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Thursday, 21 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME Control Center 3.14.3 Brings Support for NetworkManager 1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 11:52pm
Story Fedora 22 Alpha MATE/Compiz Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 11:15pm
Story Manjaro XFCE 0.9.0-pre4 edition released Rianne Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 10:53pm
Story Open-Source Robotic Arm Now Within Reach Rianne Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 10:42pm
Story Android 5.1 Hides A Little Secret - Google VPN Rianne Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 9:45pm
Story SanDisk, Huawei Share Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 5:28pm
Story Meizu M1 Note confirmed to go international after Ubuntu Touch-powered variant Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 5:21pm
Story Ozon OS `Hydrogen` Beta Available For Download Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 4:42pm
Story OpenELEC, Manjaro, Puppy Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 4:21pm
Story Week in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 2:55pm

MEPIS 8.5 Beta1

Filed under
Linux

planetoss.com: MEPIS Linux, the KDE based Linux distribution, released the beta1 of MEPIS 8.5. MEPIS Linux was one of the easy to use Linux distributions besides PCLinuxOS, before Ubuntu arrived.

Understanding licenses, bit by bit

Filed under
OSS

blogs.fsfe.org/adridg: An idea that is suggested every now and then is to look at software licensing and give it a kind of “Creative Commons” feel; that is, present the terms of the license in a pleasant and orderly way by means of icons. Now, we’ve already come to the realization that calling something “Creative Commons licensed” is vague to the point of being useless.

3 top Linux distros go for different users

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: At first glance, there's little to differentiate between the latest releases of the top Linux distributions: Red Hat's Fedora 12, Novell's openSUSE 11.2 and Canonical's Ubuntu 9.10. However, a closer look reveals real differences -- in fact, each is meant for a different audience.

Firefox 3.5.6 and 3.0.16 Officially Released

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of Mozilla’s ongoing stability and security update process, Firefox 3.5.6 and Firefox 3.0.16 are now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux as free downloads:

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KOffice - We Have a Plan
  • MySQL 5.5 Milestone 2 improves replication and stored procedures
  • Cloud-oriented netbook distro arrives in beta
  • When your hobby becomes a job: reflections on the em28xx driver situation
  • The Linux Graphics Documentation That's Needed
  • The Relevancy of ODF 1.0
  • Greg K-H: How I apply patches to the stable tree
  • Oracle, MySQL and the EU: The Endgame Q&A
  • Microsoft spanks Drupal: It's all about competition
  • Find Bar - Second version of a search toolbar for OpenOffice.org
  • Is open source a train anyone can stop?
  • Improving boot time on Gentoo
  • China to nurture open source software development
  • Customizing htop
  • Quick Overview of Bsd Systems With Main Focus on Openbsd

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Synchronize a local directory with a remote directory using rsync in ubuntu
  • Custom MOTD for your linux machine
  • How to Get Missing PPA GPG Keys Automatically
  • Verify the Destinations of Shortened URLs the Easy Way
  • Searching and Filtering Photos in digiKam — Part 1
  • Custom Transitioning Backgrounds In KDE3
  • HowTo: Create sar Graphs With kSar
  • Fix for vmware-hostd crash on ubuntu 9.10 with vmware server 2.x
  • Learn to use extended file attributes in Linux to boost security
  • UJS Manager for Opera Unite (Opera 10.10 Browser) installs User Scripts as Extensions
  • CIFS VFS Shutdown Error When Using SMBFS
  • Configuring Strong Wi-Fi (802.1X) Authentication in Linux, Part II

google is your butler- the tension between utility and privacy

Filed under
Google

tieguy.org/blog: I’ve often defended Google’s thirst to know things about people with a butler analogy. Good software should, like a butler, try hard to understand your preferences and act on them for you without you even realizing they are there. The problem, of course, is that your butler has a lot of incentives to keep your private information private.

10 OSes on the Move

Filed under
OS

serverwatch.com: It's certainly been quite a decade in the world of enterprise operating systems: There have been some spectacular winners, like Linux, and few epic failures, like Microsoft Vista. With the end of the decade little more than two weeks away, now seems a good time to take a look at what the future might hold. So to mark the end of the Noughties and the start of the Tens here is a highly subjective list of 10 OSes that will (or in some cases won't) be making the news during the next 10 years.

Bruce Perens' Statement on Busybox Lawsuits

Filed under
OSS
Legal

perens.com/blog: I am the creator of the Busybox program which is currently subject to lawsuits brought by Mr. Erik Andersen and the Software Freedom Law Center, and which was subject to previous suits brought by SFLC, Mr. Andersen and Mr. Robert Landley.

Red Hat Settles Five-Year-Old Shareholder Lawsuit

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat Settles Five-Year-Old Shareholder Lawsuit
  • HP Partners With Microsoft, Novell And Red Hat To Streamline Sun Migrations
  • Piper Jaffray Reiterates an 'Overweight' on Red Hat, Raises PT to $34

some interviews:

Filed under
Interviews
  • Ubuntu's Jono Bacon: Managing an Open Source Community
  • Interview With James Vasile – Software Freedom Law Center
  • An Interview w/ IBM developerWorks GM Jim Corgel

Cherrypal Offers Laptop for Under $100

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcworld.com (IDG): PC maker Cherrypal has done something Nicholas Negroponte's One Laptop Per Child couldn't do: make a laptop that breaks the US$100 price barrier. It can run the Linux or Windows CE operating systems, which are also found on cell phones.

oh Debian, how I dislike you

Filed under
Linux

adeb.posterous.com: Ok, I will admit it, Im a Redhat guy - I understand it, it makes sense to me. However Id like to think I know my way around a Debian based system, but it seems I dont.

Nine Months Later: Mono 2.6 and MonoDevelop 2.2

Filed under
Software

tirania.org/blog: About nine months ago we released MonoDevelop 2.0 and Mono 2.4. Today we are releasing the much anticipated upgrades to both. Mono 2.6 and MonoDevelop 2.2.

SimplyMEPIS 8.5 beta2 Improvements

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: Warren Woodford has uploaded SimplyMEPIS 8.4.94, the beta2 of MEPIS 8.5. Warren reports the follow changes: "The rapid response of the Debian KDE Team made it possible for us to recompile KDE 4.3.4 in time for this beta. And we were able to fix the perpetually problematic Python toolchain."

Puppy Linux: Just for fun

Filed under
Linux

itpro.co.uk: Puppy Linux is something different, a tiny version of Linux that can be stored on a USB memory drive, will run in memory, and can be used for working on the move.

Firefox 3.5.6 and 3.0.16

Filed under
Moz/FF

ghacks.net: The Mozilla Firefox developers have begun spreading the new Firefox 3.5.6 to the ftp mirror servers around the world which is an indication that the public release is imminent. Release notes and information have not been updated yet.

Also: Hands On Review of Thunderbird 3

8 Cheerful Christmas Linux Wallpapers

Filed under
Linux

learningubuntu.com: Tis the season — for Christmas Linux wallpapers that is. Today I'm going to present to you 8 incredible Linux wallpapers that will set you in a Christmassy mood for the whole month.

Is Linux really that hard to use?

Filed under
Linux

locutus.us: One of the biggest arguments that windows advocates use against Linux is that it is hard to use. That is why, they state, windows is so popular and a default standard in the enterprise world. Windows advocates believe that Linux is confusing and often cryptic with hard to understand, little or no documentation.

GNOME Foundation seeks to hide its dirty linen

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: A few members of the GNOME Foundation have submitted a petition to the board, asking for a referendum to be held on making the Foundation's mailing list archives private and limited to its members only.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.