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Wednesday, 22 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Hardware for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Hardware
  • Linux-friendly medical PC supports Nvidia graphics

    IEI’s Linux-ready “HTB-200-C236” medical vision computer has a 6th Gen Xeon or 7th Gen Core CPU, PCIe x16 and x4 slots for Nvidia or Mustang cards, and AetherAI pathology modules for bone marrow smear, cancer screening, and object detection.

    IEI has launched an edge AI computer aimed at the medical industry in collaboration with AetherAI, which is furnishing three preloaded AetherAI pathology modules. The HTB-200-C236 runs Linux or Win 10 on a 6th Gen Skylake Intel Xeon E3-1268LV with 4x 2.4GHz/3.4GHz cores and an Intel C326 chipset. An optional 7th Gen Kaby Lake, quad-core Core i5-7500T has the same 35W TDP.

  • Lindenis V536 SoM & SBC Targets 4K Camera Applications

    Back in summer 2018, we wrote about Lindenis V5 single board computer based on Allwinner V5 quad-core Cortex-A7 processor with two MIPI CSI connectors and designed for 4K cameras.

  • problem-oriented

    Don’t get me wrong; the MAAS doc is pretty solid. I just want to do more with it. As in not just update it for new versions, but make it come alive and show off what MAAS can do. I also want to pick up some of the mid-range applications and situations. MAAS is well-envisioned in large datacentres, and there are obviously hobbyists and small shops tinkering, but that’s not the bulk of people who could genuinely benefit from it. I want to dig into some of the middle-industry, small-to-medium-size possibilities.

    Since I already know something about small hospital datacentres, having worked with them for about ten years, that might be a good place to start. Hospitals from 50-200 beds tend to have the same requirements as a full-size facility, but the challenges of a somewhat smaller budget and lower IT headcount. It really feels like a good sample problem for MAAS.

Security: Patches, KeePass2 and Healthcare

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (openconnect), Fedora (e2fsprogs, glibc, kernel, and nss), openSUSE (Mesa, php7, and slurm), Oracle (.NET Core, java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and thunderbird), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk, openvswitch, and openvswitch2.11), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk), SUSE (java-11-openjdk, libssh, libvpx, Mesa, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (libbsd and samba).

  • KeePass2 2.44 Released with True Key 4 CSV Import

    KeePass 2.44 was released a days ago as the latest stable mono password manager. Users of any previous 2.x version are recommended to upgrade.

    KeePass Password Safe was a Windows only password manager. Through the use of Mono, KeePass 2.x works on Linux and Mac OS.

  • Convenience over security: Mobile healthcare apps open up fresh risks to patients’ data

    Healthcare is increasingly going mobile, as hospitals and medical practitioners look to reduce waiting room times by harnessing the benefits of treatment on the go. But patients are often placing too much trust in these apps, which can often expose them to fresh security and privacy risks.

    The rapid growth of mobile healthcare app market was borne more out of necessity than any medical advancement, in the view of Adam Piper, a software developer working in the UK.

    “If I want to get a doctor’s appointment, it has to be today, and by 8.01am all the appointments are gone,” Piper told The Daily Swig.

What Must be Considered Before Choosing a Container Platform?

Filed under
Server
OSS

An increasing number of IT groups are incorporating development tools, such as containers, in order to create cloud-native apps that operate in a constant manner across public, private, and hybrid clouds.

However, the trickiest part is to find the best container platforms for the organization. It is hard to make the correct decisions regarding container orchestration for managing lifecycles of the containers in order to function at scale and accelerate innovation.

Containers can be Linux

It is vital for every application to run on Linux since the containers are always running on a Linux host.

Containers that are used for managing their lifecycles, work best with Linux. However, these days, Kubernetes is the popular container orchestration platform that was built on Linux concepts and make use of Linux tooling and application programming interfaces (APIs) for managing the containers.

The companies are advised to opt for a Linux distribution that they know and trust before taking any decision on the OS for their container platform. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), an OS platform, suits well for operating company’s containers as it provides stability and security features simultaneously, allowing developers to be agile.

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KDE: Krita Weekly, LabPlot and More

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita Weekly #9

    With everyone getting back into work, we have managed to control the number of bugs. There are 2 fewer bugs than what I reported last time. I know it is still not a lot, but with Dmitry not available for most of the time and team having to divide its time between the resource rewrite & bug fixing, it is pretty good that the number is decreasing.

  • Reference lines and image elements

    We continue working on the plotting capabilities of LabPlot. In the next release we will be adding two new worksheet objects to provide more flexibility and features to create attractive looking visualizations. In this short blog post we want to report on this recent development.

  • Skipping functions from entire directories while debugging (e.g. skip all functions from system headers)

    So, today I got finally so tired of navigating (or explicitly stepping over) all the internal functions in gdb (you know, all the inline functions from STL containers, from Boost, from this pointer wrapper class, that string class) that I finally googled 'gdb skip system functions'. And guess what, it's been there since gdb 7.12, from 3 years ago, and it's almost trivial, just adding something like this to ~/.gdbinit:

Wine 5.0 Released

Filed under
Software
Gaming

  • Wine 5.0 Released

    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 5.0 is now available.

    This release represents a year of development effort and over 7,400 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements that are listed in the release notes below. The main highlights are:

    - Builtin modules in PE format.
    - Multi-monitor support.
    - XAudio2 reimplementation.
    - Vulkan 1.1 support.

    This release is dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, who passed away in August 2019 at the young age of 30. Józef was a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation, and the lead developer of the vkd3d project. His skills and his kindness are sorely missed by all of us.

  • Wine release 5.0
    What's new in Wine 5.0
    ======================
    
    
    *** PE modules
    
    - Most modules are built in PE format (Portable Executable, the
      Windows binary format) instead of ELF when the MinGW compiler is
      available. This helps various copy protection schemes that check
      that the on-disk and in-memory contents of system modules are
      identical.
    
    - The actual PE binaries are copied into the Wine prefix instead of
      the fake DLL files. This makes the prefix look more like a real
      Windows installation, at the cost of some extra disk space.
    
    - Modules that have been converted to PE can use standard wide-char C
      functions, as well as wide-char character constants like L"abc".
      This makes the code easier to read.
    
    - Not all modules have been converted to PE yet; this is an ongoing
      process that will continue during the Wine 5.x development series.
    
    - The Wine C runtime is updated to support linking to MinGW-compiled
      binaries; it is used by default instead of the MinGW runtime when
      building DLLs.
    
    
    *** Graphics
    
    - Multiple display adapters and monitors are properly supported,
      including dynamic configuration changes.
    
    - The Vulkan driver supports up to version 1.1.126 of the Vulkan spec.
    
    - The WindowsCodecs library is able to convert more bitmap formats,
      including palette-indexed formats.
    
    
    *** Direct3D
    
    - Fullscreen Direct3D applications inhibit the screensaver.
    
    - DXGI swapchain presents inform the application when the
      corresponding window is minimized. This typically allows
      applications to reduce CPU usage while minimized, and is in some
      cases required to allow the application window to be restored again.
    
    - Switching between fullscreen and windowed modes using the standard
      Alt+Enter combination is implemented for DXGI applications.
    
    - The following features are implemented for Direct3D 12 applications:
      - Switching between fullscreen and windowed.
      - Changing display modes.
      - Scaled presents.
      - Swap intervals.
      These features were previously already implemented for earlier
      versions of the Direct3D API.
    
    - The handling of various edge cases is improved. Among others:
      - Out of range reference values for the alpha and stencil tests.
      - Sampling 2D resources with 3D samplers and vice versa.
      - Drawing with mapped textures and buffers.
      - Usage of invalid DirectDraw clipper objects.
      - Creating Direct3D devices on invalid Windows, like the desktop
        window.
      - Viewports with a minimum Z larger than or equal to the maximum Z.
      - Resources bound through both shader-resource views and
        render-target or depth-stencil views at the same time.
      - Blits between formats with and without alpha components.
      Since well-behaved applications don't rely on these edge cases, they
      typically only affect one or two applications each. There are
      nevertheless quite a number of them.
    
    - Dirty texture regions are tracked more accurately for Direct3D 8 and 9
      texture uploads.
    
    - Uploads of S3TC-compressed 3D textures require less address space.
      Since 3D textures can be potentially large, and address space
      exhaustion is a concern for 32-bit applications, S3TC-compressed 3D
      textures are uploaded per-slice, instead of in a single upload.
    
    - The ID3D11Multithread interface is implemented.
    
    - Various lighting calculation fixes and improvements for older
      DirectDraw applications have been made.
    
    - Limited support for blits across swapchains is implemented.
    
    - More shader reflection APIs are implemented.
    
    - The wined3d CPU blitter can handle compressed source resources.
      Support for compressed destination resources was already implemented
      in a previous release.
    
  • Wine 5.0 Released With Big Improvements For Gaming, Countless Application Fixes

    Wine 5.0 has been released as stable as the annual timed release of this software for running Windows games and applications on Linux, macOS, and other platforms.

    Wine 5.0 is another big step forward in allowing modern Windows applications to run well particularly on Linux and macOS. Thanks to CodeWeavers and funding by Valve for their work on the Wine-based Proton downstream, there are many game fixes that have been incorporated over the past year especially. So Windows games are in better shape plus there is Vulkan 1.1 support, FAudio integration, and countless other improvements.

  • The bottle for Wine 5.0 has officially been popped open as it's out now

    The day has arrived, the official stable release of Wine 5.0 has arrived bringing thousands of improvements and a bunch of new features.

    [...]

    Wine 5.0 as a release is also being dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation and he lead developer of the vkd3d project who sadly passed away in August 2019.

Programming: Git, Python and PHP

Filed under
Development
  • Git Update Improves DevOps with Partial Cloning Feature

    On Jan. 13, Git 2.25 was released, bringing to one of the most commonly used developer tools new capabilities that will help improve performance and overall developer productivity.

  • Solving Python Error- KeyError: 'key_name'

    As per Python 3 official documentation a key error is raised when a mapping (dictionary) key is not found in the set of existing keys.

  • Python's Execution Time Is Close To C++ And Go Language: Study

    Python is the most preferred programming language for Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence, but it is also the least preferred for being slow to solve certain problems that involve loops.

    To challenge this fact, researchers at EPFL Computer Vision Laboratory published a report in which they presented the competitiveness of Python against C++ and Go by solving the popular N-queens puzzle.

  • PHP in 2020

    It's no secret among web developers and programmers in general: PHP doesn't have the best reputation. Despite still being one of the most used languages to build web applications; over the years PHP has managed to get itself a reputation of messy codebases, inexperienced developers, insecure code, an inconsistent core library, and what not.

    While many of the arguments against PHP still stand today, there's also a bright side: you can write clean and maintainable, fast and reliable applications in PHP.

    In this post, I want to look at this bright side of PHP development. I want to show you that, despite its many shortcomings, PHP is a worthwhile language to learn. I want you to know that the PHP 5 era is coming to an end. That, if you want to, you can write modern and clean PHP code, and leave behind much of the mess it was 10 years ago.

ProtonVPN Applications are Now 100% Open Source

Filed under
OSS
Security

But can you trust your VPN service provider? On more than one occasion, the VPN providers have been caught logging, snooping or sharing data with third party. What to do in such cases?

I have shared a list of privacy focused VPNs for Linux in the past and ProtonVPN is one of them. The good news is that ProtonVPN has just open sourced all its apps and underwent an independent security audit.

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Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Software Freedom Podcast, Jim Salter, Test and Code, PCLinuxOS 2020.01 Screencast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Software Freedom Podcast #4 about REUSE with Carmen Bianca Bakker

    In the monthly Software Freedom Podcast we talk with people who have inspiring ideas about software freedom. In this episode, we talk with Carmen Bianca Bakker about the REUSE project. By this we are covering the very broad topic of software licensing and the problems there, which REUSE is able to solve with three simple steps.
    OPUS FeedMP3 Feed

  • Brunch with Brent: Jim Salter | Jupiter Extras 48

    Brent sits down with Jim Salter, co-host of Jupiter Broadcasting’s TechSNAP and technology reporter at Ars Technica. We explore his relationship with computers via the US Navy, when code has it’s place in either proprietary or open source licensing, the value in being a social gadfly, and Jim’s motivations behind his writing and who he is hoping to reach and inspire.

  • Test and Code: 98: pytest-testmon - selects tests affected by changed files and methods

    pytest-testmon is a pytest plugin which selects and executes only tests you need to run. It does this by collecting dependencies between tests and all executed code (internally using Coverage.py) and comparing the dependencies against changes. testmon updates its database on each test execution, so it works independently of version control.

    In this episode, I talk with testmon creator Tibor Arpas about testmon, about it's use and how it works.

  • PCLinuxOS 2020.01 overview | So cool ice cubes are jealous.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of PCLinuxOS 2020.01 and some of the applications pre-installed.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • RHEL gold images in Azure and user experience improvements for Red Hat Cloud Access

    Red Hat’s Cloud Access program is one of the ways that Red Hat helps its customers use their Red Hat subscriptions in the public cloud. In the last few weeks we’ve introduced significant enhancements and new features we don’t want you to miss, including self-service access to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) gold images directly in Microsoft Azure, and a number of customer experience improvements.

  • First steps with the data virtualization Operator for Red Hat OpenShift

    The Red Hat Integration Q4 release adds many new features and capabilities with an increasing focus around cloud-native data integration. The features I’m most excited about are the introduction of the schema registry, the advancement of change data capture capabilities based on Debezium to technical preview, and data virtualization (technical preview) capabilities.

    Data integration is a topic that has not received much attention from the cloud-native community so far, and we will cover it in more detail in future posts. Here, we jump straight into demonstrating the latest release of data virtualization (DV) capabilities on Red Hat OpenShift 4. This is a step-by-step visual tutorial describing how to create a simple virtual database using Red Hat Integration’s data virtualization Operator.

  • Never enough: Working openly with anxiety

    I've spent most of my career in an organization built on openness and transparency, and yet I have rarely spoken about my mental health and how it might impact my work. In sharing these stories now, I hope to help reduce the stigma of mental health at work and connect with others who may be experiencing similar or related situations. Given the prevalence of mental illness globally, chances are good that if you don't experience a mental health condition first hand, then you're likely working on a daily basis with someone who does.

  • Fedora's Scientific & Audio/Music Spins Could Be On Their Last Leg

    Fedora 32 could be two spins lighter with two little known variants of Fedora Linux set to be removed unless maintainers step up. 

    Fedora Jam, a spin of Fedora catered to audio/music enthusiasts, is set to be eliminated with Fedora 32 if their existing or new maintainers don't step up to work on it. Likewise, Fedora Scientific, a spin catered to shipping scientific software out-of-the-box, is also on the chopping block unless there is maintenance happening. 

Nextcloud Hub takes on Google Docs and Office 365

Filed under
OSS

For years, Nextcloud has set the standard for run-your-own Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) private clouds. Now with the open-source Nextcloud Hub, it's taking on Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) office programs such as Google Docs and Office 365.

Nextcloud has long offered Collabora Online Office, a SaaS version of the open-source LibreOffice office suite to its customers. Hub, though, is a new product. It combines Nextcloud's outstanding cloud file system, Nextcloud Files, with Ascensio System's ONLYOFFICE. Together they are a complete productivity office suite with word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software document management, project management, customer relationship management (CRM), calendar, and mail.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE Plasma 5.18 Includes a System Report Tool — But It’s Strictly Opt-In

Filed under
KDE

So, to help fill in the knowledge gap, KDE is including a new feedback tool in the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.18 release, due in February.

Now, before anyone gets antsy about it, let me stress that this new data collection feature is strictly opt-in (just like Ubuntu’s system reporting). It’s also up to distribution maintainers to decide whether to package the relevant module as part of the Plasma desktop.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 Beta now available

Filed under
Red Hat

Today, we’re pleased to announce that the latest beta version of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.2, is now available. Maintaining our commitment to a predictable, six-month release cadence for minor platform releases, RHEL 8.2 Beta is designed to make it easier for IT organizations to adopt new, production-ready innovations faster. This same cadence and engineering process is also intended to help our hardware partners more quickly deliver supported hardware configurations, furthering customer choice for their datacenter estates.

Beyond the continued benefits of the regular release cadence, RHEL 8.2 drives enhancements to the user experience for both new and existing customers, extends monitoring and performance capabilities and adds new supported developer languages and tools.

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AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT Linux Gaming Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

As announced back at CES, the Radeon RX 5600 XT is being launched as the newest Navi graphics card to fill the void between the original RX 5700 series and the budget RX 5500 XT. The Radeon RX 5600 XT graphics cards are beginning to ship today at $279+ USD price point and offers great Linux support but with one last minute -- and hopefully very temporary -- caveat.

The Radeon RX 5600 XT features 36 compute units, 2304 stream processors, up to 7.19 TFLOPs, a 1375MHz game clock, 6GB of GDDR6 video memory, and a total board power of around 150 Watts. The Radeon RX 5600 XT like the rest of the RDNA/Navi line-up is a 7nm part, supports PCI Express 4.0, and other common RDNA features.

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Can the Linux Foundation Speak for Free Software?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The kindest interpretation of this situation is that the Linux Foundation has a public relations problem that it is unaware of and is overdue to correct. A more cynical interpretation is that, from its very start, the Linux Foundation has been a slow coup, gradually usurping an authority to which it has no right. Ask me on alternate days which one I believe.

Whatever the case, the solutions are the same. A concerted effort to get community members elected to at-large positions might help, although they would still be a minority. Many, too, might not want to legitimize the foundation by participating in it. A more promising response might be to see that community organizations are strengthened to provide a counter-balance, but that would be a slow solution if it worked at all.

I don’t pretend to have an answer. But I believe that free software owes its success to the fact that it is diverse. Centralizing the authority in the community means an end to free software as we know it — and that is something to be avoided at all cost. The very real good that the Linux Foundation does cannot disguise the harm that its orientation may cause.

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GNOME Work Is Underway For Sharper Background Images

Filed under
GNOME

Canonical's Daniel Van Vugt continues working on a variety of interesting performance optimizations for upstream GNOME as well as other usability enhancements for this desktop environment. One of the latest items being tackled is improving the quality of background images on GNOME.

Long story short, for where the background/wallpaper image is larger than the desktop resolution, OpenGL is used for downscaling the image. But the existing means of downscaling could lead to blurry images or just not as sharp as possible images. But now with patches pending, the mipmap level is being limited to still downscale with OpenGL but to have the maximum sharpness possible for the display.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GameMode 1.5

  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release. GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works? To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care. Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects. In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries. In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments. One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.