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Tuesday, 05 May 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 15.10's "W" Codename Being Revealed Soon Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 4:07pm
Story Accessibility in Linux is good (but could be much better) Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 4:03pm
Story Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 Pre2 Ships with KDE Apps 15.04, KDE Frameworks 5.9, and Xfce 4.12 Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 3:56pm
Story The Return of Korora MATE Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 3:52pm
Story ​Linux is an operating system for all ages Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 3:51pm
Story MakuluLinux 9 Xfce 64bit Released. Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 3:37pm
Story Five more operating systems for the Raspberry Pi 2 Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 9:16am
Story Leftovers: KDE and GNOME Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 8:50am
Story Announcing the Birth of Hurd Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 8:30am
Story Arch Linux – Kde Plasma 5.3 stable is finally available for installation Rianne Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 7:55am

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Kodi 15.0 Beta 1 Released

    The first beta of "Isengard", a.k.a. Kodi 15.0, is now available for testing.

    Kodi 15 isn't big on the feature front but is mostly aimed at cleaning up the code-base and delivering other underlying improvements to this popular open-source HTPC software formerly known as XBMC.

  • GNOME Developers Explain the Upcoming Features in Nautilus (Files)

    Carlos Soriano, one of the developers behind the well-known Nautilus (also known as Files) file manager application that is used by default in numerous Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, announced plans for the next major version of the software.

  • Calibre 2.27 eBook Converter Brings New Features

    Calibre is an eBook reader, converter, and editor, but these are just a few of the features of this great app. The developer has released a new update for the application and implemented a few new features and various fixes.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • SteamOS and Debian 8 Jesse

    Debian 8 Jesse has been released, and some folks have been wondering if Valve will update SteamOS to Debian 8. It's possible that Valve might do so, but it probably won't happen anytime soon.

  • Wine 1.7.42 Implements More Of Direct2D

    Wine 1.7.42 adds support for dynamic timezone information, initial desktop shell window support, support for more of DIrect2D, and various bug-fixes. In total there's 34 known bug-fixes with this latest Wine development release.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Tizen Expansion

Filed under
Development
Linux
  • Samsung's Tizen app aspirations go global as it expands to 182 countries

    Depending on the country you live in, you may not have seen or heard about Samsung's Tizen app store. That's about to change. The company -- which just regained the smartphone sales crown from Apple -- is expanding the Tizen store from two to 182 countries around the world.

  • Understanding Tizen Programming

    Tizen have been in development for several years now and we are proud to have products in the market place in the form of Smart watches, a Smart Phone, Smart TV and Smart Cameras. This is a great opportunity for application and game developers to explore a new ecosystem.

Using ARM chips and Linux, Barcelona center dreams of being 'Airbus of supercomputing'

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

In the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), big data isn't a new or revolutionary concept. The center, located on the campus of the Polytechnic University of Catalonia, has been managing huge volumes of data for companies from fields as diverse as energy and pharmaceuticals since 2005, helping them cut costs and boost returns.

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OpenBSD 5.7

Filed under
BSD

This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 5.7. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 5.7.

Improved hardware support, including:
New xhci(4) driver for USB 3.0 host controllers.
New umcs(4) driver for MosChip Semiconductor 78x0 USB multiport serial adapters.
New skgpio(4) driver for Soekris net6501 GPIO and LEDs.
New uslhcom(4) driver for Silicon Labs CP2110 USB HID based UART.
New nep(4) driver for Sun Neptune 10Gb Ethernet devices.
New iwm(4) driver for Intel 7260, 7265, and 3160 wifi cards.
The rtsx(4) driver now supports RTS5227 and RTL8411B card readers.
The bge(4) driver now supports jumbo frames on various additional BCM57xx chipsets.
The ciss(4) driver now supports HP Gen9 Smart Array/Smart HBA devices.
The mpi(4) and mfi(4) drivers now have mpsafe interrupt handlers running without the big lock.
The ppb(4) driver now supports PCI bridges that support subtractive decoding (fixes PCMCIA behind the ATI SB400 PCI bridge), and devices with 64-bit BARs behind PCI-PCI bridges as seen on SPARC T5-2 systems.

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Pico-ITX SBC runs Linux on Bay Trail, expands modularly

Filed under
Linux

Advantech has launched a Pico-ITX SBC that runs Linux on an Atom E3825 or Celeron J1900, and offers modular expansion and optional -40 to 85°C operation.

Like Advantech’s MIO-2262, which offered the old Atom N2000 “Cedarview” processors, the new MIO-2263 uses the company’s MI/O-Ultra modular expansion format, which it also refers to as MIOe. The MIOe expansion interface expands upon the coastline and onboard interfaces with additional I/O including PCIe and DisplayPort.

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Debian 8: Linux’s most reliable distro makes its biggest change since 1993

Filed under
Debian

Debian 8—nicknamed "Jessie" after the cowgirl character in Toy Story 2 and 3—debuted last week, but it feels overdue. The release was in development within the Testing channel for quite a while, and, if you recall, Debian Linux consists of three major development branches: Stable, Testing, and Unstable. In order for a new iteration of Debian to officially go public, work must progress through each stage (starting in Unstable, ending in Stable). But it wasn't until the official feature freeze for this release in November 2014 that the contents of Testing really became what you'll actually find in Debian 8 today.

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Seek Thermal - Android Infrared Camera Review

Filed under
Android
Reviews

The costs associated with thermal imaging systems have restricted their usage and kept it out of reach of the average consumer / impulse-buy territory. However, there have been some recent advancements in this field that have made the prices of such system more palatable to the non-professional users. Thanks to the advent of smart mobile devices, the costs associated with the storage, control and user-interface for these systems could be taken out for most markets. One of the first forays into this space was the $250 FLIR ONE personal thermal imager from FLIR Systems. Unfortunately, by restricting the hardware design to work only with the Apple iPhone 5 and 5s, they lost out on widespread market appeal. Seek Thermal entered the market with a splash by launching their first smartphone-attached infrared camera for just $199. Two distinct models carrying the same features and capabilities were launched, only differing in the connector - one with a microUSB interface for Android devices and another with a Lightning connector for iOS devices. Before talking in detail about the Android version of the camera and the associated mobile app, let us take a moment to understand how thermal imaging works - particularly since this is not something we have covered on our site before.

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6 Ways to Futureproof Your Linux Infrastructure

Filed under
Linux

Future-proofing isn't just about investing in the latest hardware and buying into the latest technology to keep your IT team happy. There are sound business reasons to do it and sensible, cost effective strategies.

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ARM widens the appeal of its IoT OS with mbed client that runs on Linux

Filed under
Linux

The race for the hearts and minds of IoT developers is in full swing and ARM has been positioning itself as the defacto standard for IoT devices. Based on its hardware alone that isn’t an unreasonable proposition, but to sweeten the deal ARM has been working hard on its software offering.

Read more

Canonical unveils AMD-based HP Ubuntu laptops for XP laggards

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has partnered with AMD, HP and Ebuyer.com to launch three Ubuntu laptops designed for business buyers.

The £200 HP Probook 255, £250 Probook 355 and £300 ProBook 455 will be made available for pre-order on Ebuyer.com at the end of May.

Read more

Also: HP has another go at low-cost Linux laptops

Is Xfce Still a Lightweight Distribution?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In February 2015, Xfce 4.12 was released. The first Xfce release in nearly three years, it was greeted with enthusiasm. Yet at the same time, a few users questioned whether the new version was as light on memory as earlier releases.

It's a good question -- and by that comment, I mean, as people usually do, that it has no clear answer. Some indicators suggest that Xfce remains as efficient as ever, while others suggest Xfce is not much different from other popular desktop environments, such as KDE.

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LibreOffice Numbers & Names

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice started with the 3.3 release; it then added micro releases with a third number next to the first two digits. As time went forward, so did the releases: 3.4.0, 3.4.1, 3.5.0, 3.5.1, onwards to the 3.6 branch, the last one to carry the number 3 as its major release number, and to the 4.0 and the 4.x.x based releases. This summer we will be releasing the 5.0, and you will hear a lot more about the changes and improvements that are being put into it. But when you think about it, we started our version numbering exactly based on the one of OpenOffice.org . In 2010, it meant something technically and something for the community and more broadly the users of OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice. Fast forward to 2015: does anybody really know what a “4.3” release mean? What message does this numbering scheme convey?

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When Official Debian Support Ends, Who Will Save You?

With a new version of Debian recently released, it's an exciting time for users who long for newer applications and cutting-edge features. But for some users, the new release is a cause for concern. A new release means their current installation is reaching the end of its lifecycle, and for one reason or another, they can't make the switch. And, this leaves them at risk from a variety of security risks and crippling bugs, but there is hope in the shape of an independent project.

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Apache SpamAssassin 3.4.1 released

Filed under
Server
OSS
Security

On behalf of the project, I am pleased to announce the release of Apache SpamAssassin v3.4.1.

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New Debian leader wants to improve communications

Filed under
Debian

Back in 2013, Lucas Nussbaum was hardly a month old in the job when Wheezy was released. And this month, Neil McGovern took over on 17 April and saw version 8.0, otherwise known as Jessie, released eight days later.

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Btrfs RAID Testing Begins With Linux 4.0

Filed under
Linux

This time around I'm doing the Btrfs RAID benchmarks on four traditional HDDs (though separately also been working on Linux RAID tests on a 6 SAS drive server). For this testing I picked up for WD Green 1TB 3.5-inch, SATA 6Gb/s, 64MB Cache WD10EZRX drives. At Amazon they cost only $52 USD a piece and should be interesting to test in a four-disk RAID array.

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