Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 22 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla: Developer Roadshow (Asia Tour), CRLite, Async Interview Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 4:18am
Story ODF 1.3 approved as OASIS Committee Specification Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 4:11am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 4:01am
Story Venturing out Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 3:50am
Story Games: Planetary Sanitations Inc., Terminal Phase, The Humble Europa Universalis IV Bundle and Half-Life Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 3:38am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 3:19am
Story PinePhone ‘Brave Heart’ Starts Shipping, Here’s What to Expect Roy Schestowitz 14 22/01/2020 - 2:46am
Story AMD Zen 3 and Linux Roy Schestowitz 7 22/01/2020 - 2:13am
Story All new Chromebooks will get at least 8 years of automatic updates Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 2:09am
Story today's leftovers and howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 6:33pm

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Improving python code performance by using lru_cache decorator

    Here is the program to generate the Fibonacci series up to the number provided as a command-line argument.

  • Wing Python IDE 7.2 - January 20, 2020

    Wing 7.2 adds auto-formatting with Black and YAPF, expanded support for virtualenv, support for Anaconda environments, easier debugging of modules launched with python -m, simplified manually configured remote debugging, and other improvements.

  • Python Meeting Düsseldorf - 2020-01-22

    The following text is in German, since we're announcing a regional user group meeting in Düsseldorf, Germany.

  • Having some fun with Python

    If it’s not clear after the inevitable Swedish-chef-muppet impression has run through your mind, this string-formatting operation will replace the contents of port with a string containing two copies of whatever was in port, separated by a colon. So if port was "foo", now it will be "foo:foo".

  • Using SciPy for Optimization

    When you want to do scientific work in Python, the first library you can turn to is SciPy. As you’ll see in this tutorial, SciPy is not just a library, but a whole ecosystem of libraries that work together to help you accomplish complicated scientific tasks quickly and reliably.

Syncthing: Open Source P2P File Syncing Tool

Filed under
Software
Gadgets

Syncthing is an open-source peer-to-peer file synchronization tool that you can use for syncing files between multiple devices (including an Android phone).

Usually, we have a cloud sync solution like MEGA or Dropbox to have a backup of our files on the cloud while making it easier to share it.

But, what do you do if you want to sync your files across multiple devices without storing them on the cloud?

That is where Syncthing comes to the rescue.

Read more

Debian Policy Updated Following Recent Systemd "Init System Diversity" Vote

Filed under
Debian

Following last month's Debian init system diversity vote where the Debian developers decided on a general resolution of focusing on systemd but support exploring alternatives, the official Debian Policy has been updated to reflect that.

Debian Policy 4.5 is the new version that incorporates guidance following that general resolution.

The Debian Policy manual now states that packages with system services should include systemd service units, init scripts are encouraged if there is no systemd unit but optional otherwise, init scripts are encouraged to support the "status" argument, and use of update-rc.d is required if the package includes an init script.

Read more

If George Orwell was alive today, would he be an Internet troll?

Filed under
OSS

In 2017, a German organisation, FSFE e.V, elected me as their community representative. They had this odd approach to membership, approximately 28 people had been registered as members of the assocation. Their 1500 volunteers and donors were invited to join but kept off the books. As the organization's contempt for membership became apparent, I started to feel Orwell's animals coming to life. As he wrote all those years ago, All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others. In FSFE's case, we could say all Fellows are equal but some Fellows are more equal than others.

[...]

Animal Farm is only one side of the Orwellian coin, the other being his uncannily accurate tour-de-force of the modern surveillance state, Nineteen-Eighty-Four. All of the organizations mentioned above (Debian, FSFE) are secretly funded by Google. Would you be less surprised to find a bible in a church than to find Nineteen-Eighty-Four under the pillows of Google's founders? One of the most startling discoveries during my time as community representative was the extent to which all of these organizations had built their budgets around recurring annual contributions from Google. Their experiments in demotions arose at exactly the same time that women in Google's workforce who spoke up against harassment found themselves being publicly demoted and humiliated. It was revealed that one of the organizations, Debian, had secretly banked $300,000 from Google under the radar at the same time that attention was on an identical-sized donation from a non-profit, the Handshake Foundation. What a convenient cover. After Linux Foundation and FSFE had decided to eliminate their annual elections, Google's money had a community representative "demoted" to a lower status in Debian just days before the call for nominations in leadership elections.

Read more

Games: Chromebooks, Lucky Lanterns in Rocket League, Crumble

Filed under
Gaming
  • Thanks to Linux, Google and Valve are Bringing Steam to Chromebooks

    In yet another win for desktop Linux, Google and Steam are about to up the chromebook gaming field.

    On many supported chromebooks, it is already possible to run Linux applications on the chromebook. For certain user types, this has been a real boon. However, for gamers, not so much. That is about to change, thanks to a joint effort by Google and Valve.

    According to Kan Liu, Director of Product Management for Google Chrome OS, Steam is coming to chromebooks. What is Steam? Steam is a digital video game distribution service, offered by Valve, originally released in 2003 as a means for Valve to provide automatic updates for their own line of games. Eventually the service was expanded to include third-party publishers and is now one of the largest digital distribution systems for games.

  • Lucky Lanterns event is now live in Rocket League and there's a brand new arena

    Psyonix have put the Lucky Lanterns event live now in Rocket League. No update is needed today, as one went out a few days ago to prepare for it.

    Working just like previous events, giving you a special currency for playing which you can then redeem for special customization items. This time around though, there's no special game mode to play. Instead, there's an entirely new arena called The Forbidden Temple Arena.

  • Amusing sticky-tongue physics platformer 'Crumble' has a big demo update, now with multiplayer

    A rolling-ball physics platformer where you move like slime, jump like a bouncy ball and swing using a sticky tongue like a weird version of Spider Man. Crumble has a lot of fun ideas going for it and a big demo update is out now with co-op.

    Covered a few times here now, as I've absolutely loved following the progress on this one. The developer posts a lot of upcoming bits for it on Twitter, and it looks like they have some pretty amusing plans for Crumble. Including a portal that turns you into a shadow that completely warps the gameplay.

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: MX Linux, Linux Headlines, Going Linux, File Systems and Linux Action News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • VIDEO: MX Linux 19 Features and Desktop Tour

    MX Linux is a Linux distribution based on Debian stable and using core antiX components. The distributions MX Tools is very popular among users and combined with other several ready-to-use tools, it is great for users who prefer to tweak their distro to their liking. In this video, we will take you through the features tour showing casing MX Linux 19.

  • 2020-01-20 | Linux Headlines

    Nextcloud follows up with good news for mobile users, breaking a Kubernetes install on purpose, and the amicable resolution for recent concerns in the Rust community.

  • Going Linux #384 · 2019 Year In Review

    In our annual review of the previous year we discuss Larry's books on Ubuntu MATE, Microsoft's transformation into an open source company, the distros we've tried, and predictions for 2020. We read a couple of emails from listeners and recommend podcasts and Linux applications.

  • File Systems | Which One is the Best? ZFS, BTRFS, or EXT4

    Let's go over File Systems in this video. We will determine which one is the best ZFS, BTRFS, and EXT4. Each one might work for you based on YOUR needs!

  • Linux Action News 141

    Nextcloud's new release is so big it gets a rebrand, why Mozilla had a round of lay-offs, and the real possibility of Steam coming to Chrome OS.

    Plus, the sad loss of a community member, and more.

Comparison: Snap vs Flatpack vs AppImage

Filed under
Software

New packaging formats like Snap, Flatpak and AppImage are providing distribution agnostic packages that work on most Linux distributions. This solves packaging problems faced by app developers who want to distribute their apps on multiple Linux distributions. Now they can focus on one build that works everywhere instead of going through different packaging standards.
This article will list the main differences between these three packaging formats from end users’ perspective. Differences in packaging architecture and ease of packaging from developers’ point of view won’t be covered here.

The table below summarizes the main differences between Snap, Flatpak and AppImage file formats. Most of them are self-explanatory, other points have been explained below the comparison table.

Read more

GParted 1.1 Open-Source Partition Editor Is Out with Various Enhancements, Fixes

Filed under
OSS

Curtis Gedak released Gparted 1.1.0, a maintenance update aiming to include enhancements, bug fixes, as well as translation updates. Highlights include the adoption of faster minfo and mdir to read FAT16 and FAT32 usage, and the ability to calculate the size of JFS partitions more accurately.

Moreover, this release adds support for recognizing ATARAID members, as well as to detect their busy status, and improves the moving of locked LUKS-encrypted partition. The xvfb-run dependency has been added and it's required for the "make check" and "make distcheck" commands during compilation.
Read more

Firefox 72.0.2 Improves Playback Performance for Full-Screen 1080p Videos

Filed under
Moz/FF

Coming almost two weeks after the Firefox 72.0.1 point release, which was an important security update addressing a zero-day vulnerability, the Firefox 72.0.2 update is a maintenance release that fixes various issues, such as the inconsistent playback performance for full-screen 1080p videos on certain systems.

Firefox 72.0.2 also addresses a web compatibility issue with CSS Shadow Parts, which shipped as part of the Firefox 72 release, a hang that occurred when opening about:logins when a master password is set, issues reported by users when attempting to open files containing spaces in their path, as well as various stability issues.

Read more

XanMod-ing Ubuntu To Perform Closer To Intel's Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this month many Phoronix readers were interested in our fresh tests of the XanMod-patched Linux kernel for boosting the desktop and workstation performance compared to Ubuntu's default Linux kernel. Among many patches, XanMod does pull in some kernel patches from Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux, so we figured it would be interesting to see how the XanMod'ed Ubuntu compares to Clear Linux performance.

As covered more in the earlier article, the XanMod Linux kernel flavor makes use of the BFQ I/O scheduler, offers CPU scaling governor improvements, makes use of preemptive full tickless kernel settings, and has a variety of other patches from leveraging Clear Linux optimizations to the BMQ process scheduler to the Proton FSYNC patches to much more. This round of testing was using a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS with its current Linux 5.4 default kernel and then re-tested using the same Ubuntu 20.04 LTS installation but running on the 4.1.10-xanmod6 kernel at the time. Additionally, the same CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS as Clear Linux defaults to were also utilized.
Read more

User Guide to Pantheon Desktop of elementary OS

Filed under
OS
HowTos

Unlike Windows, user interface in elementary OS has a name, and it is Pantheon Desktop. It is a beautifully designed and easy to use desktop environment. This article wants to be a user guide to Pantheon Desktop that is simple to read and practice. You will learn about basic concepts of Pantheon and then practice to use it for daily tasks. You will see here how to use Wingpanel (top panel), Slingshot (start menu), Plank (taskbar), Switchboard (system settings), plus understand Headerbars and Multitasking mode. Of course I also include frequently used Keyboard Shortcuts so you can work more quickly. For your information, I use elementary OS 5.0 Juno as basis of this tutorial. I hope everybody could take benefit from this article and next time I could refer here if I write again about elementary. Enjoy!

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (git, java-11-openjdk, and thunderbird), Debian (cacti, chromium, gpac, kernel, openjdk-11, ruby-excon, and thunderbird), Fedora (chromium and rubygem-rack), Mageia (suricata, tigervnc, and wireshark), openSUSE (glusterfs, libredwg, and uftpd), and Ubuntu (linux-hwe and sysstat).

  • Amazon’s Ring blamed hacks on consumers reusing their passwords. A lawsuit says that’s not true.

    After a series of high-profile incidents in which hackers gained access to live footage of Ring security cameras inside people?s homes, the company blamed consumers for reusing old passwords. Two plaintiffs in a class action lawsuit accusing the company of negligence and invasion of privacy say that?s not the issue ? instead, they say their passwords were unique and that the company didn?t implement basic security measures to protect users. A security expert enlisted by Recode found that Ring?s devices lack widely adopted safety precautions.

  • KeePassXC 2.5.3 Released with Microsoft Edge Integration

    KeePassXC password manager 2.5.3 was released today with stability improvements and new feature: browser extension for Chromium-based Edge browser.

Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Deploy Jenkins Pipelines in OpenShift 4 with OpenShift Container Storage 4

    Jenkins is one of the most important development infrastructure components, but can we make Jenkins pipelines run faster? Using OpenShift Container Storage we can speed up the build time of applications by using persistent storage to save the stateful data of dependencies and libraries, for example, that are needed during compilation.

  • IBM Ceases Work on Server-Side Swift Development

    Swift was originally developed by Apple in 2010 to make it easier for developers to build mobile applications. However, multiple groups, including IBM, have been working to extend Swift for server-side applications, participating in the Swift server workgroup. IBM has also been one of the primary contributors behind the Kitura server-side Swift framework. In late December, after almost four years of development effort, IBM decided to discontinue its server-side Swift efforts.

  • Google offers IBM AS/400 apps new home in its cloud

    Enterprises looking for a way to modernize legacy AS/400 workloads now have a new option: Move them onto Google Cloud Platform.

    Google won’t host your old AS/400 for you, but it is renting time on IBM Power Systems servers, the AS/400’s architectural successors. Its announcement follows a similar one from Microsoft in September.

    [...]

    Its software now runs on IBM i but “it goes back to the heritage of System i and iSeries, and way back to the AS/400 days,” says VAI’s CIO Kevin Beasley. “Now Google hosts IBM i, IBM hosts it, Microsoft hosts it. … Back when we started there weren't many places that you could actually find IBM i hosted.”

    Thousands of other companies are still running systems built on the old AS/400 architecture, according to all400s.com, a website that tracks job offerings for IT workers with AS/400 skills, prompting the cloud giants to look for ways to serve these businesses.

  • Google Cloud to support IBM Power Systems

    Enterprises looking for a way to modernise legacy AS/400 workloads now have a new option: Move them onto Google Cloud Platform.

    Google will not host your old AS/400 for you, but it is renting time on IBM Power Systems servers, the AS/400’s architectural successors. Its announcement follows a similar one from Microsoft in September.

    At the same time, Google is introducing a Premium Support plan to maintain high-availability services, making the GCP more attractive to CIOs averse to down-time.

Security: Microsoft, TPM and Open Telnet Ports

Filed under
Security
  • It's Friday, the weekend has landed... and Microsoft warns of an Internet Explorer zero day exploited in the wild

    Still using Internet Explorer? Don't. There's another zero-day
    Microsoft let slip on Friday an advisory detailing an under-attack zero-day vulnerability (CVE-2020-0674) for Internet Explorer. The scripting engine flaw can be exploited to gain remote code execution on a vulnerable machine by way of a specially crafted webpage. The flaw can be mitigated by restricting access to the JavaScript component JScript.dll, and thus far there is no patch available.

    "Microsoft is aware of this vulnerability and working on a fix," the software giant noted.

  • Verifying your system state in a secure and private way

    This is solved using a procedure called Remote Attestation. The TPM can be asked to provide a digital signature of the PCR values, and this can be passed to a remote system along with the event log. That remote system can then examine the event log, make sure it corresponds to the signed PCR values and make a security decision based on the contents of the event log rather than just on the final PCR values. This makes the system significantly more flexible and aids diagnostics. Unfortunately, it also means you need a remote server and an internet connection and then some way for that remote server to tell you whether it thinks your system is trustworthy and also you need some way to believe that the remote server is trustworthy and all of this is well not ideal if you're not an enterprise.

    Last week I gave a talk at linux.conf.au on one way around this. Basically, remote attestation places no constraints on the network protocol in use - while the implementations that exist all do this over IP, there's no requirement for them to do so. So I wrote an implementation that runs over Bluetooth, in theory allowing you to use your phone to serve as the remote agent. If you trust your phone, you can use it as a tool for determining if you should trust your laptop.

  • Telnet credentials of 515,000 routers, servers & IoT devices dumped on hacker forum

    A hacker has reportedly dumped Telnet credentials associated with more than 515,000 home routers, servers, and Internet-connected devices on a popular hacker forum.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GameMode 1.5

  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release. GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works? To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care. Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects. In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries. In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments. One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.