing signals from several satellites. In this role they have become ubiquitous, running everything from the navigation systems of planes, ships and automobiles, both military and civilian, to guiding the application of water and fertiliser in precision agriculture. But global-navigation satellite systems (GNSS), to give their collective name, now do much more than that. By acting as clocks that broadcast the time accurate to within a few dozen nanoseconds, they are crucial to jobs ranging from co-ordinating electricity grids and mobile-phone networks to time-stamping financial transactions and regulating the flow of information in and out of data centres.

  • Wall Street Journal Editorial Tries To Pretend That Fixing Repair Monopolies Is Bad For Your Health

    So we've noted for a long time how efforts to monopolize repair have resulted in a growing, bipartisan interest in right to repair legislation in more than a dozen states. Whether it's Sony and Microsoft's efforts to monopolize game console repair, Apple's tendency to monopolize phone repair (and bully independent repair shops), or John Deere making its tractors a costly nightmare to fix, a sustained backlash has been growing against draconian DRM, rampant abuse of copyright, and other behaviors that make repairing products you own as annoying and expensive as possible.

  • This Motorcycle Airbag Vest Will Stop Working If You Miss a Payment

    In the video, Plummer promotes this as a good option for people who don't ride year-round and therefore may only need a functioning vest a couple of months a year. But when Motherboard asked Klim about what would happen if, say, the customer forgot to turn the subscription back on and got into a crash, a customer service representative confirmed "then, no, it will not go off." Likewise, if the customer's card is declined, they will have a 30-day grace period to update their payment information before the vest stops working, according to Klim communication manager Lukas Eddy.

    “When it comes to missing payments and airbag functionality, In&motion's payment notifications and 30-day grace period are reasonable—at some point, if a person stops paying for a service, that service has to be suspended, just like your utilities or a cell phone plan,” Eddy wrote to Motherboard in an email. “Further, if someone pauses their subscription and forgets to restart it, they won't actually be able to get their In&box into ride-ready status when they go to turn it on. If they then choose to ignore the indicators and ride with the In&box inactive, that's on them and we can expect it not to inflate in the event of a crash.”

Open Letter: DistroWatch

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For the better part of three years, we have remained silent about your ongoing efforts to affect people’s perception of our Linux distribution continuously. We have tried our best not to engage with your evident hostility and disregard to inform your viewers and visitors about correct facts of the Linux distributions you display on your website, especially ours.
However, we have decided to take a stance. It is today, the 6th of May, that we gallantly demand you to stop.
We do not accept for one more minute that the information displayed on your website about our product remains erroneous in what is no longer a “mistake” or “oversight” on your part. In addition, we do not accept the way you have chosen to describe our product, including making an absolute wild claim that we did not offer our product to the public before an arbitrary date, even if that is easily refuted.

Read more

Compact Text Editors Great for Remote Editing and Much More

Filed under
Software
OSS

A text editor is software used for editing plain text files. This type of software has many different uses such as modifying configuration files, writing programming language source code, jotting down thoughts, or even making a grocery list. Given that editors can be used for such a diverse range of activities, it is worth spending the time finding an editor that best suites your preferences.

Whatever the level of sophistication of the editor, they typically have a common set of functionality, such as searching/replacing text, formatting text, importing files, as well as moving text within the file.

All of these text editors are console based applications which make them ideal for work on remote machines. Textadept also provides a graphical user interface, but remains fast and minimalist.

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Audiocasts/Shows: BSDNow, Coder Radio, and TLLTS

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GNU
Linux
BSD
  • BSDNow 401: OpenBSD Dog Garage

    Dog's Garage Runs OpenBSD, EuroBSDcon 2021 Call for Papers, FreeBSD’s iostat, The state of toolchains in NetBSD, Bandwidth limiting on OpenBSD 6.8, FreeBSD's ports migration to git and its impact on HardenedBSD, TrueNAS 12.0-U3 has been released, and more.

  • Context in Comprehension | Coder Radio 412

    From adventures in learning, a recipe for great collaborations, to creativity and problem-solving in tech. It's a deep dive chat with Wes Payne.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 905

    fedora 34, register.com sucks, realestate

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Programming Leftovers

  • Report from the virtual ISO C++ meetings in 2020 (core language)

    C++ standardization was dramatically different in 2020 from earlier years. The business of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) committee all took place virtually, much like everything else during this pandemic. This article summarizes the C++ standardization proposals before the Core and Evolution Working Groups last year.

  • Use multiple compilers to build better projects - Red Hat Developer

    For a multitude of reasons, developers usually compile the project they are working on with only one compiler. On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the system compiler for C and C++ is GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 8, and newer versions are available through the GCC toolset. However, there are several reasons why you might also build your project with Clang. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 offers the LLVM toolset, which contains Clang. In this article, we’ll take a look at why one might use more than one compiler. We’ll focus on a system where GCC is currently the default compiler and consider Clang as the main alternative.

  • Patrick Cloke: A new maintainer for django-allauth-2fa

    I’m excited to announce the django-allauth-2fa project has a new maintainer! It can now be found under the valohai organization on GitHub, who have already contributed quite a bit to the package.

  • The quest for faster Python: Pyston returns to open source, Facebook releases Cinder, or should devs just use PyPy?

    Facebook has released Cinder, used internally in Instagram to improve Python performance, while another faster Python, called Pyston, has released version 2.2 and made the project open source (again). Python is the world's second most popular programming language (after JavaScript) according to some surveys; but it is by no means the fastest. A glance at benchmarks tells us that Python 3 computation is often many times slower than compiled languages like C and Go, or JIT (Just-in-Time) compiled languages like Java and JavaScript. One reason is that the official implementation of Python, called CPython, is an interpreted, dynamic language, and its creator Guido Van Rossum has resisted optimising it for performance, saying in 2014 that "Python is about having the simplest, dumbest compiler imaginable, and the official runtime semantics actively discourage cleverness in the compiler like parallelizing loops or turning recursion into loops."

Security Patches and Reproducible Builds

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (mediawiki and unbound1.9), Fedora (djvulibre and samba), Mageia (ceph, messagelib, and pagure), openSUSE (alpine and exim), Oracle (kernel and postgresql), Scientific Linux (postgresql), and Ubuntu (thunderbird and unbound).

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 174 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 174. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Check that we are parsing an actual Debian .buildinfo file, not just
      a file with that extension.
      (Closes: #987994, reproducible-builds/diffoscope#254)
    * Support signed .buildinfo files again -- file(1) reports them as
      "PGP signed message".
    
    [ Mattia Rizzolo ]
    * Make the testsuite pass with file(1) version 5.40.
    * Embed some short test fixtures in the test code itself.
    * Fix recognition of compressed .xz files with file(1) 5.40.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Ansible emphasizes inclusive language in new release

    During this development cycle, the Ansible project has made significant progress in its goals to make the community and code more welcoming and inclusive. With the release of Ansible Core 2.11, harmful terminology in the Ansible codebase is deprecated and it comes with new replacement terms. These changes will follow our standard deprecation cycle to give users time to adapt.

  • Cost efficient disaster recovery in hybrid cloud environments

    As more and more organizations move from on-premise datacenters to private, public, and hybrid clouds, it is important to understand that high availability is not the same as disaster recovery (DR). DR planning is needed to recover systems when natural or human-induced disasters hit the primary datacenter/region. Recent public cloud outages suggest that we must have a DR plan in place, even with the high availability provided by the public cloud providers. DR planning should be part of the initial application design discussions, allowing the deployment architecture to accommodate for unforeseen events.

  • This is the future...

    This new Linux is the future... Rocky Linux

  • Cockpit Project: Testing all the pixels

    The Cockpit integration tests can now contain “pixel tests”. Such a test will take a screenshot with the browser and compare it with a reference. The idea is that we can catch visual regressions much easier this way than if we would hunt for them in a purely manual fashion. Preparing a repository for pixel tests A pixel test will take a screenshot of part of the Cockpit UI and compare it with a reference. Thus, these reference images are important and play the biggest role. A large part of dealing with pixel tests will consequently consist of maintaining the reference images. At the same time, we don’t want to clog up our main source repository with them. While the number and size of the reference images at any one point in time should not pose a problem, we will over time accumulate a history of them that we are afraid would dominate the source repository. Thus, the reference images are not stored in the source repository. Instead, we store them in an external repository that is linked into the source repository as a submodule. That external repository doesn’t keep any history and can be aggressively pruned. Developers are mostly isolated from this via the new test/common/pixel-tests tool. But if you are familiar with git submodules, there should be no suprises for you here.

  • Fedora Magazine: Contribute to Fedora Kernel 5.12 Test Week

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.12. This version was recently released and will arrive soon in Fedora. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Sunday, May 09, 2021 through Sunday, May 16, 2021. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.