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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Servers and GPUs: Theano, DevOps, Kubernetes, AWS Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:21am
Story Chrome and Firefox Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:17am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:12am
Story Software and Games Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:10am
Story GNOME: GitLab, LVFS and GStreamer Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:08am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:04am
Story Ubuntu: Data Collection, a Decade at Canonical, Xubuntu 18.04 Community Wallpaper Contest Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:03am
Story KDE: Qt, Cutelyst, Spectacle, Kirigami Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:00am
Story Openwashing: Blockchains, .NET Promotion and 'OpenAPI' Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 7:55am
Story LibreOffice 6 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 7:24am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • util-linux v2.32 -- what's new?

    This release (rc1 now) is without dramatic changes and game-changing improvements.

    We have again invested our time and love to make cal(1) more usable. The most visible change is possibility to specify calendar system.

  • GLXVND Support Lands In Git For X.Org Server 1.20

    There's been a lot of activity in xorg-server Git the past few days, making it look like the developers may be trying to wrap up the very long X.Org Server 1.20 cycle. The latest major feature work landing is GLXVND.

    GLXVND is the feature work spearheaded last year by NVIDIA for what is effectively "server-side GLVND", or taking their OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library approach from the user-space OpenGL drivers and applying the same concept to allowing multiple GLX modules to happily co-exist on the same running X.Org Server.

  • Weblate 2.19

    Weblate 2.19 has been released today. The biggest improvement are probably addons to customize translation workflow, but there are some other enhancements as well.

  • Apache Camel URI completion in VS Code XML Editor and Eclipse Che
  • Certmonger, SELinux and Keystores in random locations
  • Red Hat’s David Egts on 3 Application Migration Approaches

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s public sector, told MeriTalk in an interview published Wednesday that lift and shift, augment with new layers and rewrite are three approaches government agencies and companies can adopt to modernize aging applications.

    Egts said the effectiveness of the approaches depends on the application, contextual factors and business and that agencies should work with system integrators that help execute those three app migration approaches.

  • Today’s Brokerage Rating: Tyson Foods, Inc. (TSN), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • CenturyLink, Inc. (CTL) is at $17.58 per share and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) is listed at $134.19
  • Airtop2 Inferno Offers i7-7700K + GeForce GTX 1080 While Being Fanless
  • ‘Like a phoenix from the ashes’ – Nokia’s brand value jumped a whopping 70% last year [Ed: Maybe because they got rid of Microsoft and Windows]

    Anderson credits Nokia's rise in value to its two-pronged strategy. On the one hand, there's the core Networks business – which, despite a recent slowdown, has done well and could see a boost from ensuing 5G rollouts – and, on the other, the company's lucrative and fast-growing tech licensing operation.

    [...]

    Nokia Technologies, the company's patent licensing business, has become a major revenue source for Nokia, which has even turned to third party litigation specialists to help secure a portfolio of patents dating back to the company's heyday (Nokia ranked 9th on Brand Finance's list in 2008).

  • F-Droid: an alternative to Google Play

    It is important to talk about Android at Linux conferences like linux.conf.au, Peter Serwylo said to start his talk. Android is deployed on millions or billions of devices, but it does suffer from some problems that F-Droid, an alternative Android app store, tries to address. The title of his talk noted that F-Droid is private, secure, free, and open, all of which are desirable traits for many in our community.

    Serwylo got interested in Android because it was running on the first smart device he ever owned. He chose Android because he was getting interested in free software and recognized that Android was a well-supported version of Linux that was available on lots of different devices. But he found that the Android experience was not quite the "Linux experience that you are used to".

Debian and Canonical’s Juju

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Everything about the Mini-DebConf in Hamburg in May 2018

    With great joy we are finally offically announcing the Debian MiniDebConf which will take place in Hamburg (Germany) from May 16 to 20, with three days of Debcamp style hacking, followed by two days of talks, workshops and more hacking. And then, Monday the 21st is also a holiday in Germany, so you might choose to extend your stay by a day! (Though there will not be an official schedule for the 21st.)

  • Xerox printers on Debian - an update

    I think the lamest part of my current job is that we heavily rely on multifunction printers. We need to print a high volume of complicated documents on demand. You know, 1500 copies of a color booklet printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle kind of stuff.

    Pardon my French, but printers suck big time. The printer market is an oligopoly clusterfuck and it seems it keeps getting worse (looking at you, Fuji-Xerox merger). None of the drivers support Linux properly, all the printers are big piles of proprietary code and somehow the corporations selling them keep adding features no one needs.

  • Debian won Linux Journal's Readers' Choice Award for Best Linux Distribution!
  • Storage Made Easy adds Charm to Canonical’s Juju ecosystem

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source project management: The art of herding cats

    Dave Page of EnterpriseDB talks about the challenges of organising the Postgres community and why Oracle's cloud does not feature in his firm's plans

  • We're still learning from this failed blockchain experiment

    The past six months have seen cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Ethereum go from rounding errors in the global economy to center stage at mainstream banking conferences. Much of the current fervor concerns the skyrocketing valuations of cryptocurrencies and tokens, and using them as an investment. All this has an interesting backstory—one with roots in an open organization effort attempted two years ago: The DAO.

  • A cyborg's journey

    Karen Sandler has been giving conference talks about free software and open medical devices for the better part of a decade at this point. LWN briefly covered a 2010 LinuxCon talk and a 2012 linux.conf.au (LCA) talk; her talk at LCA 2012 was her first full-length keynote, she said. In this year's edition, she reviewed her history (including her love for LCA based in part on that 2012 visit) and gave an update on the status of the source code for the device she has implanted on her heart.

    Sandler is the executive director of the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC); she is also a lawyer, but "I do all of my legal work for good now", she said with a chuckle. She does pro bono work for FSF and the GNOME Foundation, for example. She asked how many in the audience had attended LCA 2012 in Ballarat, which turned out to be around one-third (interestingly, the number of first-time attendees was nearly the same).

  • LibreOffice 6.0: The stats so far

    On January 31, we released LibreOffice 6.0 (shortly followed up by 6.0.1). So what has happened in the last two weeks? Let’s look at some statistics…

  • FLOSS Weekly 471: ScanCode

    Simon was co-host of FLOSS Weekly 471, which featured the ScanCode Toolkit. ScanCode analyses a source package and lists what licenses are found in it. The toolkit can be used as part of a larger solution and together with the new AboutCode Manager provides open source compliance staff with an easy way to know what licenses they are actually dealing with.

  • A GPL-enforcement update
  • Open-source drug discovery

    An apparent linux.conf.au tradition is to dedicate a keynote slot to somebody who is applying open-source principles to make the world better in an area other than software development. LCA 2018 was no exception; professor Matthew Todd took the stage to present his work on open-source drug discovery. The market for pharmaceuticals has failed in a number of ways to come up with necessary drugs at reasonable prices; perhaps some of those failures can be addressed through a community effort.

    Todd started by noting that he must normally begin his talks by selling open source to a room that is hostile to the idea; that tends not to be a problem at LCA. The chemistry community, he said, is playing catch-up, trying to mimic some of the things that the open-source community has done. The first step was to apply these principles to basic research before moving on to drug discovery; the latter proved to be harder, since it's typically a process that is shrouded in secrecy.

  • The Last Of The MPEG-2 Patents Have Expired

    Just like with the recent expiry of the MP3 patents and AC3, the last of the MPEG-2 patents have now expired.

  • Hey Microsoft, Stop Installing Apps On My PC Without Asking

Openwashing Databases: iRODS, ArangoDB, Altibase

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • iRODS Consortium Carries Open Source Data Management Software Forward

    Integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS) is used across the globe in industries ranging from the life and physical sciences to media and entertainment, but the software’s origins can be traced back over two decades to a team at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and a project known as the Storage Resource Broker (SRB).

  • ArangoDB Publishes Industry-Wide Open Source NoSQL Performance Benchmark

    ArangoDB, a leading provider of native multi-model NoSQL database solutions, today announced the latest findings of its open source NoSQL performance benchmark series. To enable vendors to respond to the results and contribute improvements, ArangoDB has published the necessary scripts required to repeat the benchmark. The goal of the benchmark is to measure the performance of each database system when there is no cache used. The benchmark is completely open source and therefore driven by community input.

  • Altibase goes open source, says it ‘directly challenges’ Microsoft, IBM and Oracle

    Following the recent announcement that the global software firm is open source, Altibase says it “directly challenges” the other companies by providing equal functionality at a much lower cost. Customers will save money by not having to buy in-memory and disk-resident databases separately, says Altibase. It can easily replace or supplement Oracle as well.

RISC-V Latest

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • First Open-Source RISC-V SoC for Linux Released

    Only months after debuting the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-compatible processor based on the open-source RISC-V chip architecture, RISC-V chipmaker SiFive has surprised the open-source community again by unveiling a full development board built around the ISA.

    Called the HiFive Unleashed, the new development board is built around SiFive's Freedom U540, which is based on the company's U54-MC Coreplex. The chip is a 64-bit, 4+1 multicore processor that fully supports Linux, as well as other operating systems such as FreeBSD and Unix. The development board itself features a 8GB of DDR4 with ECC, a gigabit ethernet port, 32 MB of quad SPI flash memory, a MicroSD card slot, and an FPGA mezzanine card (FMC) connector for allowing peripherals and other expansion devices to be attached to the board.

  • RISC-V plans to fulfill open-source architecture innovation dreams

    Digital transformation and the proliferation of big data are driving a renaissance in software development, requiring new advancements in hardware and processors. With a range of needs from a variety of users and platforms, standard instruction set architectures are no longer fulfilling all use cases as the demand for flexibility and improved performance increases.

    “The world is dominated by two instruction set architectures. … Both are great, but … they’re owned by their respective companies. RISC-V is a third entrant into this world … it’s completely open source,” said Martin Fink (pictured, right), chief technology officer of Western Digital Corp. Through the RISC-V initiative, Fink and Dave Tang (pictured, left), senior vice president of corporate marketing at Western Digital, are working to provide an instruction set that can be freely shared to encourage innovation.

  • Fedora/RISC-V: Runnable stage 4 disk images

Linux and DRM, Verizon Lockdown

Filed under
Linux
  • HDCP Content Protection Support Called For Integration In DRM-Next / Linux 4.17

    In November of last year is when we reported on a Google developer proposing HDCP patches for Intel's DRM Linux driver. In this case, DRM as in the Direct Rendering Manager but HDCP as in the controversial High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection. HDCP is the digital copy protection for DP/DVI/HDMI for preventing HDCP-encrypted content from being played on unauthorized devices.

  • Verizon Begins Locking Down Its Phones Again, Purportedly To 'Stop Theft'

    If you've been around a while, you probably know that Verizon has an adversarial relationship with openness and competition. The company's history is rife with attempts to stifle competing emerging technologies that challenged Verizon's own business interests, from its early attempts to block GPS and tethering apps so users would have to subscribe to inferior and expensive Verizon services, to its attempts to block competing mobile payment services to force users (again) onto Verizon's own, inferior products. And that's before you get to Verizon's attempts to kill net neutrality and keep the broadband industry uncompetitive.

    In the earlier years, Verizon had a horrible tendency to lock down its devices to a crippling and comical degree. But with the rise of net neutrality, competition from carriers like T-Mobile, and open access conditions affixed to certain spectrum purchased by Verizon, the company slowly-but-surely loosened its iron grip on mobile devices. But let's be clear: the company had to be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the new, more open future we all currently enjoy, where (by and large) you can install whatever apps you like on your device, and attach most mainstream devices (with some caveats) to Verizon's network.

    That's why more than a few eyebrows were raised after Verizon gave CNET the early exclusive news (apparently in the hopes that they'd frame it generously, which they did) that the company will soon be locking down its smartphones as part of a purported effort to "combat theft." Carriers have been justly criticized (and sued) for doing too little to prevent theft, in part because they profit on both sides of the equation -- both when a customer comes crying to Verizon to buy a new phone, and when the user with the stolen phone heads to Verizon to re-activate it on a new line.

What is a Linux "oops"?

Filed under
Linux

If you check the processes running on your Linux systems, you might be curious about one called "kerneloops". And that’s “kernel oops”, not “kerne loops” just in case you didn’t parse that correctly. Put very bluntly, an “oops” is a deviation from correct behavior on the part of the Linux kernel. Did you do something wrong? Probably not. But something did. And the process that did something wrong has probably at least just been summarily knocked off the CPU. At worst, the kernel may have panicked and abruptly shut the system down.

Read more

Games, Unity3D (Microsoft Mono) and Microsoft Direct3D

Filed under
Gaming

Mozilla: Sponsored Stories and New Release of Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox, Pocket and Sponsored Stories

    Well, well, remember when I told you - the more desperate Mozilla gets vis-a-vis its market share, the more aggressive they will get with pushing "quality" content onto its users? I did, I did. Well, the bonfires of the Mr. Robot fiasco have hardly cooled, and now there's a new drama developing. Mozilla will start rolling a pilot that tests sponsored stories in the Pocket recommendations section on the New Tab page.

    Since I'm usually a blithely cheerful chap, I'm actively looking for stories to sour my mood, and so I was excited (this is sales lingo, we will get to that) to read this announcement. After all, writing about how everything is peachy and efficient and good in the tech world is boring, we need these little burdocks of greed to make things complicated. After me, pioneers.

    [...]

    Actually, it does not take a wizard to figure things out. Just look what happened in the past five years, ever since the mobile world exploded. For instance, thinking wildly about some rather common examples, Windows 7 to Windows 10, and the amount of pesky, online and telemetry stuff. Just compare Skype 7.40, the last classic version. and the toy factory moronity that is Skype 8. Windows Control Panel to Windows Settings. Gnome 2 to Gnome 3. Oh, Firefox 3.6 to Firefox whatever.

    What you see is that menus get deeper and deeper and deeper and more obfuscated, with focus on aesthetic minimalism (mobile) that goes directly against user intuition and efficiency. You need more and more actions and mouse clicks to achieve the same results you could half a decade before. Now imagine what will happen in five or even ten years. Consider yourself lucky you were there to witness the early days of the Internet, when it was still all naive and innocent and not just pure money.

    [...]

    Some people may assume that I have a personal problem with Mozilla and Firefox. Not really. It's just I don't like hypocrisy, and I do not like being herded toward the pen that reads IDIOTS. I fully understand that Mozilla needs quiche. Fine, state it upfront. Don't veil it in bullshit. The words privacy, freedom and similar slogans mean nothing when you put them side by side with sponsored stories. You want money, start charging money for your browser. There's nothing wrong with that. And I would gladly pay for a high-quality product - and when needed, I do.

    I also wish that we had alternatives - the more the merrier. Alas, the exact opposite is happening. As time goes by, it will become even more difficult to have (supposedly free) products that really cater to their users. The profit slope is a one-way direction. Once you make a margin, you need to make more margin and more margin and more margin. It never stops.

    Firefox is a completely different product than it was a decade ago. It's now a big boy, trying to compete in the big arena. There's no room for niceties anymore. The only thing you can do is try to prepare for the inevitable day when this salesy nonsense becomes too much, so when you do switch, you try to do it elegantly and smartly. I cannot guarantee there's actually going to be a nice and peaceful browser for you out there when that moment comes, so if you want to sleep all relaxed, don't. The old Internet is dying, and the future does not belong to you and me or anyone willing to read this entire article without skipping words. The best you can do is play the game, so at the very least, you will be a rich idealist one day rather than a poor user. Or better yet, a rich loser rather than a poor user.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 32
  • Reps On-boarding Team

    As you already know from our discourse topic, we have created an Onboarding Screening Team.

    The scope of this team is to help on evaluating the new applications to the Reps program by helping the Reps Council on this process.

  • Announcing Rust 1.24

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.24.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • Rust 1.24 Released With "rustfmt" Preview & Incremental Compilation By Default

    A fairly notable update to the Rust programming language compiler and its components is available today.

    With Rust 1.24 first up is a preview release of rustfmt, an official utility for formatting Rust code. Rustfmt applies a standard style of formatting to existing Rustlang code and is similar to the other LLVM-based code formatters.

Security: Blaming Russia for Windows Back Doors Being Exploited, New Updates, BuckHacker, and More

Filed under
Security

FOSS Project Spotlight: LinuxBoot

Filed under
Linux

The more things change, the more they stay the same. That may sound cliché, but it's still as true for the firmware that boots your operating system as it was in 2001 when Linux Journal first published Eric Biederman's "About LinuxBIOS". LinuxBoot is the latest incarnation of an idea that has persisted for around two decades now: use Linux as your bootstrap.

On most systems, firmware exists to put the hardware in a state where an operating system can take over. In some cases, the firmware and OS are closely intertwined and may even be the same binary; however, Linux-based systems generally have a firmware component that initializes hardware before loading the Linux kernel itself. This may include initialization of DRAM, storage and networking interfaces, as well as performing security-related functions prior to starting Linux. To provide some perspective, this pre-Linux setup could be done in 100 or so instructions in 1999; now it's more than a billion.

Read more

Software: Trizen, I Love Free Software Day, GIMP Bug Reporting and More

  • Trizen – A Lightweight AUR Package Manager For Arch-Based Systems

    Pacaur is unmaintained and the developer stepped back for unknown reason. Pacaur still works, however the Arch developers are suggesting to use another AUR package helper programs. I have already tried a few AUR helpers such as Packer, Yay, and Yaourt. Today we will see yet another AUR helper that I just came across. Say hello to Trizen, a lightweight AUR package manager written in Perl.

  • What open source software programs I love

    Earlier this week, someone asked me what Free software and open source software programs I really love. I thought I'd share that here, too.

    As I started to go through my favorite programs, I realized it was quite long. So I'm trying to keep the list short here, just the programs I use the most:

    I'll start with Linux. I first installed Linux in 1993, when I was still an undergraduate university student. When I heard about Linux, a free version of Unix that I could run on my 386 computer at home, I immediately wanted to try it out. My first Linux distribution was Softlanding Linux System (SLS) 1.03, with Linux kernel 0.99 alpha patch level 11. That required a whopping 2MB of RAM, or 4MB if you wanted to compile programs, and 8MB to run X windows.

  • I love Free Software Day 2018

    Today isn't just Valentines day, but also I love Free Software Day! I've been using (and contributing) Free Software for years now and don't want anything else. Even when I've given non-Free Software another chance, every time I was glad when I returned to Free Software.

    A big thank you goes out to all developers, sysadmins, network guru's, translators, bugsquashers and all other contributors.

    A small selection of tools/libraries/projects/organizations I'm thankful for this year: debian, ubuntu, terminator, mate, vi(m), firefox, thunderbird, postgresql, apache, kvm, libvirt, bash, openssh, nextcloud, workrave, audacious, vlc, mtp (Media Transfer Protocol), ext2/ext3/ext4/btrfs, mdadm, postfix, the linux kernel, fosdem, fsfe, eff, bitsoffreedom, ccc and kodi.

  • Automatic bug report and stack traces for GIMP

    While I was working on yet-another-crash without a backtrace, I realized that we could just generate automatic backtraces upon crashes and tell people about it. This is how I ended up writing a debug tool for GIMP, popping-up a dialog with a nice text encouraging to report bugs. You’ll notice that the main text is non-technical. The goal is not to display non-understandable error messages which nobody will understand. All the technical part is in the below section and is just to be copied by a single button click and reported to us verbatim.

  • [Proprietary] Master PDF Editor – A Cross-Platform Multifunctional PDF Editor

    Master PDF Editor is a powerful multi-purpose editor for easily and professionally viewing, scanning, creating, and modifying PDF documents.

    It features OCR functionality alongside the ability to add digital signatures to PDF files, to encrypt them, split a source document into multiple documents, and to merge several files into one, among other functions.

Defense Digital Service revamps Code.mil with clearer, more accessible guidance

Filed under
OSS

When the Defense Digital Service team launched Code.mil in February 2017, the goal was to propel the Department of Defense into the open source software community.

The team set up a repository on GitHub, got to work on a licensing agreement and by mid-March the first open-sourced project was posted.

But where there was excitement among the DoD engineering community, there also was a slight problem — the guidance on how to release code as code open source just wasn’t very accessible or clear.

Read more

GSoC Support for FOSS:

Google's Bogus Ad 'Blocker' for Chrome

Filed under
Google

Games: Project Zomboid, Prey, Maia, Momodora: Reverie Under The Moonlight, Communist Dogifesto, Dead Maze

Filed under
Gaming

GNOME Desktop/GTK: GNOME 3.27.90, ArcMPD, xdg-desktop-portal, Meson

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.27.90 released
  • ArcMPD – An Arc-Based Translucent GTK Theme for Minimalists

    We haven’t written about any themes since 2018 began so I think it is about time that happened. That’s why I’m happy to let you in on another beautiful theme you might not have known yet – ArcMPD.

    ArcMPD is a fork of the fan favorite Arc GTK theme and its inspiration is even implied in its name. Unlike Arc GTK theme, however, it features a more transparent header, sidebar; and window control buttons reminiscent of Apple’s OS X.

  • Moving a portal

    Most of the portals in use are implemented by a module called xdg-desktop-portal, with backend implementations for Gtk+ and KDE. Many of the portals in it, such as the important file chooser portal relies on a lowlevel portal called the document portal. It is a combined dbus and fuse service that controls access to files with fine-grained per-application permissions.

  • Meson's dependency manager in action building GTK

    It is easy to see how this makes it easier for newcomers to participate. There are no longer pages upon pages of instructions on how to set up a build environment and so on. All that is required is to clone one Git repo and start building. The build system will take care of all the rest.

Server: Kubernetes, Vitess, SDS, Service Mesh, CloudStack, OpenStack/Oracle

Filed under
Server
  • Kubernetes Monitoring with Prometheus

    Kubernetes makes management of complex environments easy, but to ensure availability it's crucial to have operational insight into the Kubernetes components and all applications running on the cluster. I believe monitoring is the backbone of a good production environment.

    Applications running in containers and orchestrated by Kubernetes are highly automated and dynamic, and so, when it comes to monitoring applications in these environments, traditional server-based monitoring tools designed for static services are not sufficient.

  • CNCF’s Vitess Scales MySQL with the Help of Kubernetes

    A technology developed by YouTube to shard large MySQL databases across multiple servers, Vitess, has become the 16th hosted project of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.

    Vitess was created for “people who love MySQL for its functionality, but have chosen not to use it because it does not scale well,” said Sugu Sougoumarane, one of the creators of Vitess who is now co-founder and chief technology officer at PlanetScale Data, a still-stealth startup centered around Vitess, in an interview with The New Stack.

  • Deepfence Emerges from Stealth with Container Security Platform

    Sandeep Lahane has been been quietly building his container security startup Deepfence since 2016. On Feb. 13, Deepfence emerged from its stealth mode, announcing the company's Security as a Microservice technology for container security.

    The Deepfence approach uses what the company refers to a a lightweight sidecar container, which runs alongside an organization's existing Docker and Kubernetes container deployments. Deepfence's technology makes use of artificial intelligence (AI) as well as policy driven rules, to help detect potential threats and enforce workload isolation.

  • What is Software Defined Storage?

    Software defined storage (SDS) decouples storage software from the underlying storage devices. It does this by creating a virtualized software management layer that operates above the storage hardware.

    While that definition may reasonably straight forward, many players in the data storage industry debate the specifics and details of what, exactly, is the true definition of SDS.

  • The History of the Service Mesh
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® CloudStack® v4.11
  • Apache CloudStack, KDE Plasma Update, Kubernetes Engine

    Apache CloudStack 4.11 was released this week after 8 months of development. According to Rohit Yadav, Apache CloudStack v4.11 Release Manager, "v4.11 brings several important structural changes such as better support for systemd and Java 8, migration to embedded Jetty, and a new and optimized Debian 9 based systemvm template." See the release notes for more info.

  • Oracle Sees Its Future in the Cloud as Data Center Footprint Set to Expand

    Oracle uses the open-source OpenStack cloud platform as the basis for its cloud services. Oracle has been actively involved in OpenStack since at least 2014, when it announced support for OpenStack on both Oracle Linux and Solaris-based systems.

  • Oracle’s Cloud: Perception vs. Reality

    Oracle announced an impressive cloud computing initiative this week; it was very nicely packaged. But the company initially did not even take the cloud seriously, and was very slow to realize that this cloud thing was going to be massively disruptive.

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More in Tux Machines

today's lefftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words
    Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.
  • Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People
    Since then, I have heard of another email provider that you may be interested in. It’s a little different, but it touts some of the same features ProtonMail does: privacy, security, open-source code, etc. It’s called Tutanota, and like ProtonMail, I am a very big fan.
  • Open FinTech Forum – Event preview, October 10-11, New York City.
  • The tracker will always get through
    A big objection to tracking protection is the idea that the tracker will always get through. Some people suggest that as browsers give users more ability to control how their personal information gets leaked across sites, things won't get better for users, because third-party tracking will just keep up. On this view, today's easy-to-block third-party cookies will be replaced by techniques such as passive fingerprinting where it's hard to tell if the browser is succeeding at protecting the user or not, and users will be stuck in the same place they are now, or worse. I doubt this is the case because we're playing a more complex game than just trackers vs. users. The game has at least five sides, and some of the fastest-moving players with the best understanding of the game are the adfraud hackers. Right now adfraud is losing in some areas where they had been winning, and the resulting shift in adfraud is likely to shift the risks and rewards of tracking techniques.
  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - February 16, 2018
    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from January 23 - February 16.
  • The major milestones of the Government Digital Service (GDS)
  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft
    Most people have heard of Google’s Tensorflow which was released at the end of 2015, but there’s an active codebase called PyTorch which is easier to understand, less of a black box, and more dynamic. Tensorflow does have solutions for some of those limitations (such as Tensorflow-fold, and Tensorflow-Eager) but these new capabilities remove the need for other features and complexity of Tensorflow. Google built a great system for doing static computation graphs before realizing that most people want dynamic graphs. Doh! [...] I wish PyTorch used the AGPL license. Most neural networks are run on servers today, it is hardly used on the Linux desktop. Data is central to AI and that can stay owned by FB and the users of course. The ImageNet dataset created a revolution in computer vision, so let’s never forget that open data sets can be useful.
  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news
    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.

Security: France, Munich, 'Smart' Meters, MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime

  • Highlights of the French cybersecurity strategy

    First, the document describes that in France cyberdefence and cyberoffence are separated. This is directly opposed to the models employed in Anglo-Saxon countries. But it’s shown as an asset. Key argument: it respects freedoms and civil liberties.

    The document then lists the six general objectives of cyberdefence, namely: prevention, anticipation, protection, detection, attribution, reaction (remediation). The strategy itself is complete, it focuses on civil, military, domestic, external, and international levels. Let’s say it’s a rarity in the business in strategic cybersecurity documents.

    [...]

    The strategy then mentions that one of the solutions could be to release source code and documentation after an end of support date.

  • The Munich Security Conference 2018

    Over the past five decades, the Munich Security Conference (MSC) has become the major global forum for the discussion of security policy. Each February, it brings together more than 450 senior decision-makers from around the world, including heads-of-state, ministers, leading personalities of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as high ranking representatives of industry, media, academia, and civil society, to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges.

  • Smart meters could leave British homes vulnerable to cyber attacks, experts have warned
    New smart energy meters that the Government wants to be installed in millions of homes will leave householders vulnerable to cyber attacks, ministers have been warned.
  • MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime: Researchers nail exploits
    "The flaws—dubbed Meltdown and Spectre—are in chips made by Intel and other major suppliers. They can allow hackers to steal data from the memory of running apps, including password managers, browsers and emails." The authors of the paper on arXiv, Caroline Trippel, Daniel Lustig, and Margaret Martonosi, discuss a tool they developed for "automatically synthesizing microarchitecture-specific programs capable of producing any user-specified hardware execution pattern of interest." They said they show "how this tool can be used for generating small microarchitecture-specific programs which represent exploits in their most abstracted form—security litmus tests."

How Linux became my job

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux. Read more