Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Solus Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.24 LTS, New Repo Sync Tool Coming Soon Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 2:52am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 2:28am
Story GStreamer 1.12.0 release candidate 2 (1.11.91) Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 2:15am
Story Debian 9.0 "Stretch" Might Not Have UEFI Secure Boot Support Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 2:13am
Story Development News: Rust 1.17 and SourceForge Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 2:09am
Story Nouveau Re-Clocked With DRM-Next Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev vs. NVIDIA 381 Driver Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:58am
Story Coverage From Recent Linux Conferences Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:56am
Story Supply Chain Case Study: Canonical and Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:54am
Story Linux's Big Bang: One Kernel, Countless Distros Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:45am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:41am

Solus Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.24 LTS, New Repo Sync Tool Coming Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It's been more than a week since Solus Project launched the new Solus ISO snapshot, along with the first release of the Solus GNOME Edition, and Joshua Strobl is back with another installation of the This Week In Solus (TWiS) newsletter.

This Week In Solus Install 43 delivers both good and bad news to Solus users. We'll start with the good news, as the distribution is now powered by the Linux 4.9.24 LTS kernel, and the ypkg build tool was updated to version 21, a maintenance release that adds a few improvements. The solbuild build system has been updated as well, and it's now compatible with the latest libgit2 library.

Read more

GStreamer 1.12.0 release candidate 2 (1.11.91)

Filed under
GNOME

Debian 9.0 "Stretch" Might Not Have UEFI Secure Boot Support

Filed under
Debian

Debian 9.0 "Stretch" has seen UEFI Secure Boot support no longer being considered a release blocker but is now just a stretch goal for this upcoming release.

Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire shared that while Secure Boot support was planned for Debian 9.0, it might not happen now due to short on time and resources. Secure Boot might still work its way though into a later Debian 9.x update.

Read more

Development News: Rust 1.17 and SourceForge

Filed under
Development
  • Announcing Rust 1.17

    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.17.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • Rust 1.17 Released

    Judging by the massive Rust fan base in our forums, those of you reading this will be delighted today about the newest version of Rustlang, v1.17.

  • SourceForge: Let's hold hands in a post-CodePlex world [Ed: Microsoft Gavin needlessly interjects Microsoft into it. Like CodePlex was EVER relevant…]

    President Logan Abbott has said he’ll seek tighter integration between SourceForge’s tools and those of others – including giant rival GitHub.

Nouveau Re-Clocked With DRM-Next Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev vs. NVIDIA 381 Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

A few days back I posted benchmarks of the initial GTX 1050/1060/1070/1080 Nouveau 3D support. As expected, the performance was rather abysmal with re-clocking not being available for Pascal (or Maxwell) GPUs on this open-source NVIDIA Linux kernel driver. For those trying to use Nouveau for Linux games or care about your GPU clock speeds, currently the GTX 600/700 "Kepler" series is still your best bet or the GTX 750 "Maxwell 1" is the last NVIDIA graphics processors not requiring signed firmware images and can properly -- but manually -- re-clock with the current Nouveau driver.

Read more

Coverage From Recent Linux Conferences

Filed under
Linux

Supply Chain Case Study: Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I love talking about supply chain management in an open source software context, especially as it applies to managing collaborative processes between upstream projects and their downstream products. In the article linked above, I called out a couple of examples of supply chain management: an enterprise OpenStack distribution and a container management product utilizing Kubernetes and Docker for upstream platforms.

What about anti-patterns or things to avoid? There are several we could call out. At the risk of picking on someone I like, I’ll choose Canonical simply because they’ve been in the headlines recently for changes they’ve made to their organization, cutting back on some efforts and laying off some people. As I look at Canonical from a product offering perspective, there’s a lot they got right, which others could benefit from. But they also made many mistakes, some of which could have been avoided. First, the good.

Read more

Linux's Big Bang: One Kernel, Countless Distros

Filed under
Linux

Even if you're a newcomer to Linux, you've probably figured out that it is not a single, monolithic operating system, but a constellation of projects. The different "stars" in this constellation take the form of "distributions," or "distros." Each offers its own take on the Linux model.

To gain an appreciation of the plethora of options offered by the range of distributions, it helps to understand how Linux started out and subsequently proliferated. With that in mind, here's a brief introduction to Linux's history.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

GNOME Development

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.25.1 Released

    The first development snapshots of GNOME Shell and Mutter in the 3.25 series were released today in preparation for this week's GNOME 3.25.1 milestone.

    Mutter 3.25.1 contains a number of improvements, mostly around its low-level monitor and display code. Some of the 3.25.1 work includes syncing window geometry on state changes, using EGL rather than GLX on OpenGL ES drawing, fixed HiDPI detection for vertical monitor layouts, scaling relative motion deltas with the monitor scale, a rework of low-level monitor configuration, and other fixes.

  • GNOME development release for Shell & Mutter 3.25.1 is now out, stable 3.26 due in September

    The first development release of what will become GNOME 3.26 has released today for Shell and Mutter.

    For Mutter, the window manager for GNOME, this development release changes: fixed HiDPI detection on vertical monitors, fixes a lock-up when using additional theme variants and they also did a rework of low-level monitor configuration and more.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux Kernel 4.10.10, Updated Fonts, and More

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio reports today, April 27, 2017, on the updates and improvements that landed in the software repositories during this week, brought by a total of four snapshots.

Read more

Linux 4.10.13

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.13 kernel.

All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.64

Linux 4.9.25

Linux-on-Sitara embedded computer triplets offer mini-PCIe expansion

Filed under
Linux

VS Vision Systems has launched a trio of embedded systems that run Debian or OpenWrt on a TI AM3352. and offer mini-PCIe wireless options and optional VPN.

VS Vision Systems GmbH has tapped the tried-but-true, low-power Texas Instruments Sitara AM3352 SoC for its new line of fanless, Linux-driven Baltos iR embedded computers. The 154 × 104 × 50mm Baltos iR 5221 has two more Fast Ethernet ports than the Baltos iR 3220, and adds a USB 2.0 OTG port and CANBus port, but is otherwise identical. The 115 × 73 × 25mm Baltos iR 2110 is a more stripped down version that lacks the other devices’ mini-PCIe and SIM card slots, among other features. The systems are said to support remote monitoring and control applications, as well as general embedded computing.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space

    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved.

    In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."

  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson

    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September.

    Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.

  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages

    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts.

    Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.

  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04

    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop.

    I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.

  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)

    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine.

    It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.

  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers

    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed.

    The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.

FOSS Licensing (and Lack Thereof)

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Portugal to harmonise usability of govt portals

    All of the code, information and tools are made available for reuse.

  • JRC: ‘Releasing code without a licence hinders reuse’

    Projects that publish source code without a licence weaken the reusability of their code, warns Stefano Gentile, a copyright and trademark specialist working for the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC). Currently just 20 % of all projects published on GitHub, one of the most popular source code sharing platforms, have selected a licence for their work - down from about 60% in 2008, Gentile said, quoting numbers published in 2015 by GitHub.

  • React to React

    The Additional Grant of Patent Rights is a patent license grant that includes certain termination criteria. These termination criteria are not entirely unprecedented when you look at the history of patent license provisions in OSI-approved licenses, but they are certainly broader than the termination criteria [or the equivalent] in several familiar modern licenses (the Apache License 2.0, EPL, MPL 2.0, and GPLv3).

  • BetConstruct declares the source code for its front-end as open source

    The project is distributed under MIT license.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Debian 9.0 "Stretch" Might Not Have UEFI Secure Boot Support

Debian 9.0 "Stretch" has seen UEFI Secure Boot support no longer being considered a release blocker but is now just a stretch goal for this upcoming release. Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire shared that while Secure Boot support was planned for Debian 9.0, it might not happen now due to short on time and resources. Secure Boot might still work its way though into a later Debian 9.x update. Read more

Development News: Rust 1.17 and SourceForge

  • Announcing Rust 1.17
    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.17.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.
  • Rust 1.17 Released
    Judging by the massive Rust fan base in our forums, those of you reading this will be delighted today about the newest version of Rustlang, v1.17.
  • SourceForge: Let's hold hands in a post-CodePlex world [Ed: Microsoft Gavin needlessly interjects Microsoft into it. Like CodePlex was EVER relevant…]
    President Logan Abbott has said he’ll seek tighter integration between SourceForge’s tools and those of others – including giant rival GitHub.

Nouveau Re-Clocked With DRM-Next Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev vs. NVIDIA 381 Driver

A few days back I posted benchmarks of the initial GTX 1050/1060/1070/1080 Nouveau 3D support. As expected, the performance was rather abysmal with re-clocking not being available for Pascal (or Maxwell) GPUs on this open-source NVIDIA Linux kernel driver. For those trying to use Nouveau for Linux games or care about your GPU clock speeds, currently the GTX 600/700 "Kepler" series is still your best bet or the GTX 750 "Maxwell 1" is the last NVIDIA graphics processors not requiring signed firmware images and can properly -- but manually -- re-clock with the current Nouveau driver. Read more

Coverage From Recent Linux Conferences