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Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu-Based LXLE 16.04.2 Gets an RC Build, Promises to Be the Best Release Ever Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:50am
Story These Are the Default Wallpapers of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Linux Distro Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:46am
Story Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 Review: Finally, an Android tablet built with enterprise users in mind Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:40am
Story Ubuntu 17.04 inches closer to production Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:29am
Story Linux 4.11 RC4 Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 6:55am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2017 - 9:32pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2017 - 9:30pm
Story Canonical and Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2017 - 9:27pm
Story Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2017 - 9:25pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2017 - 9:24pm

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack

    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.

  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF

    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime.

    There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.

  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener

    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.

  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project

    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. Smile

    It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.

  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor

    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.

  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune

    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.

  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech

    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.

  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting

    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.

  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Switching to Linux? 4 Operating Systems That Feel Like Home

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Switching to Linux opens the door to new tools and techniques to make your computing experience easier. But there is a learning curve, and depending on your choice of Linux operating system even navigating your desktop may be a challenge. Here’s how to make your new journey a little more familiar.

Read more

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.28 Snap Creator Tool with over 50 Improvements

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical released today Snapcraft 2.28, a new maintenance update to the tool application developers can use to package their apps as Snaps for Ubuntu Linux and other distros that support the Snappy technologies.

Read more

deepin 15.4 Linux Distro Promises to Let You Install the OS from Within Windows

Filed under
OS
Linux

At the end of February, the upcoming deepin 15.4 Linux distribution entered Beta stages of development, and now, one month later, the team published the Release Candidate version.

Read more

Embedded NUC SBC expands upon quad-core -A53 Snapdragon

Filed under
Android
Linux

Seco announced a wireless-ready “SBC-B47-eNUC” SBC that complies with the 4×4-inch eNUC form factor, and runs Linux or Android on a Snapdragon 410E.

Seco is prepping its first SBC based on the 101.6 x 101.6mm (4.0 x 4.0-inch) Embedded NUC (eNUC) SBC standard from the Standardization Group for Embedded Technologies (SGET). The eNUC form factor offers superior industrial grade characteristics, long term support, and efficient heat dissipation, claims Seco. The Linux- and Android-supported board supports applications including IoT gateways, home automation, robotics, digital signage, and HMI.

Read more

netOS Server 10.65.1 Released, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Xfce 4.12 Desktop

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Black Lab Software CEO Roberto J. Dohnert is informing Softpedia today about the release and general availability of the netOS Server 10.65.1 server-oriented and open-source operating system.

Read more

Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Final Beta Features GNOME 3.24 with Night Light, Flatpak 0.8

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

As part of yesterday's Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta release, the Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 operating system got its second Beta milestone bringing with it the latest development version of the recently released GNOME 3.24 desktop environment.

Read more

Also: Kubuntu 17.04 Beta 2 Includes KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop, KDE Applications 16.12.3

Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 Beta 2 Brings Latest GNOME 3.24 Apps, Budgie 10.2.9 Desktop

SAS, Canonical turn silly over open source

Filed under
OSS

Zemlin's job, in other words, isn't to convince companies to adopt open source, but rather to provide a home for the nurturing of open source projects, so they're worthy of adoption. Similarly, Canonical can focus on contributing code rather than spooking enterprises into adopting more.

And SAS? Well, it should probably start with 40 percent open source adoption and grow from there.

Read more

This Raspberry Pi-powered Linux computer packs a keyboard and display into a phone-sized case

Filed under
Linux

What would you get if you crossed the $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W with a smartphone? You might end up with the Zero Terminal.

The Zero Terminal is a homemade project by a maker known as Node, who has turned the Pi Zero W into a phone-sized computer with a slide-out QWERTY keyboard and touchscreen display.

Rather than running a phone OS, the Zero Terminal runs a full desktop, the Linux-based system Raspbian.

Read more

Linux-based imaging dev kit targets Basler cameras

Filed under
Linux

Critical Link unveiled an imaging dev kit based on its Cyclone V-based MitySOM-5CSx module, featuring an interface to Basler BCON dart cameras.

Critical Link announced a Linux-driven “MitySOM Embedded Imaging Dev Kit” for automation, robotics, motion control, and vision applications based on its Intel Cyclone V based MitySOM-5CSx COM and baseboard. The latter has been upgraded with an add-on board designed to connect with Basler’s BCON dart embedded area scan cameras. The MitySOM-5CSx baseboard plugs directly to a DisplayPort monitor with no need for a PC intermediary.

Read more

RADV vs. NVIDIA Vulkan/OpenGL Performance For Serious Sam 2017

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Yesterday I published some initial RADV Vulkan benchmarks for Serious Sam 2017, their "fusion" update to Serious Sam HD: The First Encounter. In this article are some comparison NVIDIA Linux Vulkan benchmark figures.

Read more

Manjaro: User-Friendly Arch Linux for Everyone

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Arch Linux has never been known as a user-friendly Linux distribution. In fact, the whole premise of Arch requires the end user make a certain amount of effort in understanding how the system works. Arch even goes so far as to use a package manager (aptly named, Pacman) designed specifically for the platform. That means all that apt-get and dnf knowledge you have doesn’t necessarily roll over.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Hyperledger Bond Trading Platform Goes Open Source

    A bond trading platform built on top of Hyperledger's Sawtooth Lake distributed ledger was made open source this week, alongside a release of a demo of the technology.

    The project, first announced in September 2016, was designed to demonstrate how bond trading and settlement can be streamlined using distributed ledgers. Created in partnership with the R3 consortium and eight participating banks, the working proof-of-concept has now also been displayed as a public demo on Sawtooth's website.

  • Coreboot Picks Up A New Kabylake Chromebook "Fizz"

    It may not be as exciting as hearing Dell looking at Coreboot, but another Intel-powered Chromebook is now supported by mainline Coreboot.

  • Cognitive Wi-Fi and disrupting the AP market with Open Source – with Mojo Networks – Wi FiNOW ep 59
  • Open source job opportunities grow at crisis groups

    Learn how you can use your open source skills to make a difference in the world.

  • Why LÖVE?

    This month, IndustrialRobot asked my opinion of FOSS game engines — or, more specifically, why I chose LÖVE.

    The short version is that it sort of landed in my lap, I tried it, I liked it, and I don’t know of anything I might like better. The long version is…

  • Mashape, Creator of Top Open Source API Management Tool Kong, Raises $18M
  • Defense department announces the launch of “Code.mil,” an experiment in open source

    The Department of Defense (DoD) announced the launch of Code.mil, an open source initiative that allows software developers around the world to collaborate on unclassified code written by federal employees in support of DoD projects.

    DoD is working with GitHub, an open source platform, to experiment with fostering more collaboration between private sector software developers and federal employees on software projects built within the DoD. The Code.mil URL redirects users to an online repository that will house code written for a range of projects across DoD for individuals to review and make suggested changes.

    [...]

    DoD faces unique challenges in open sourcing its code. Code written by federal government employees typically does not have copyright protections under U.S. and some international laws, which creates difficulties in attaching open source licenses.

  • RApiDatetime 0.0.1

    Very happy to announce a new package of mine is now up on the CRAN repository network: RApiDatetime.

  • FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

    In contrast to the restrictions many companies place on their workers, GitHub believes it can loosen the reins through the release of its Balanced Employee Intellectual Property Agreement (BEIPA).

    Technology companies often require that employees, as a condition of their employment, sign away the intellectual property rights to any work created while employed, even on personal time. Such contracts may even give companies ownership rights to work created during a limited period after employees leave the company.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Is there need for Red Hat Certification training in Zimbabwe?

    A local institution is investigating the need to train Systems Administrators/Engineers who use Linux towards Red Hat certifications. The course is targeted at individuals with at least 2 years experience using Linux.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) By The Numbers: Valuation in Focus
  • Fedora @ Konteh 2017 - event report

    This year we managed to get a booth on a very popular student job fair called Konteh. (Thanks to Boban Poznanovic, one of the event managers)

  • Fedora 26 Alpha status is NO-GO

    The result of the second Fedora 26 Alpha Go/No-Go Meeting is NO-GO. Due to blockers found during the last days [1] we have decided to delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release for one more week. There is going to be one more Go/No-Go meeting on the next Thursday, March 30th, 2017 at 17:00 UTC to verify we are ready for the release.

  • Fedora 26 Alpha Faces Another Delay

    Fedora 26 was set back by a delay last week and today it's been delayed again for another week.

    Fedora 26 Alpha has been delayed for another week when at today's Go/No-Go meeting it was given a No-Go status due to outstanding blocker bugs.

GNOME News: Gtef, GNOME 3.24 Release Video, Epiphany 3.24

Filed under
GNOME
  • Gtef 2.0 – GTK+ Text Editor Framework

    Gtef is now hosted on gnome.org, and the 2.0 version has been released alongside GNOME 3.24. So it’s a good time for a new blog post on this new library.

  • GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed

    Developer Sébastien Wilmet has provided an overview of Gtef with this text editing framework having been released in tandem with GNOME 3.24. Gtef provides a higher level API to make it easier for text editing or in developer-focused integrated development environments.

  • The Official GNOME 3.24 Release Video Is Here

    By now you’re probably well aware that a new update to the GNOME desktop has been released — and if you’re not, where’ve you been?! GNOME 3.24 features a number of neat new features, welcome improvements, and important advances, most of which we’ve documented in blog posts during the course of this week.

  • A Web Browser for Awesome People (Epiphany 3.24)

    Are you using a sad web browser that integrates poorly with GNOME or elementary OS? Was your sad browser’s GNOME integration theme broken for most of the past year? Does that make you feel sad? Do you wish you were using an awesome web browser that feels right at home in your chosen desktop instead? If so, Epiphany 3.24 might be right for you. It will make you awesome. (Ask your doctor before switching to a new web browser. Results not guaranteed. May cause severe Internet addiction. Some content unsuitable for minors.)

today's howtos

Filed under
Software
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Making your OpenStack monitoring stack highly available using Open Source tools
    Operators tasked with maintaining production environments are relying on monitoring stacks to provide insight to resource usage and a heads-up to threats of downtime. Perhaps the most critical function of a monitoring stack is providing alerts which trigger mitigation steps to ensure an environment stays up and running. Downtime of services can be business-critical, and often has extremely high cost ramifications. Operators working in cloud environments are especially reliant on monitoring stacks due to the increase in potential inefficiency and downtime that comes with greater resource usage. The constant visibility of resources and alerts that a monitoring stack provides, makes it a fundamental component of any cloud.
  • InfraRed: Deploying and Testing Openstack just made easier!
  • The journey of a new OpenStack service in RDO
    When new contributors join RDO, they ask for recommendations about how to add new services and help RDO users to adopt it. This post is not a official policy document nor a detailed description about how to carry out some activities, but provides some high level recommendations to newcomers based on what I have learned and observed in the last year working in RDO.
  • Getting to know the essential OpenStack components better
  • Getting to know core components, speed mentoring, and more OpenStack news
  • Testing LibreOffice 5.3 Notebookbar
    I teach an online CSCI class about usability. The course is "The Usability of Open Source Software" and provides a background on free software and open source software, and uses that as a basis to teach usability. The rest of the class is a pretty standard CSCI usability class. We explore a few interesting cases in open source software as part of our discussion. And using open source software makes it really easy for the students to pick a program to study for their usability test final project.
  • [Older] Drupal member sent out after BDSM lifestyle revealed

    Drupal, like many other open source projects, has a stated goal of welcoming and accepting all people, no matter their heritage, culture, sexual orientation, gender identity or other factors.

  • Controversy Erupts in Open-Source Community After Developer's Sex Life Made Public
    Drupal is a popular open-source content-management system, used to build websites. Like many other open-source projects, Drupal is guided by several committees that are supposed to be accountable to the community and its code of conduct, which enshrines values like "be considerate" and "be respectful." Also like many other open-source projects, Drupal attracts all sorts of people, some of whom are eclectic. Last week, under murky circumstances, Drupal creator Dries Buytaert banned one of the project's technical and community leaders, Larry Garfield. Buytaert attributed the decision to aspects of Garfield's private sex life. Many Drupal users and developers are up in arms about the perceived injustice of the move, exacerbated by what they see as a lack of transparency.
  • HospitalRun: Open Source Software for the Developing World
    When open source software is used for global health and global relief work, its benefits shine bright. The benefits of open source become very clear when human health and human lives are on the line. In this YouTube video, hear Harrisburg, Pennsylvania software developer Joel Worrall explain about HospitalRun software – open source cloud-based software used at developing world healthcare facilities.
  • Scotland emphasises sharing and reuse of ICT
    Scotland’s public administrations should focus on common, shared technology platforms, according to the new digital strategy, published on 22 March. The government says it wants to develop “shared infrastructure, services and standards in collaboration with our public sector partners, to reduce costs and enable resources to be focused on front-line services.”
  • [Older] OpenSSL Re-licensing to Apache License v. 2.0 To Encourage Broader Use with Other FOSS Projects and Products

    OpenSSL Launches New Website to Organize Process, Seeks to Contact All Contributors

  • Austria state secretary promotes open data
    The State Secretary at Austria’s Federal Chancellery, Muna Duzdar, is encouraging the making available of government data as open data. “The administration must set an example and support the open data culture by giving society its data back”, the State Secretary for Digitalisation said in a statement.
  • Study: Hungary should redouble open data initiatives
    The government of Hungary should redouble its efforts to make public sector information available as open data, and actively help to create market opportunities, a government white paper recommends. The ‘White Paper on National Data Policy’ was approved by the government in December.
  • Williamson School Board OKs developing open source science curriculum
    Science textbooks may be a thing of the past in Williamson County Schools. The Williamson County school board approved a proposal Monday night to use open source science resources instead of science textbooks. The switch will require a team of nine teachers to spend a year developing an open source curriculum.
  • How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access
    It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access.
  • #0: Introducing R^4
  • RcppTOML 0.1.2

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • FedEx Will Pay You $5 to Install Flash on Your Machine
    FedEx is making you an offer you can’t afford to accept. It’s offering to give you $5 (actually, it’s a discount on orders over $30) if you’ll just install Adobe Flash on your machine. Nobody who knows anything about online security uses Flash anymore, except when it’s absolutely necessary. Why? Because Flash is the poster child for the “security-vulnerability-of-the-hour” club — a group that includes another Adobe product, Acrobat. How unsafe is Flash? Let’s put it this way: seven years ago, Steve Jobs announced that Flash was to be forever banned from Apple’s mobile products. One of the reasons he cited was a report from Symantec that “highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009.” Flash security hasn’t gotten any better since.
  • Every once in a while someone suggests to me that curl and libcurl would do better if rewritten in a “safe language”
  • An insecure dishwasher has entered the IoT war against humanity

    Regel says that he has contacted Miele on a number of occasions about the issue, but had failed to get a response to his missives, and this has no updated information on the vulnerability.

    He added, bleakly that "we are not aware of an actual fix."

  • Monday Witness: It's Time to Reconize a Civil Right Not to be Connected
    Along with death and taxes, two things appear inevitable. The first is that Internet of Things devices will not only be built into everything we can imagine, but into everything we can't as well. The second is that IoT devices will have wholly inadequate security, if they have any security at all. Even with strong defenses, there is the likelihood that governmental agencies will gain covert access to IoT devices anyway. What this says to me is that we need a law that guarantees consumers the right to buy versions of products that are not wirelessly enabled at all.
  • Remember kids, if you're going to disclose, disclose responsibly!
    If you pay any attention to the security universe, you're aware that Tavis Ormandy is basically on fire right now with his security research. He found the Cloudflare data leak issue a few weeks back, and is currently going to town on LastPass. The LastPass crew seems to be dealing with this pretty well, I'm not seeing a lot of complaining, mostly just info and fixes which is the right way to do these things.

Lightroom and Darktable: the verdict two years after switching

In summer 2015, I posted a detailed account of my tentative switch from Windows7 and Lightroom to Linux and Darktable. This was sparked by sudden crashes that were afflicting my system, but in a deeper sense grew from frustration with Windows and, to a lesser degree, with Lightroom. Once I headed for Linux, I decided to plunge in fully and commit to using Ubuntu and free, open-source photo software for several months – at least until the end of that year. That would give me a chance to see whether I could actually run my photography business on the new system. Read more

7 Linux Mainstream Distros Alternatives

Linux Mainstream Distros are quite popular as they have a large number of developers working on them as well as a large number of users using them. In addition, these distros also have strong support system. People often search alternatives for Linux Mainstream Distros but often get confused about which is the best one for them. So listed below are 7 best Linux mainstream distros alternative choices for you. Read more