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Tuesday, 18 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The world’s biggest curl installations

Filed under
OSS
Web

curl is quite literally used everywhere. It is used by a huge number of applications and devices. But which applications, devices and users are the ones with the largest number of curl installations? I've tried to come up with a list...

I truly believe curl is one of the world's most widely used open source projects.

If you have comments, other suggestions or insights to help me polish this table or the numbers I present, please let me know!

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

The Current Linux Performance With 16 ARM Boards

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I provided a fresh look at the latest Linux performance on 22 Intel/AMD systems while for kicking off the benchmarking this week is a look at the current Linux performance on sixteen different ARM single board computers / developer boards from low-end to high-end.

For those curious about the current ARM Linux performance or wanting to compare your own x86/ARM/POWER/MIPS performance to these 16 ARM boards, here are some fresh benchmarks using the latest ARM Linux image releases for these different boards under test. Without going into too old of ARM platforms and based upon what I had available, the sixteen ARM boards for this comparison were...

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Apache SpamAssassin 3.4.2 released

Filed under
Security

On behalf of the Apache SpamAssassin Project Management Committee, I am
very pleased to announce the release of Apache SpamAssassin v3.4.2.
This release contains security bug fixes. A security announcement will
follow within the next 24 hours.

Apache SpamAssassin can be downloaded from
https://spamassassin.apache.org/downloads.cgi and via cpan
(Mail::SpamAssassin).

Our project website is https://spamassassin.apache.org/

Our DOAP is available at https://spamassassin.apache.org/doap.rdf

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International Day Against DRM takes action for a Day Without DRM on September 18th

Filed under
GNU

DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media. DRM creates a damaged good: it prevents you from doing what would be possible without it. This concentrates control over production and distribution of media, giving DRM peddlers the power to carry out massive digital book-burnings and conduct large-scale surveillance over people's media viewing habits.

Organized by the Defective by Design team, IDAD has occurred annually since 2006. Each year, participants take action through protests, rallies, and the sharing of DRM-free media and materials. Participating nonprofits, activist groups, and companies from around the world include the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Open Rights Group, Public Knowledge, the Document Foundation, and others (for a complete list, see: https://dayagainstdrm.org). These groups will share the message by writing about why DRM is harmful, organizing events, and offering discounts on DRM-free media.

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Bulgaria prepares to build its own central code repository

Filed under
Development
OSS

In November, Bulgaria’s state eGovernment agency SEGA (Държавната агенция „Електронно управление“ ДАЕУ) will award a contract for building the country’s open source code repository. SEGA began studying submitted proposals this Tuesday. The repository, to be based on Git, will be hosting source all software newly developed by or for Bulgaria’s public services.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • An "obsessive," "anti-imperialist" Turing Complete computer language with only one command

    Daniel writes, "An obsessive programmer, frustrated with not only the inefficiencies of mainstream OSes like Windows, but what he sees as their 'imperialistic oppression,' built an entire operating system using a subleq architecture. Subleq is a OISC, a language with only a single command. It lacks the most basic features of programming languages, and yet is Turing Complete.

  • PHP 7.3-RC1 Released, Benchmarks Looking Good For This Next PHP7 Update

    Released this week was the first RC milestone for the PHP 7.3 feature update due out before year's end. This weekend I ran some fresh PHP benchmarks looking at its performance.

    The PHP 7.3 release candidate is made up of many fixes ranging from memory corruption and segmentation faults to undefined symbols and other problems. The list of changes can be found via the NEWS entry.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: GIMP 2.10

    GIMP 2.10 landed in Debian Testing a few weeks ago and I have to say I'm very happy about it. The last major version of GIMP (2.8) was released in 2012 and the new version fixes a lot of bugs and improved the user interface.

  • Political strategy game Democracy 4 announced with Linux support

    Positech Games have announced Democracy 4 [Official Site], the next evolution of their political strategy game and it's coming with Linux support. For those who think they can run a country or would like to have a go at it, this is probably the closest you will ever get.

    This is good to see, because we had Democracy 3 that supported Linux, but Democracy 3 Africa did not support Linux. A shame too, because I rather liked what I saw in Democracy 3 which is why I'm quite happy about this news.

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • 7 Top free & open source web hosting control panel (Cpanel)

    Setting up a website is not an easy task especially when you have to maintain multiple websites including databases and other files. Its become more hectic, when you go for VPS servers or Cloud hosting those are not more than a just bare server machine with some Linux operating system such as CentOS or Ubuntu. Those are website developers or familiar to how to up and run a website on Linux server definitely looking for some kind of free & open source tools to manage a website’s hosting backend.

    To solve such situations we have web hosting control panels or admin panels software those comes really handy and helps to get rid of the command interface for setting up each and everything.

  • Gavi's Song sheet music with TuxGuitar and LilyPond

    A year or two ago I bought Lindsey Stirling’s Album Brave Enough. It’s wonderful all around, but I really fell in love with Gavi’s Song.

    Three weeks ago I took a stab at playing this on my guitar. It’s technically not actually that difficult – After listening to the original and trying to repeat it for several days, I can now actually play through it without too many hiccups (still far from being YouTube’able, though). At least the first two thirds – but what I have is enough to get the feeling across, and it has a proper ending.

  • How to Increase File Upload Size in PHP
  • Simple guide to install PostGreSQL on Ubuntu
  • Combating article theft by delaying RSS feeds

KDE: KDE Repository Proposal, Belated Akademy Coverage, and Krita Interview With Alyssa May

Filed under
KDE
  • Proposal: .editorconfig files in every KDE Repository

    There’s some discussion on D15383 about the use of editorconfig in our sources, I belive that we should have this little file in *all* of our projects (actually I would put this in *every single project that exists*. This is a small file that handles common code conventions per project, for instance the tab vs spaces thing.

  • KDE Akademy 2018

    Yeah I am not in the picture, but I was there! You can find me over on the left there, where several of us were cut off Akademy was held in the lovely city of Vienna, Austria this year. Hats off to the akademy team for a great job!

    This year at akademy I spent much of my time catching up with the Blue Systems team and meeting with the KDE Sysadmin team. I am happy to report Ben Cooksley is real! Due to my flights, I missed the first and last day. It was still a productive akademy. I attended some good sysadmin and KDE Neon BoFs . I also did a bit of volunteering

    Even though I am mostly packaging for Debian directly these days, KDE Neon is still near and dear to my heart. I hope to be able to merge debian packaging into Neon soon so that we can have better collaboration within the team.

    I met with Ben in regards to getting back into sysadmin/CI work. I am working on Appimage tooling for KDE Binary factory to begin. I hope to utilize the craft tooling to make everyone’s lives easier. This of course is on my free time, but do keep an eye out!

  • Krita Interview with Alyssa May

Linux Accessibility For The Visually Impaired – For The Record

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Linux Accessibility For The Visually Impaired. I received a comment from Milton asking me about text to speech options in Linux. He also wanted to know what I recommended for audio dictation under Linux. The first option is indeed, using FoSS awesomeness. However the later relies on Google’s Web Speech API. Also, here is that article on controlling your mouse cursor with your webcam and no hands.

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4 scanning tools for the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

While the paperless world isn't here quite yet, more and more people are getting rid of paper by scanning documents and photos. Having a scanner isn't enough to do the deed, though. You need software to drive that scanner.

But the catch is many scanner makers don't have Linux versions of the software they bundle with their devices. For the most part, that doesn't matter. Why? Because there are good scanning applications available for the Linux desktop. They work with a variety of scanners and do a good job.

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Openwashing and EEE, or 'Open' but Actually Proprietary

Filed under
OSS
  • Initial Flatpak support arrives for Windows Subsystem for Linux
  • Aussie banks dragged into the 'open source' era via GitHub

    The open banking Data Standards Body, which is being run by the CSIRO's Data61 unit, is using the online service to manage feedback and comments for the technical standards that will govern the movement of data in the new economy. All decision proposals and final decisions for the open banking standards will be published on GitHub.

  • eBay Replatforming to Kubernetes, Envoy and Kafka: Intending to Open Source Hardware and Software

    eBay have discussed how they are conducting a replatforming initiative across their entire technology stack, which includes building and releasing as open source both the new hardware and software created. Open source is "fueling the transformation" of eBay's infrastructure, and they intend to use cloud native technologies like Kubernetes, Envoy, MongoDB, Docker and Apache Kafka.

    As part of a three-year effort to replatform and modernise their backend infrastructure, eBay has recently announced that they are building their own custom-designed servers "built by eBay, for eBay". The plan also includes making eBay's servers available to the public via open source in the fourth quarter of this year. Although many large scale technical organisations and cloud vendors custom build their own hardware, including Google, AWS and Azure, they do not typically release this as open source. eBay have stated that they "are using servers and hardware that we designed, reducing our dependence on third parties".

Torvalds Apologizes for His ‘Bad Behavior’, Takes a Break from Linux

Filed under
News

No more F-words and angry outbursts from Torvalds anymore? Linux creator Linus Torvalds is taking a break from Linux kernel development in order to take professional help for improving his behavior.
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Security: Windows/NSA Back Doors, Election Cracking, and Open Source Security Podcast

Filed under
Security
  • Cryptocurrency mining attacks using leaked NSA hacking tools are still highly active a year later

    Yet, more than a year since Microsoft released patches that slammed the backdoor shut, almost a million computers and networks are still unpatched and vulnerable to attack.

  • Leaked NSA exploits are still used to infect at least 919K servers with cryptojacking malware [Ed: Microsoft gave the NSA back doors. It was inevitable that crackers who do not work for the US government would get in too.]

    Although Microsoft indicated that they have closed the backdoor used by this ransomware, more computers globally are not fully secured to prevent the infection by the malware. Interestingly, the hackers have shifted their game from asking for ransom and are now infecting new computers with cryptojacking malware.

  • Cybersecurity Is Only 1 Part of Election Security

    The DEF CON 2018 Voting Machine Hacking Village aimed to raise awareness in voting security through a full day of speakers and panel discussions along with a challenge for attendees to hack more than 30 pieces of voting equipment. A partnership with rOOtz Asylum offered youths between 8 and 16 years old an opportunity to hack replicas of the websites of secretaries of state to demonstrate that even hackers with limited years of experience can easily compromise critical systems. The goal was to break as many voting machine pieces as possible in order to draw attention to the vulnerabilities that will be present in the upcoming 2018 elections.

    The focus on election equipment, however, ignores the greater danger caused by hacking into the diverse collection of sensitive information that flows through political campaigns and the electoral process, and using that to influence and sow distrust among voters. While changing a vote or voting results can be traced back to a particular stakeholder, changing people's understanding of facts is far more insidious.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 114 - Review of "Click Here to Kill Everybody"

    Josh and Kurt review Bruce Schneier's new book Click Here to Kill Everybody. It's a book everyone could benefit from reading. It does a nice job explaining many existing security problems in a simple manner.

​Linus Torvalds takes a break from Linux

Filed under
Linux

In a surprising move, Linus Torvalds, Linux's creator, is taking a break on his Linux kernel work to work on his behavior to other developers. In a note to the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML), Torvalds wrote, "I need to change some of my behavior, and I want to apologize to the people that my personal behavior hurt and possibly drove away from kernel development entirely."

If you follow the trials and tribulations of Linux's developments, this is mind-blowing. For the almost 30-years Torvalds has been working on the kernel, he's been famous--or infamous--for his outbursts towards programmers and others who didn't meet his high expectations.

Over the decades, Torvalds has torn into security developers, open-source lawyers, and other kernel developers, such as Sage, formerly Sarah, Sharp. Every few months, there would be another four-letter Torvalds eruption. This became publicly accepted, but privately it left bad blood.

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Review: Linux Mint 3 Debian Edition (LMDE 3)

Filed under
Reviews

On the whole, I liked running LMDE 3 a lot. The distribution was easy to set up, I liked the quick access to common tools in the welcome window. The change from ranked upgrades to having the system safeguarded by Timeshift snapshots may make things a little harder for newcomers (it's harder to recover a system than to not have it break in the first place), but the new approach probably offers better security in the long run.

One thing I appreciated about LMDE 3 is that it looks beautiful. I usually don't focus much on a theme, or icon style, but Mint looks incredible to me. Everything is high contrast and attractive. The fonts are a little thin for my taste, but this can be easily changed with a few clicks in the settings panel.

I was a little disappointed the system installer defaults to using ext4 instead of Btrfs. Since Mint recommends and relies on Timeshift for system recovery, and Btrfs snapshots are much more efficient than rsync snapshots, it makes sense to me to use Btrfs by default. On a related note, when Timeshift is set up to use rsync snapshots, the rsync command will drag down system performance for about 20 minutes at a time. Having the snapshots run as a lower priority in the background would have avoided slowing down the desktop once a day.

I would have preferred if LMDE had shipped with MATE instead of Cinnamon. I realize Cinnamon is an in-house desktop project and it makes sense for the Mint developers to focus on using and promoting Cinnamon. However, since I suspect many of the people who want to use the Debian branch over the Ubuntu branch will be doing so for performance reasons, I think MATE would make the sensible default. MATE is lighter than Cinnamon, does not require special video driver/hardware support and will run better in virtual environments. Cinnamon is a solid desktop and I think it looks and performs wonderfully on physical hardware, it just doesn't feel like the optimal choice for people who want to run the lighter, more conservative Debian branch of Mint.

Finally, I want to give credit to the Mint team for integrating Flatpak support into the software manager. It is easy to find Flatpaks without having them blend in with other packages, potentially confusing users. I think Flatpak support was handled well by the Mint team.

On the whole, the above points are minor style preferences for a distribution that I was impressed by. Mint's Debian edition performed smoothly, offered a lot of great software out of the box and was easy to use. I think the Debian branch might be slightly less appealing to beginners than the main, Ubuntu-based edition, but there are few practical differences and most people will probably find either branch works for them. I think LMDE will be a good fit for most people, whether beginners or more experienced users.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How to get Apple-like gestures on the Linux desktop
    I understand a big part of the problem is that Apple owns patents on trackpad gestures, something which hinders the open source community's ability to create a quality experience. But that hurdle shouldn't equate to a bad experience, which many people have. Not only does Linux install without any sort of multi-touch gestures, it is sometimes over sensitive or under sensitive. I've installed Linux on laptop hardware and found the trackpad configuration was a losing battle—until I discovered Fusuma.
  • How to fix missing Python for Ansible in Fedora Vagrant
  • Did your open source career begin with video games?
    Certainly you don't need to be a gamer as a child to grow up and become a developer, nor does being a gamer automatically set you up for a career in technology. But there's definitely a good bit of overlap between the two. After listening to the first episode of Command Line Heroes, and reading Ross Turk's story of how MUDs led him to a career in coding, I've thought a bit about how gaming has influenced my own journey into technology, and how it lead to a career in open source. For me, that first important game was WarCraft II. Sure, I played games before it, and after it. But shortly after my family replaced our faithful Apple IIc with a blazing fast (by comparison) 486 PC with amazing features like color, and a sound card, and even a 2400 baud modem (that would take about three months to download the equivalent of an hour of Netflix today).
  • openSUSE to Have Summit in Nashville
    The openSUSE community is headed to Nashville, Tennessee, next year and will have the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville April 5 through April 6, 2019, during the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON. Registration for the event is open and the Call for Papers is open until Jan. 15. Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encourage to register for the summit and submit a talk. The schedule for the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville will be released at the beginning of February.
  • How selfless is your open organization?
    "Community" is a defining characteristic of open organizations. A community could be many things—a "team," a "group," a "department," or a "task force," for example. What makes any of these groups a true community is two distinct factors: a well-defined purpose and clear investment in or value of that purpose. How does a person balance a community's values with his or her own, personal values? How does that person negotiate this relationship when setting goals? Answers to these questions will expose and speak to that person's character.
  • Andres Rodriguez: MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 released
    I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 has been released.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 545
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 545 for the week of September 9 – 15, 2018.
  • Arm delivers production-ready open source Bluetooth Low Energy software stack to unleash IoT innovation
    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is quickly becoming the Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity protocol of choice for a variety of use cases, including smart lighting, smart cities and asset tracking, where low-cost, power consumption and small footprint are fundamental requirements. According to the 2018 Bluetooth Market Update, there will be more than 5 billion Bluetooth device shipments by 2022, with 97% of them containing Bluetooth Low Energy technology. The advances in Bluetooth 5 technology, along with the introduction of Bluetooth Mesh are driving new market opportunities across building automation, sensor networks, and other IoT solutions.
  • Digital Minimalism and Deep Work
    Through Newport's blog I learned that the title of his next book is Digital Minimalism. This intrigued me, because since I started thinking about minimalism myself, I've wondered about the difference of approach needed between minimalism in the "real world" and the digital domains. It turns out the topic of Newport's next book is about something different: from what I can tell, focussing on controlling how one spends one's time online for maximum productivity.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

OSS and Sharing Leftover

  • Announcing Heritage: An Open Source, Public Blockchain Project
    Heritage is a project of A​3​ by Airbus, the advanced projects outpost of Airbus in Silicon Valley. Airbus Foundation is the first strategic partner within Airbus to utilize blockchain technology developed by Heritage. Heritage is a decentralized application for the Airbus Foundation to hold charity fundraising campaigns internal to Airbus. Through open sourcing Heritage, Airbus Foundation will help charities onboard cryptocurrency and smart contracts, opening them to a new class of donor. Heritage hopes to set a standard non-profits can replicate to continue to grow the ecosystem while aiding an underserved market.
  • Versity announces next generation open source archiving filesystem
    Versity Software has announced that it has released ScoutFS under GPLv2. "ScoutFS is the first GPL archiving file system ever released, creating an inherently safer and more user friendly option for storing archival data where accessibility over very large time scales, and the removal of vendor specific risk is a key consideration."
  •  
  • Chrome Beta 70 Brings 2-Factor Authentication Via Fingerprint Sensor To Android & Mac
    With the beta version of Chrome 70 on the roll, Google has added yet another useful feature to make signing into the websites easier. As announced in an official blog post, Chrome now supports 2-factor authentication in Android and Macbook with the device’s fingerprint sensor.
  • Thunderbird 60 with title bar hidden
    Many users like hidden system titlebar as Firefox feature although it’s not finished yet. But we’re very close and I hope to have Firefox 64 in shape that the title bar can be disabled by default at least on Gnome and matches Firefox outfit at Windows and Mac. Thunderbird 60 was finally released for Fedora and comes with a basic version of the feature as it was introduced at Firefox 60 ESR. There’s a simple checkbox at “Customize” page at Firefox but Thunderbird is missing an easy switch.
  • Washington State Electronic Notary Public endorsements

    [...] This all seemed to me to be something that GnuPG is designed to do and does quite well. So I sent an email on Friday night to the sender of the letter requesting specific issues that my provider did not comply with. This morning I received a call from the DoL, and was able to successfully argue for GnuPG's qualification as an electronic records notary public technology provider for the State of Washington.

    In short, GnuPG can now be used to perform notarial acts <http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=42.45.140> in the State of Washington!

  • Surprise: Bill Introduced To Finally Make PACER Free To All
         This would be... amazing. We've spent years highlighting the massive problems with PACER, the federal court system that charges insane amounts for basically everything you do, just to access public records, and which functions very much like it was designed around 1995. There are a few court cases arguing that PACER fees are illegal and a recent ruling in one of those cases agreed. As we noted at the time, that was hardly the final word on the matter. A bill like the ones Collins introduced would be an amazing leap forward in giving public access to court documents.
  • Collins introduces bill to increase transparency and access to federal court documents
    Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) today introduced a bill to reform both parts of the federal courts’ electronic records system. “Americans deserve a justice system that is transparent and accessible. I introduced the Electronic Court Records Reform Act to modernize the judicial records systems and remove fee-for-access barriers that technology has rendered unnecessary,” said Collins. “As an attorney and the son of a law enforcement officer, I understand how crucial it is that this legislation ensures access to a freer, fairer and more accountable judiciary.”

Security: UIDAI, Wireshark, Hackers For Good

  • Software Patch Claimed To Allow Aadhaar's Security To Be Bypassed, Calling Into Question Biometric Database's Integrity
    As the Huffington Post article explains, creating a patch that is able to circumvent the main security features in this way was possible thanks to design choices made early on in the project. The unprecedented scale of the Aadhaar enrollment process -- so far around 1.2 billion people have been given an Aadhaar number and added to the database -- meant that a large number of private agencies and village-level computer kiosks were used for registration. Since connectivity was often poor, the main software was installed on local computers, rather than being run in the cloud. The patch can be used by anyone with local access to the computer system, and simply involves replacing a folder of Java libraries with versions lacking the security checks. The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), the government body responsible for the Aadhaar project, has responded to the Huffington Post article, but in a rather odd way: as a Donald Trump-like stream of tweets. The Huffington Post points out: "[the UIDAI] has simply stated that its systems are completely secure without any supporting evidence."
  • New CAS BACnet Wireshark Report Tool Helps User to Quickly Locate Intermittent Issues
  • Hackers For Good, Working To Gather Stakeholders To Find Answers To Cyberspace Challenges
    For a number of people, the word hacker means bad news. However, if some hackers have malevolent intentions, there are also hackers for good, and their skills were put to the challenge last week as they tried to save a fictitious city fallen into the hands of a group of cyber terrorists. The challenge was part of a two-day event organised by a young Geneva-based non-governmental organisation seeking to raise awareness about digital trust and bring accountability to cyberspace.