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Friday, 16 Apr 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Intel and NVIDIA Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2021 - 8:41pm
Story Annual Report 2020: TDF and the Pandemic Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2021 - 8:24pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2021 - 8:22pm
Story Noise With Blanket Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2021 - 8:17pm
Story Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Journal Expats, Linux Experiment, and Krita Artwork Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2021 - 8:10pm
Story Kernel Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2021 - 8:08pm
Story Zorin OS 16 Enters Beta with Stunning New Look, Faster and Smoother Performance Marius Nestor 5 16/04/2021 - 7:52pm
Story FSF Defends RMS Roy Schestowitz 18 16/04/2021 - 6:10pm
Story Devuan 4.0 Alpha Builds Begin For Debian 11 Without Systemd Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2021 - 6:02pm
Story Ubuntu: Shirt, Community and Amazon Listening Roy Schestowitz 1 16/04/2021 - 5:59pm

Graphics: Intel and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Compute Runtime 21.15.19533 Released With Initial Level Zero 1.1 Support - Phoronix

    Intel's engineers working on their open-source Linux-based Compute Runtime stack just released their latest version.

    Intel Compute Runtime 21.15.19533 is the new release for this open-source compute stack for their graphics hardware to expose OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero functionality.

    The main change with v21.15.19533 is exposing Level Zero 1.1 support. Last month was the release of oneAPI Level Zero 1.2.3 with Level Zero 1.1 specification support as an incremental step forward for this low-level Intel interface for interacting with the bare metal hardware. The initial Level Zero 1.1 headers and loader came back in January.

  • Mesa 21.2 Begins Seeing Intel Xe-HP Graphics Driver Changes - Phoronix

    With Mesa 21.1 now branched for this collection of primarily OpenGL/Vulkan open-source drivers for Linux, feature development is on for Mesa 21.2 that will debut in Q3. One of the first major changes to land for Mesa 21.2 is the beginning of the graphics compiler support for Intel's forthcoming Xe-HP high performance graphics processor.

  • NVIDIA CUDA 11.3 Released - Previews Better Python Support - Phoronix

    For GTC21 week NVIDIA has released version 11.3 of their CUDA toolkit.

    CUDA 11.3 is bringing CUDA Graph enhancements, new stream priorities, Steam-ordered memory allocator enhancements, new APIs, support for virtual aliasing across kernel boundaries, and also support now for the Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS point release. CUDA 11.3 also ships improvements to the NVIDIA C++ Standard Library (libcu++), various compiler improvements, and more.

Annual Report 2020: TDF and the Pandemic

Filed under
LibO

2020 was a year to remember, because of LibreOffice’s 10th anniversary and the COVID-19 pandemic, which impacted our lives, hindered travel and canceled community meetings

[...]

We were planning LibreOffice events in Asia and Latin America, as in 2019, and a LibreOffice Conference in Germany, in the lovely medieval city of Nuremberg. We were also planning to attend conferences in Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, to celebrate LibreOffice’s 10th anniversary.

We were planning local meetings of native language communities, to engage new volunteers, and talks at local events, to advocate the use of LibreOffice and the Open Document Format. We were planning meetups with other community members, for a chat over food and drinks, as we have been used to doing on a regular basis over the last 10 – or even 20 – years (in the OpenOffice.org project).

Unfortunately, since March 2020 we have been forced to spend most of our time at home, to protect each other from COVID-19. Although our community has not been hit severely, we have suffered from the pandemic like anyone else, to the point that we will not remember 2020 as the year of the 10th LibreOffice anniversary, but as the year of the big lockdown.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Virtual Box on Fedora 34 via rpmfusion repository
  • 35 Bash Script Examples

    Bash script programming is a sequence of executable commands, carrying out numerous commands at once, task performance automation, and administrative tasks customization. Generally, all Linux users must acquaint themselves with the basic knowledge of bash script programming because of the importance it offers.

  • Deepin 20 Repository Setup

    This tutorial explains how you can enable your Deepin GNU/Linux version 20 upwards on your computer (codenamed Apricot) to install more software. This done by setting up the repository (central of software on the internet) so the user has the correct configuration. The result is you can later search, download, and run software you wish on your Deepin computer. You are required to be able to edit text in administrator mode to practice this. For experienced persons, you may want to go to Sources.list section right away.

  • Perfect Server Automated ISPConfig 3 Installation on Debian 10 and Ubuntu 20.04

    This tutorial will take you through installing your own ISPConfig 3 single server setup using the ISPConfig auto-installer. This installer follows the old Perfect Server guides but is more modular and easy to follow. If you want to set up a multiserver setup with dedicated servers for each service instead, see the Perfect Multiserver guide.

    This guide works for both Debian 10 and Ubuntu 20.04. We will use the hostname server1.example.com. Replace it where necessary.

  • 5 Practical Examples of “cd” Command in Linux - LateWeb.Info

    There are many commands in Linux and for this reason many people are worried about using the terminal. For this reason, today we will look at one of the main commands in Linux, the CD command. We will learn its most basic ways to use it and try to make your Linux experience more enjoyable.

    What is the cd command? The cd (change directory) command was developed with the main purpose of changing the directory we are working in to move to another, if necessary. This cd command is a system integrated command, a.k. no external program or application is required, as it is executed directly by the Linux Shell. The cd command is available in all current Linux distributions.

Noise With Blanket

Filed under
Software

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Journal Expats, Linux Experiment, and Krita Artwork

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • You Should Open Source Now, Ask Me How!

    Katherine Druckman chats with Petros Koutoupis and Kyle Rankin about FOSS (Free and Open Source Software), the benefits of contributing to the projects you use, and why you should be a FOSS fan as well.

  • System76 starts their own desktop environment, Arch goes the easy route - Linux & Open Source news

    This time, we have System76 working on their own desktop environment based on GNOME, Arch Linux adding a guided installer, Google winning its court case against Oracle on the use of Java in Android, and Facebook is leaking data online, again. Become a channel member to get access to a weekly patroncast and vote on the next topics I'll cover

  • Timelapse: inking a comic page in Krita (uncommented)

    An uncommented timelapse while inking this page 6 of episode 34 of my webcomic Pepper&Carrot ( https://www.peppercarrot.com/ ). During the process, I thought about activating the recorder and I even put a webcam so you can see what I'm doing on the tablet too. I'm not doing it for everypages; because you can imagine the weight on disk about saving around 10h of videos like this; and also how it is not multi-tasking: when I record, you don't see me open the door to get the mail of the postman, you don't see me cleaning temporary accident of a cat bringing back a mouse at home, you don't see me typing to solve a merge request issue to merge a translation of Pepper&Carrot.

Kernel Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
  • [Intel-gfx] [RFC 00/28] Old platform/gen kconfig options series
  • Patches Resubmitted For Linux With Selectable Intel Graphics Platform Support

    Back in early 2018 were patches proposed for selectable platform support when building Intel's kernel graphics driver so users/distributions if desired could disable extremely old hardware support and/or cater kernel builds for specific Intel graphics generations. Three years later those patches have been re-proposed.

    The patches then and now are about allowing selectable Intel graphics "Gen" support at kernel configure/build time so that say the i8xx support could be removed or other specific generations of Intel graphics handled by the i915 kernel driver. This disabling could be done if phasing out older hardware support, seeking smaller kernel images, or other similar purposes. The patches don't change any default support levels but leaves things as-is and simply provides the knobs for disabling select generations of hardware.

  • Linux Kernel Runtime Guard 0.9.0 Is Released

    Linux Kernel Runtime Guard (LKRG) is a security module for the Linux kernel developed by Openwall. The latest release adds compatibility with Linux kernels up to soon to be released 5.12, support for building LKRG into kernel images, support for old 32-bit x86 machines and more. Loading the LKRG 0.9.0 module will cause a kernel panic and a complete halt if SELinux is enabled.

  • Hans de Goede: Logitech G15 and Z-10 LCD-screen support under Linux

    A while ago I worked on improving Logitech G15 LCD-screen support under Linux. I recently got an email from someone who wanted to add support for the LCD panel in the Logitech Z-10 speakers to lcdproc, asking me to describe the process I went through to improve G15 support in lcdproc and how I made it work without requiring the unmaintained g15daemon code.

Devuan 4.0 Alpha Builds Begin For Debian 11 Without Systemd

Filed under
Debian

Debian 11 continues inching closer towards release and it looks like the developers maintaining the "Devuan" fork won't be far behind with their re-base of the distribution focused on init system freedom.

The Devuan fork of Debian remains focused on providing Debian GNU/Linux without systemd. Devuan Beowulf 3.1 is their latest release based on Debian 10 while Devuan Chimaera is in the works as their re-base for Debian 11.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install Vocal modern podcast client on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    Looking for a dedicated Podcast app on Ubuntu Linux then try out Elementary OS’s Vocal Podcast that is available to install on most of the Linux system using Flatpak packages. Of course, we can use major music players for podcasts but the dedicated ones have their own perks because of various handy features.

  • How to install freeBSD 13.0 plus XFCE desktop and basic applications

    In this video, I am going to show how to Install freeBSD 13.0 plus XFCE desktop and some basic applications.

  • Install Discord On Linux

    When you divide gaming into two eras, then you get gaming before the advent of Discord and after the advent of Discord. It has changed how gamers used to communicate during a game. It’s not that there was no messaging app earlier, but Discord made it extremely easy to create communities and upgraded team communication very quickly.

    Today Discord has become a go-to app for team communications. One can create a Discord server and allow its members to use text or voice for sharing information. Or even create private channels to only allow certain members to join.

  • How to Install IDLE Python IDE on Ubuntu 20.04

    IDLE stands for Integrated DeveLopment Environment. It is an IDE for Python, written in Python language itself and based on Tkinter with bindings to the Tk widget set. IDLE is most suitable for beginners as it is easy to use and not feature overloaded. Hence, it is very popular in educational environments.

  • How the ping program works in Linux

    Ping is a computer program for network administration used to check the availability of active devices on the Internet or local networks. The name ping comes from sonar terminology. Ping works on the principle of echo, sending a message via ICMP protocol to a remote computer. The message contains a “request” for a response from the host. In this process, the time from the transmission of the message to the time of its receipt by the original computer (two-way) is measured and any packet loss is recorded. The test results are printed on the screen in the form of statistical messages.

    Let’s start with an example to check the connection to the google.com host. To do this, we just need to type in a terminal ping google.com, but because the program will not stop the ping alone we have to do stop it manually. To do this we must use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + C.

  • How To Change Timezone on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to change the timezone on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, By default, when a server is provisioned a default timezone will get configured automatically with the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). You can change the timezone later using the below method.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step set or change timezone on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Deploying the Mosquitto MQTT message broker on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1 - Red Hat Developer

    Mosquitto is a lightweight message broker that supports the Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) protocol. Mosquitto is widely used in Internet of Things (IoT) and telemetry applications, where a fully-featured message broker like Red Hat AMQ would be unnecessarily burdensome. Mosquitto also finds a role as a message bus for interprocess communication in distributed systems. Because it avoids complex features, Mosquitto is easy to tune and handles substantial application workloads with relatively modest memory and CPU resources.

    There are essentially two stages to making Mosquitto available on Red Hat OpenShift. First, you need to containerize the application in a way that is broadly compatible with OpenShift. Part of containerization involves installing the container image in a repository, from which OpenShift can download it. Second, you need to deploy the containerized image in a pod, providing whatever properties and configuration are necessary for the specific installation. The first half of this article shows how to build Mosquitto into an image suitable for use in a container. The second half will show you how to configure and deploy the Mosquitto image on OpenShift.

  • Use the DNF local plugin to speed up your home lab - Fedora Magazine

    If you are a Fedora Linux enthusiast or a developer working with multiple instances of Fedora Linux then you might benefit from the DNF local plugin. An example of someone who would benefit from the DNF local plugin would be an enthusiast who is running a cluster of Raspberry Pis. Another example would be someone running several virtual machines managed by Vagrant. The DNF local plugin reduces the time required for DNF transactions. It accomplishes this by transparently creating and managing a local RPM repository. Because accessing files on a local file system is significantly faster than downloading them repeatedly, multiple Fedora Linux machines will see a significant performance improvement when running dnf with the DNF local plugin enabled.

    I recently started using this plugin after reading a tip from Glenn Johnson (aka glennzo) in a 2018 fedoraforum.org post. While working on a Raspberry Pi based Kubernetes cluster running Fedora Linux and also on several container-based services, I winced with every DNF update on each Pi or each container that downloaded a duplicate set of rpms across my expensive internet connection. In order to improve this situation, I searched for a solution that would cache rpms for local reuse. I wanted something that would not require any changes to repository configuration files on every machine. I also wanted it to continue to use the network of Fedora Linux mirrors. I didn’t want to use a single mirror for all updates.

  • Create a git branch archive

    This week I needed to prepare some files for the buyers of my book Deployment from Scratch. I use various git repositories for the content and case studies, and I needed to create archives for the current release quickly.

    Luckily, I found out this is much easier than I made it to.

Stable Kernels: 4.4.267, 4.9.267, 4.14.231, 4.19.188, 5.4.113, 5.10.31 and 5.11.15

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.267 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.267

Linux 4.14.231

Linux 4.19.188

Linux 5.4.113

Linux 5.10.31

Linux 5.11.15

Raspberry Pi-like SBC taps RK3566

Filed under
Android
Linux

Pine64 has posted specs for a “Quartz64 Model B” SBC with the quad -A55, NPU-equipped Rockchip RK3566, up to 8GB LPDDR4, optional eMMC, WiFi/BT, GbE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 3x USB, and 40-pin and M.2 expansion.

In February, Pine64 revealed a Quart64 Model A SBC modeled roughly on the RK3399-based RockPro64, but with Rockchip’s 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A55 RK3566. At the time, the company listed some basic specs for a smaller, Raspberry Pi sized Model B based on the same RK3566 SoC. Pine64 has now posted full specs.

Read more

In loving memory of Ricardo Pontes

Filed under
Obits

Ricardo was one of the first Brazilian community members, contributing for more than 10 years, a good friend, and a mentor to other volunteers.

His work was instrumental on the Firefox OS days and his passion inspiring. His passing is finding us sadden and shocked. Our condolences to his family and friends.

Below are some words about Ricardo from fellow Mozillians (old and new)...

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SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.0 docs support mega-easy installation

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro is a modern system primarily designed for edge computing. The main features of SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro are predictability and reliability, thanks to the read-only root file system and transactional updates. The read-only file system ensures that the system cannot be altered during runtime and that the system behaves the same way after each reboot. Transactional updates enable you to update the system without influencing the running system and always provide a rollback.

For SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.0, we have currently released the following documentation (a huge “thank you” goes to Jana Halackova for the docs and Lukáš Kucharczyk for the release notes)...

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GNOME 40, KDE Frameworks, Plasma Update in Tumbleweed

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
SUSE

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since last week’s blog.

The snapshots brought the much anticipated GNOME 40 as well as an update of KDE Frameworks 5.81.0, Plasma 5.21.4 and several other packages.

The 20210414 snapshots was a monster; the amount of packages updated in the snapshot was ginormous. The update to GNOME 40 brought some significant changes to the desktop environment. New visual changes with rounded corners, and gestures like a three-finger swipe to move between workspaces were among the improvements in the release. The app launcher is more customizable and more intuitive to navigate with a mouse. Another desktop environment that was updated in the snapshot was Plasma 5.21.4, which had color scheme fixes and a fix for a broken keyboard configurations with single layout on Wayland. The release also set the preferred aspect ratio to “21:9” over “64:27” with KScreen. KDE Frameworks 5.81.0 added high-brightness and low-brightness Breeze Icons and the user interface builder Kirigami fixed a potential crash in the SizeGroup. Even Xfce had in update in the snapshot; this update in the xfce4-settings 4.16.1 package fixed scaling and updated translations. Dependencies were update in the upgrade to nodejs15 15.14. There was a minor fix for the cups printing package and xterm 367 updated some patches and improved responsiveness of the terminal. Linux Kernel 5.11.12 arrived in the snapshot and had several Advanced Linux Sound Architecture fixes and a commit for a nosy driver with Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)2021-3483. Both ruby2.7 and ruby3.0 received minor updates to fix an XML vulnerability and GStreamer 1.18.4 fixed mpeg-2 video handling and a memory leak. Several YaST packages also had updates.

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My journey into Linux system administration

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

My journey with Linux started in my first year of college when I encountered tools like Git, GitHub, Maven, Jenkins, and others. I first worked with Windows. With Linux, I had a completely different kind of environment to work with. I began my Linux journey with virtual machines.

After spending two years with Linux in virtual machines, I decided to use Linux on my primary computer. I learned about Linux system architecture, filesystems, and created a script that adds users to Linux-based operating systems. You may find links to that article and all of my published articles on my Enable Sysadmin profile (Kshitiz Saini).

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Games: Total War: ROME REMASTERED, Wasteland 3: The Battle of Steeltown, Jupiter Hell, ΔV: Rings of Saturn

Filed under
Gaming
  • Check out some of the Quality of Life improvements coming to Total War: ROME REMASTERED

    Total War: ROME REMASTERED is the upcoming release from Feral Interactive and Creative Assembly that replaces the original and brings it to Linux too and there's a lot improved with it.

    Not only is it the first Total War to come with full cross-platform online play out of the box for Linux, macOS and Windows plus improved visuals and more it's also bringing in plenty of Quality of Life enhancements to improve the overall experience. These QoL improvements include: an enhanced camera, campaign map vibrancy, both classic and remastered rule-sets, new merchant options, sixteen new playable factions and a whole lot more.

  • Wasteland 3: The Battle of Steeltown announced for June 3 and it sounds explosive | GamingOnLinux

    Wasteland 3 from inXile Entertainment is set to expand on June 3 with the first expansion Wasteland 3: The Battle of Steeltown and it sounds like it's going to be full of action.

    "The towering factory complex of Steeltown manufactures all the tech that keeps Colorado running and the Patriarch in power—trucks, armor, weapons, and robots. But deliveries from Steeltown have stopped cold, and all the Patriarch is getting from Abigail Markham—Steeltown's leader—are excuses. When he sends the Rangers to investigate, they find the place is a powder keg with the fuse already lit. The workers are striking, bandits raid with impunity, and nobody is allowed through the gates, not even on the business of the Patriarch. Without help, Steeltown could crash and burn for good, and take Markham with it—but maybe that's just what it needs."

  • Intense roguelike Jupiter Hell gets a mini quest system and more lore | GamingOnLinux

    Jupiter Hell, the awesome roguelike from ChaosForge continues getting regular Early Access upgrades and the gameplay continues getting a bit deeper with this latest 0.9.8 "Message" update.

    Ready for some lore? How about their first iteration of a quest-like system? Well, both are in now in the Message update. Spread throughout the game you can now interact with special terminals to get some lore text, as well as information on items, events or other content that is available later in the levels - so this will affect which branches you pick when you progress through the game. There's also a Journal now to follow, intermission screens between moons to show off your stats, exotic weapons now have their own dedicated perks and more.

    [...]

    Jupiter Hell still continues running amazingly well on Linux, with thanks to their use of Vulkan it performs great!

  • ΔV: Rings of Saturn now gives the full game in the demo, with one catch

    Get ready to explore space, mine some rocks and lose yourself in the hard sci-fi game ΔV: Rings of Saturn which just expanded the demo in a very big way.

    "For a few months now we’ve been thinking about the best form of ΔV: Rings of Saturn demo. We’ve concluded that, having the whole product done, we want a gamer to see its quality, but not by playing the limited version. Therefore, ΔV: Rings of Saturn, a hard sci-fi, top-down physics-based space mining simulator is available for free on Steam for everyone." — Kodera Software

    [...]

    Back in May 2020 the developer reported the percentage of Linux sales was good too, with the developer mentioning recently how "Linux players are awesome" due to their bug reports and it seems Linux sales are still doing well.

Get GNOME 40 in openSUSE via GNOME Next [Testing Only]

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

Do you want to try out the latest GNOME 40 in openSUSE? This is how you can try it right now.
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GNOME 40 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed’s Repos, Update Now

Filed under
SUSE

Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling-release distribution are in for a treat this weekend as the software repositories have been populated with the core packages and apps from the recently released GNOME 40 stack.

More and more distros that are offering the GNOME desktop environment on their repositories or as part of a live/installation ISO are now trying to upgrade the packages to the GNOME 40 release, which arrived last month with a major design overhaul to the Activities Overview, as well as various improvements to the GNOME Shell UI and most of the core GNOME apps.

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Kate Editor Set to Become KDE’s Answer to Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code

Filed under
Software

Remember Kate? It's the default text editor in KDE Plasma environment and it is going to become a lot more awesome.
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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The State Of OpenCL To Vulkan Compute Layers On Linux In April 2021

    It is, in theory, possible to run OpenCL applications on Linux using any graphics driver capable of doing Vulkan Compute. We have examined the alternatives for doing so and found them to be technically interesting and practically useless. It may become possible to run Blender with OpenCL compute using Vulkan at some point in the far distant future. Don't expect to be able to do that today or next month.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Between Loads

    I’m typing this up between loads and runs of various games I’m testing, since bug reports for games are somehow already a thing, and there’s a lot of them.

    The worst part about testing games is the unbelievably long load times (and startup videos) most of them have, not to mention those long, panning camera shots at the start of the game before gameplay begins and I can start crashing.

    But this isn’t a post about games.

    No, no, there’s plenty of time for such things.

    This is a combo post: part roundup because blogging has been sporadic the past couple weeks, and part feature.

  • Sid Meier: More than Just Civilization

    Let’s face it. The video games world is not getting any younger, and the most famous creators of yesterday are now well past 60. Sid Meier is no exception. I picked up his memoir and it was a good read. I am now pretty confident that we will see more publications in the same vein, as the age of pioneers reaches an end.

    For Linux gamers, Sid Meier’s current company, Firaxis, is a well known benefactor – one of the few friendly to our cause: Civilization 5, 6, and Beyond Earth have all been ported to Linux by Aspyr with the blessing of Firaxis. Even back in the Loki days, Civilization: Call To Power was one of the first games ported to Linux… while this was not a game by Sid Meier – just one from Activision who had secured the rights to the franchise. This is one of the things you will learn as you go through this memoir.

  • My Dog's Garage Runs OpenBSD

    I was inspired by the April 2017 article in undeadly.org about getting OpenBSD running on a Raspberry Pi 3B+. My goal was to use a Raspberry Pi running OpenBSD to monitor the temperature in my garage from my home. My dog has his own little "apartment" inside the garage, so I want to keep an eye on the temperature. (I don't rely on this device. He sleeps inside the house whenever he wants.)

    If anything seems wrongheaded, please chalk it up to a frothy mixture of enthusiasm, ignorance, stubbornness, and "just-because-I-wanted-to-do-it-this-way-ness."

  • News: Finland implements API framework proposed by the European Commission

                         

                           

    The Ministry of Finance set up the project on opening up and using public data in Finland on 30 April 2020. It will put into effect the aims given in the Government Programme by promoting wider and more effective public data use through society. The project will last until the end of 2022 and aims to promote the coherent use of data and functions, primarily through APIs. At the moment, there are no common principles for API development in the public sector in Finland.

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